Windows Store for Windows 8 details revealed

Windows 8 may still be several months away, at the very least, but that isn't stopping Microsoft from giving a preview of one the operating system's big new features: the Windows Store. AllThingsD.com reports that during a San Francisco-based press event on Tuesday, Microsoft gave out some of the details about the Windows Store which is Microsoft's answer to Apple's App Store for its iOS devices.

The big news is that the Windows Store will be made available when Windows 8 goes into its public beta, which Microsoft has now confirmed will happen sometime in late February 2012. All apps in the Windows Store for the Windows 8 beta will be free to download. However, Microsoft will be making private invites to developer who want to offer their apps for the store during the beta period.

Microsoft also posted on its blog the highlights:

Highlights included:

  • Revenue model: Successful apps earn 80 percent of every dollar of revenue earned after passing $25,000 USD in total revenue. The first $25,000 USD is paid out at the industry standard 70 percent revenue share.
  • Timing: Opening its doors at Windows 8 Beta in late February 2012, the Windows Store will welcome developers to begin submitting apps starting today through the First Apps Contest to be considered for the Store’s opening. More details on the contest can be found at buildwindowscontest.com
  • Opportunity: Windows presents the largest single platform opportunity for developers, with 500 million Windows 7 licenses sold around the world to date.  

More good news for developers:

  • Transparent terms: The goals of the Windows Store app certification process are to ensure trusted, quality experiences for consumers and a simple, transparent process for developers through the App Certification Kit, Windows Developer Dashboard and the Windows Store App Certification requirements, found here.
  • Flexible business models: Microsoft respects developer choice, and will offer a robust transaction platform while allowing them to utilize alternate transaction services. The Windows Store will also support multiple advertising platforms.
  • Unprecedented global reach: The Windows Store will be global, enabling developers to sell their apps in any of 231 markets and in more than 100 languages.   
  • Optimized for discoverability: App discoverability and promotion are top priorities in the Windows Store with the benefits of app listing pages, trial periods and search with Bing and promotion through Internet Explorer.

One of the big new features is that the Windows Store will offer free trial versions of the apps in the storefront, much like how there are often free trials of the apps in the Windows Phone Marketplace. You will be able to convert the free trial to the full version with payment and without the need to get a second version of the app.

Microsoft will also link Windows Store apps to Internet search engines. Indeed, Windows 8's Internet Explorer 10 web browser will have a button that will link to the Windows Store apps.

Apps sold via the Windows Store will also be able to use their own subscription services to charge customers for extra features, which is something that Apple doesn't allow app developers to support with its App Store. Ad-supported apps are also allowed, with Microsoft letting the developer pick whichever ad solution they want.

Microsoft's cut of revenues from Windows Store apps will be 30 percent at first. However, the company will actually drop that number down to 20 percent after the app earns over $25,000 in downloads and/or in in-app revenues. App prices themselves can range from $1.49 to $999.99 in 50c intervals.

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45 Comments

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Ah, so it is only for Metro apps.

Great, I dont care then I thought it was going to be for all Windows apps and the that Windows Store was going to be linked to those apps giving Microsoft also some control.

tomcoleman said,
3:17 doesnt work when he touches the screeen.

The metro UI, touching a screen on a laptop = FAIL

Or maybe it is because video ends before he actually touches it ? It's obvious if you pay attention to his arm movement on previous touches.

tomcoleman said,
The metro UI, touching a screen on a laptop = FAIL

Until you start using touch technology regularly.
Since getting my touchsmart TM2 and it's tabletop counterpart, I find myself on other systems I still reach for the screen......

Touch is a more intuitive interaction model than grab the mouse, find the pointer on screen, and navigate.

Seriously.

Sadelwo said,
I really hope Steam/Origin have metro apps ready by then.

It's just kind of hard for me to imagine real hardcore games - Skyrim, for instance - becoming metro apps. I worry that they will end up being legacy apps and eventually dying out to FarmVille. I hope I'm wrong, but I doubt the devs want to give anyone else a cut of their profits.

Unprecedented global reach: The Windows Store will be global, enabling developers to sell their apps in any of 231 markets and in more than 100 languages.

highly doubt so. considering present ms policy. they applying single price policy which is closing access to over half of the world due to significantly higher prices for emerging and undeveloped markets where salaries are 5-15 times lower than western. also they accept western payment systems only - visa, mastercard, pay pal. this also makes half of the world impossible to buy anything.

coth said,

highly doubt so. considering present ms policy. they applying single price policy which is closing access to over half of the world due to significantly higher prices for emerging and undeveloped markets where salaries are 5-15 times lower than western. also they accept western payment systems only - visa, mastercard, pay pal. this also makes half of the world impossible to buy anything.


i think you should have visited the MSDN blog first and read it...
for consumers local currencies are supported -
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-u...064.aspx#consumer_countries
and for developers payouts are also supported in local currencies -
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-u...4066.aspx#account_countries
about the pricing issue... well it depends on the developers how they price their app, doesnt it..? and microsoft is not responsible for that...

