Windows Phone 7 unlocker released

Ten years ago the idea of rooting or jailbreaking a phone was nonexistent. Today, if you truly want to harness the entire power of your mobile device; it's an evil, but required step. The newest platform from Microsoft has now been unlocked and the ability to sideload apps is now possible.

According to the ChevronWP7 blog, WP7 has been unlocked and the operating system is now exposed to the homebrew community.

Today we have an exciting breakthrough for the Windows Phone 7 homebrew community - the ability for anyone to unlock a WP7 device without a Marketplace developer account. Unlocking allows the sideloading of experimental applications that would otherwise can’t be published to the Marketplace, such as those which access private or native APIs.

The ability to unlock an OS is a crucial step for any platform. Despite the circumvention, the jailbreaking community can be credited with helping to propel the iPhone into the mainstream by allowing new features and programs to the platform long before Apple made them available.  

As with any platform unlocking, you are are cautioned to do so at your own risk. There is always a risk of bricking your device that may void your warranty.  

Image Credit: Istartedsomething.com

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46 Comments

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Since when has exploiting/jailbreaking etc been considered an evil act? Wrong maybe, but i do not see how it is considered evil.

Ultravires said,
Since when has exploiting/jailbreaking etc been considered an evil act? Wrong maybe, but i do not see how it is considered evil.

It's not, for a lot developers that are spending time and money to develop games/apps for the phone won't be able to recoop a lot cost cause they can't make games as powerful as they can be cause the XNA team locked down the phone so the only way to get access to all the more powerful API's and to skip passed a lot of the slow memory techniques XNA requires, is to jailbreak the phone and develop a native app that has to be put on a 3rd party marketplace...if MS just exposes a few simple things like:


1) Live Networking.
2) Pointers - faster memeory management to skip passed a lot of the downfalls of the GC, streaming textures for big terrain(megatexture?).
3) Programmable pipeline - how the hell do you overlook that for RTM?
4) A faster way to blit textures to the graphics card(texture2d.setdata is horrible ).
5) A network drive that allows copying files to and from the application folder so studios don't have to buy a VS2010 license for each artists/level designer etc so they can deploy there content. The content manager is designed for hobbiests not professional developers.
6) If they don't want native code at all, develop something so smaller studios that have spent money buying 3rd party plugins such as scaleform and spending time integrating it into there codebase don't have to throw it all away cause they don't have the ability to port over the 3rd party plugin themselves.

Than there might not be so much of a need for native code access(except for games that require 3rd party libraries such as Scaleform and various physics libraries). I believe C# is the future language of games, but the XNA api as it stands won't be.

The XNA api is probably going to be the biggest downfall of WP7, there is too much hand holding too much abstraction. This has been stated by a lot of people the API needs to be geared towards professional developers rather than towards hobbiests. This "We know what API's you need" mentality is pure arrogance and I hope they change the policy so WP7 will become a excellent platform for new developers to make a name for themselves.

Edited by LiveAndFight, Nov 25 2010, 7:53pm :

It amazes me the arrogance behind the XNA team, they restricted and basically crippled the API they give out to legit developers and hackers will have full access to the entire framework. Its going to come down to marketplace apps are going to me small indie games and all the AAA titles will be cydia

jasonon said,
Don't you lose warrenty if you do this?

No, this feature is COMPLETELY supported by microsoft, all this does is open up a feature for free that you would otherwise have to pay $99 a year for.

mad_onion said,

No, this feature is COMPLETELY supported by microsoft, all this does is open up a feature for free that you would otherwise have to pay $99 a year for.

That's completely and utterly false, this is in no way supported by Microsoft. If you pay the $99 a year it gains you the ability to sideload apps for testing but retains your ability to download from the marketplace, this "hack" bans your phone from the marketplace and possibly Xbox Live as well.

Great job. No this didn't take long but iOS get's jailbroken on the day it gets released. I am sure M$ will patch this up in 1.1 though. I guess now we will vendor unlock for ROM flashing as well.

This isn't jailbreaking! And it can't brick your device. Its a perfectly supported feature. The article couldn't be more wrong, maybe the writer should do some research before posting news. All this does is allow people to sideload apps that wouldn't pass marketplace certification like ones that use private APIs. The integrity of the os remains intact.

mad_onion said,
This isn't jailbreaking! And it can't brick your device. Its a perfectly supported feature. The article couldn't be more wrong, maybe the writer should do some research before posting news. All this does is allow people to sideload apps that wouldn't pass marketplace certification like ones that use private APIs. The integrity of the os remains intact.

