Windows Phone unlock tokens sold out

ChevronWP7 made a big splash in the Windows Phone communities as it allows individuals to unlock their devices for a small fee. Unfortunately, the future of the program is a bit uncertain; the group is currently discussing internally about if they will offer more unlock tokens.

They intially purchased 10,000 tokens according to the group's official twitter feed (via Zdnet). As it stands, those tokens have sold out and, according to a post to Twitter, there are no current plans to purchase any more at the moment. But, in a later posting, it has been clarified that the group is currently discussing internally if they will approach Microsoft to purchase more tokens. While the project remains in limbo, there are currently no tokens left to purchase.

While the group has not publically discussed why they would not purchase more tokens, one indiciation may be from Rafael's Twitter account where he has stated that supporting the project is not an easy task. In another tweet, he exclaims his dismay for having to deal with PayPal disputes. It seems that it is not the tool that is creating the headaches for the group, but rather the overhead that comes with supporting it. This includes customer disputes and, as he writes on his own site, dealing with inaccurate information that is published by the media.

While we hope that the group obtains more tokens from Microsoft, we do know that if there is a need in the marketplace of homebrew devices, if ChevronWP7 is not up to the task, another group or indiviudal may step in.

 

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17 Comments

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dotf said,
I bet a portion of those 10k will be succeptible to the first successful malware app.

The only non-marketplace code I run is my own.


While that can be true, one can be careful when installing non-marketplace apps. This is true for all platforms.

They sold 10,000 tokens at $9 a piece in rather a short time and they are complaining about dealing with overhead and how they might not want to make any more money....

thealexweb said,
Just goes to show users want an open platform and not to be locked down.

Are you aware what chevron does? It allows you to run up to 10 applications using libraries who aren't allowed on the marketplace, nothing more, nothing less.
And those libraries are the open way to malware, backdoor and so on (ex: an appz can fully send all your contact to anybody).

So yeah, "open platform", sure. I mean, have you any idea about what you are talking about? This isn't about opening the platform but to remove all barriers from appz.

Not to start a flame war...but I think an environment needs both. A locked down feature-set for a stable and reliable OS (like iOS) and an unlocked feature-set for enthusiasts (android) - Average joe blogs doesn't need to be able to install a custom rom, or modify the bootloader. I think CWP7 is great for the bleeding edge of dev, hope it lives on!

thealexweb said,
Just goes to show users want an open platform and not to be locked down.

It is about as Open as Windows Phone can get. It's still a locked down OS it's just not as locked down as iOS.

UndergroundWire said,

It is about as Open as Windows Phone can get. It's still a locked down OS it's just not as locked down as iOS.

Which is a great thing in many ways.

Anthonyd said,

Are you aware what chevron does? It allows you to run up to 10 applications using libraries who aren't allowed on the marketplace, nothing more, nothing less.
And those libraries are the open way to malware, backdoor and so on (ex: an appz can fully send all your contact to anybody).

So yeah, "open platform", sure. I mean, have you any idea about what you are talking about? This isn't about opening the platform but to remove all barriers from appz.

Being able to legally install something not from the offical app store, that sound like openess to me

Anthonyd said,

And those libraries are the open way to malware, backdoor and so on (ex: an appz can fully send all your contact to anybody).

Actually, it doesn't allow you to run any libraries that require interop services / anything that can break out of the Silverlight sandbox. SO no malware, no backdoors, no anything. It's exactly the same environment a standard marketplace developer gets, which includes no access.

Anthonyd said,

Are you aware what chevron does? It allows you to run up to 10 applications using libraries who aren't allowed on the marketplace, nothing more, nothing less.
And those libraries are the open way to malware, backdoor and so on (ex: an appz can fully send all your contact to anybody).

So yeah, "open platform", sure. I mean, have you any idea about what you are talking about? This isn't about opening the platform but to remove all barriers from appz.

You obviously don't know what you are talking about . . .

~Johnny said,

Actually, it doesn't allow you to run any libraries that require interop services / anything that can break out of the Silverlight sandbox. SO no malware, no backdoors, no anything. It's exactly the same environment a standard marketplace developer gets, which includes no access.


Are you sure about that?
I thought P/Invoke was banned at the certification level, not directly on the phone...

Aethec said,

Are you sure about that?
I thought P/Invoke was banned at the certification level, not directly on the phone...

Interop is blocked on the phone with Mango. However, you can circumvent it relatively easily by following guides on xda.

My HD7 has mango installed, and is dev and interop unlocked =)

Muhammad Farrukh said,

Which is a great thing in many ways.

Different business stragety. That is only your opinion and not an opinion shared by most. Otherwise Microsoft would have done the same thing to Windows Desktop or Windows Phone Market share would be in a better position.

Anthonyd said,

Are you aware what chevron does? It allows you to run up to 10 applications using libraries who aren't allowed on the marketplace, nothing more, nothing less.
And those libraries are the open way to malware, backdoor and so on (ex: an appz can fully send all your contact to anybody).

So yeah, "open platform", sure. I mean, have you any idea about what you are talking about? This isn't about opening the platform but to remove all barriers from appz.

I do have an idea, a clear one actually, of what I am talking about: it makes WP7 "experience" a little bit closer to the W7 one. I would say that the latter is a successful product, isn't' it?