PacificAk said,

i think you should have visited the MSDN blog first and read it...
for consumers local currencies are supported -
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-u...064.aspx#consumer_countries
and for developers payouts are also supported in local currencies -
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-u...4066.aspx#account_countries
about the pricing issue... well it depends on the developers how they price their app, doesnt it..? and microsoft is not responsible for that...

currencies is just 1/3 of the problem. another 2/3 is lack of support payment systems. what's the point of currencies if it's only have tendency to support visa, mastercard and pay pal. for russia no terminal payments, yandex.money, webmoney, russian cards etc

it's still ms responsibility to make extensive locale support, not only for titles, descriptions, but also for apps themself, prices etc. market should provide an ability for developers not only setting everything for every locale, but should also have automated adjustment system, which should be set on by default.

jasonon said,
will the html5 apps run on any browser?

If by html5 apps you mean "metro apps" then they're going to run using WinRT, which runs out of the browser like a real app.

jasonon said,
will the html5 apps run on any browser?

No. They use specialised libraries and controls that only work on Windows 8.

dotf said,
omg metro is ugly, let me disable it MS, it doesn't belong on desktops and this proves it.
/s

Oh, good grief. WhatEVER, @dotf. If you are so incompetent that you can't figure out the Metro UI, then you need to change to Apple products. That's for simpletons.

ScubaDog said,
....

Rofl.

I am one of the biggest supporters of Metro (and its underlying Windows Runtime) on this site. I thought the "/s" would indicate sarcasm, but I guess I was wrong.

I don't want to start a flame war, nor say that anybody copied from elsewhere, but it really looks a lot like the Android Market on mobile.

Fedr0 said,
I don't want to start a flame war, nor say that anybody copied from elsewhere, but it really looks a lot like the Android Market on mobile.

No, Android Market really looks like this.

Fedr0 said,
I don't want to start a flame war, nor say that anybody copied from elsewhere, but it really looks a lot like the Android Market on mobile.

It looks like the Xbox market and thats not a new thing. Don't want to start a flame war but the Android Market looks like that, not the other way around. So yeah, once again the copycat is Google. As always.

FTA: Opportunity: Windows presents the largest single platform opportunity for developers, with 500 million Windows 7 licenses sold around the world to date.

Does this mean Windows 7 will be supported with an App store too?

ccoltmanm said,
FTA: Opportunity: Windows presents the largest single platform opportunity for developers, with 500 million Windows 7 licenses sold around the world to date.

Does this mean Windows 7 will be supported with an App store too?

No. It gives the developers a look into how mow many customers they may possibly have.

I m a bit concerned about this app store, I hope it is limited to only new metro style apps, windows has been known for a long time as free platform to develop applications on. I dont think this style should change, making it more expensive for developers is not a good idea in my opinion, I dont want to see the cost increase for us as the consumers.

If I'm not mistaken Desktop apps will be in the store, the apps page will send you to the developers website for download/purchase.
Besides, even if desktop apps was in the store the same way metro apps are doesn't mean developers couldn't release their apps outside the store...

carson2255 said,
I m a bit concerned about this app store, I hope it is limited to only new metro style apps, windows has been known for a long time as free platform to develop applications on. I dont think this style should change, making it more expensive for developers is not a good idea in my opinion, I dont want to see the cost increase for us as the consumers.

It's still free and open, you aren't forced to list your desktop app on there, and legacy desktop apps will just be listed with a link that goes to your website directly, so it's more like a central place for promotion of both metro and desktop apps.

I don't know how metro apps will be though, I haven't read up on it or if they're going to force metro apps to be installed through the app store only etc.

I'm kind of surprised that the put Evernote in the preview picture, considering that it's sort of a competitor to OneNote.

"Ad-supported apps are also allowed, with Microsoft letting the developer pick whichever ad solution they want."

I think this is a bad idea. It will open the doors to apps serving malicious ads which can track your habits and possibly install or redirect to malware.

They should provide a certified list of ad servers that app developers are allowed to use.

The Dark Knight said,
"Ad-supported apps are also allowed, with Microsoft letting the developer pick whichever ad solution they want."

I think this is a bad idea. It will open the doors to apps serving malicious ads which can track your habits and possibly install or redirect to malware.

They should provide a certified list of ad servers that app developers are allowed to use.