You are absolutely wrong. Microsoft created Silverlight and XNA to sandbox apps. If your apps can access any unmanged API then you could wipe the storage, access system files that you shouldnt, write an app to hang your device etc

Riva said,

You are absolutely wrong. Microsoft created Silverlight and XNA to sandbox apps. If your apps can access any unmanged API then you could wipe the storage, access system files that you shouldnt, write an app to hang your device etc


But that isn't what is happening here...

Riva said,

You are absolutely wrong. Microsoft created Silverlight and XNA to sandbox apps. If your apps can access any unmanged API then you could wipe the storage, access system files that you shouldnt, write an app to hang your device etc

He's not wrong. You can access unmanaged code through Silverlight, Microsoft just won't let you put those applications on the marketplace (unless you're a special partner of theirs). There's already been a few programs floating around on XDA that access unmanaged code to let us explore the phone for over a week now, and it's how device manufacturers like LG & HTC can get their apps to access hardware features the rest of us can't.

Riva said,

You are absolutely wrong. Microsoft created Silverlight and XNA to sandbox apps. If your apps can access any unmanged API then you could wipe the storage, access system files that you shouldnt, write an app to hang your device etc

Ok, but the apps are still running within the confines of silverlight and thus can only use apis that silverlight supports. As you rightly say silverlight is sandboxed and so you won't be able to access the file system that way.

mad_onion said,

Ok, but the apps are still running within the confines of silverlight and thus can only use apis that silverlight supports. As you rightly say silverlight is sandboxed and so you won't be able to access the file system that way.


You can call unmanaged API and do everything a native app can do

mad_onion said,

Ok, but the apps are still running within the confines of silverlight and thus can only use apis that silverlight supports. As you rightly say silverlight is sandboxed and so you won't be able to access the file system that way.

Didn't chris something write an application that got access to the filesystem? Sense app's that use all the backend api's provide the programmer with a more powerful toolbox this is jailbreaking, because people can install whatever they want, including pirated marketplace app's(packet sniffing anyone?), that is more or less the definition of jailbreak being able to run whatever applications you want and having access to whatever API's you want...

This isn't jailbreaking! And it can't brick your device. Its a perfectly supported feature. The article couldn't be more wrong, maybe the writer should do some research before posting news. All this does is allow people to sideload apps that wouldn't pass marketplace certification like ones that use private APIs. The integrity of the os remains intact.

njlouch said,

Read the article!

The article isn't *that* clear, as the use of "unlocked" is a bit over-zealous.

It allows "... the sideloading of experimental applications that would otherwise can't be published to the Marketplace, such as those which access private or native APIs."

You'll still need to install the Windows Phone developer tools to deploy the applications though.

~Johnny said,

The article isn't *that* clear, as the use of "unlocked" is a bit over-zealous.

It allows "... the sideloading of experimental applications that would otherwise can't be published to the Marketplace, such as those which access private or native APIs."

You'll still need to install the Windows Phone developer tools to deploy the applications though.

Thanks. That means I did read the article. Kinda waiting for network unlock.

sanke1 said,
What kind of unlocking is this?

OS root control unlock or network unlock or both ?


The kind that gets you blocked from the market.

~Johnny said,

The article isn't *that* clear, as the use of "unlocked" is a bit over-zealous.

It allows "... the sideloading of experimental applications that would otherwise can't be published to the Marketplace, such as those which access private or native APIs."

You'll still need to install the Windows Phone developer tools to deploy the applications though.

You just stated what article said... No difference what-so-ever. The article has an included screenshot too and says nowhere that it unlocks your phone to be used on other networks...

Electric Jolt said,

You just stated what article said... No difference what-so-ever. The article has an included screenshot too and says nowhere that it unlocks your phone to be used on other networks...

No he didn't. He cleared up the doubt the guy was having. And what's up with the useless non constructive opinions?

Artillery said,

No he didn't. He cleared up the doubt the guy was having. And what's up with the useless non constructive opinions?

It was a fact and I post lots of contructive opinions all the time, maybe if you really care what I'm saying you should look at my other comments first.

Hollow.Droid said,
Any SG fans also think that is a pretty awesome name for an unlocker?

The word "Chevron" existed LONG before Stargate was ever invented, lol !

> = a chevron

TCLN Ryster said,

The word "Chevron" existed LONG before Stargate was ever invented, lol !

> = a chevron


Oh I know, it just seemed like a nerdy link to SG. Chevron 7 being the fan convention and locked being what is said when dialing the gate. Maybe it's just me

Hollow.Droid said,

Oh I know, it just seemed like a nerdy link to SG. Chevron 7 being the fan convention and locked being what is said when dialing the gate. Maybe it's just me

Not just you, I chuckled and made the kawooosh sound in my head.

The Protagonist said,
lol this didnt take long at all now did it
Because MS blew it with Samsung app which used native code and all eagle eyed hackers saw it.