It's nothing new. Now one can develop an application with ads for Win7/Xp. it's nothing new. (You do have option to configure your firewall)

They shouldn't just have said what Ad providers to use, they should have banned it outright. I thought they cared about having a good user experience? Yea ads in apps is not part of that...

Leonick said,
They shouldn't just have said what Ad providers to use, they should have banned it outright. I thought they cared about having a good user experience? Yea ads in apps is not part of that...

In iOS you're forced to use the iAd platform. Once again, Apple change everything.

The Dark Knight said,
"Ad-supported apps are also allowed, with Microsoft letting the developer pick whichever ad solution they want."

I think this is a bad idea. It will open the doors to apps serving malicious ads which can track your habits and possibly install or redirect to malware.

They should provide a certified list of ad servers that app developers are allowed to use.

Microsoft will use their own Ad Platform, free from malware.

Leonick said,
They shouldn't just have said what Ad providers to use, they should have banned it outright. I thought they cared about having a good user experience? Yea ads in apps is not part of that...

I've used ad supported apps and games on my phone, as long as it's not in your face and off to the side/top etc it's nothing big. Devs need to get some money to and I don't see anything wrong with letting them pick the ad platform they want.

***One of the big new features is that the Windows Store will offer free trial versions of the apps in the storefront, much like how there are often free trials of the apps in the Windows Phone Marketplace. You will be able to convert the free trial to the full version with payment and without the need to get a second version of the app.****

this is crap i have many times downloaded the trail version and decided to buy it and next thing you know im downloading a new version.

lflashl said,
***One of the big new features is that the Windows Store will offer free trial versions of the apps in the storefront, much like how there are often free trials of the apps in the Windows Phone Marketplace. You will be able to convert the free trial to the full version with payment and without the need to get a second version of the app.****

this is crap i have many times downloaded the trail version and decided to buy it and next thing you know im downloading a new version.

No, the article is correct.

The develoers who wrote the WP7 apps you bought must have failed to use the trial version correctly. They probably released the typical "Lite" version along with the full one.

The reason the developer uploaded two different versions is so that their app would appear in the free category, or they simply didn't know about the trial versions.

Nevertheless, Microsoft needs to add a filter method for trials, so that devs don't release two versions just so that people can find their "free" version.

Not user-friendly? Huh?

So far, I've had VERY little trouble (and not so much as ONE major issue) with the Developer Preview - could it be that it's because I'm not so hung up on the Start menu (despite a history going back to Windows/286, and including Windows 3.x, NT4/9x, 2000/XP, but not ME)?

Office 2010 works just fine in the Developer Preview (Metro UI and all) and it's not a Metro application suite. In fact, I haven't run into so much as a single compatibility issue with any application (from anybody). The same applies to games. In fact, I'm finding that most of my games/applications run *better* in the Developer Preview than on Windows 7 x64 SP1 - and on the same hardware, with the same drivers - how do you explain that?

Having never used a Windows Phone, I'm curious as to whether Metro apps will be highly instensive applications like Office, Photoshop, Cinema 4D, MATLAB etc... that I can buy, download and maintain all from the Windows Store. That'd be awesome. I could spend a lot of my time within the Metro experience.
Because what I imagine is it'll be a lot of apps that could've just as easily been a webpage, such as an eBay app or a Facebook app. I don't see fart apps, but I also don't see legitimately useful things. I eagerly away the slew of new developments to prove me wrong.

I believe I heard during the keynotes that the Windows Store would offer Metro-style apps as well as traditional desktop apps. So theoretically you could obtain Office and Photoshop and all the rest through the Windows store as Metro-style apps, traditional apps, or both.

AstareGod said,
I believe I heard during the keynotes that the Windows Store would offer Metro-style apps as well as traditional desktop apps. So theoretically you could obtain Office and Photoshop and all the rest through the Windows store as Metro-style apps, traditional apps, or both.

Only Metro apps will be directly managed from the store. Legacy apps will just get a listing in the store that will link to a developer's website.

Considering the ease of use of one-click installs vs. downloading and installing legacy, there will be a strong push to covert legacy apps into Metro apps to be sold directly in the store.

dagamer34 said,

Only Metro apps will be directly managed from the store. Legacy apps will just get a listing in the store that will link to a developer's website.

Considering the ease of use of one-click installs vs. downloading and installing legacy, there will be a strong push to covert legacy apps into Metro apps to be sold directly in the store.

Strong push is right. How else will MS be able to enforce a 30% tax on developers in the future like Apple does.

ajua said,

lol

u bet thats the first app that came to mind but i was thinking about the creative suite that costs more .. which means the metro photoshop app will be a scaled down version for sure.