World IPv6 day: Google, Facebook and others testing for 24-hours

On Wednesday, a number of large websites from around the Internet joined the Internet Society to announce World IPv6 day, a 24-hour test period where all the agreed websites will enable the IPv6 protocol alongside the typical IPv4 for the day to test compatability.

On June 8, 2011, Google, Facebook, Yahoo! Akami, Limelight and other websites will join Internet Society in making the first major "test flight" to IPv6. With over a billion combined hits between the websites, these websites will be testing their infrastructure to ensure that they can handle the switch. During World IPv6 day, experts predict that only 0.05% of the Internet users will have trouble connecting to these websites due to misconfigured or misbehaving home network devices.

IPv4 uses a 32-bit (four-byte) address, limiting the number of available unique addresses to 4,294,967,296. However, some of these addresses have been reserved for private networks, limiting the available public addresses. IPv6 uses a 128-bit address, allowing for approximately 3.4 x 10^38, enough public addresses to last us a lifetime.

Available IPv4 addresses are now in the final 2%, with just 91 million addresses left. These publicly available Internet addresses are expected to completely be gone in the next 32 days.

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Being in IT, I think with IPv6 it's safe to say we'll have enough addresses for a while. Every single human on the planet could have 5.66666667 × 10^28 addresses assigned to it before the address space would be exhausted. I don't think I'll have that many devices. Ever. Guess it's time to go get up to speed on IPv6...

Your readiness scores
9/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
7/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

Although I cheated, my ISP doesn't offer IPv6 yet :-(
Your IPv6 service appears to be: he.net. or tunnelbroker.net < Using tunnelled Ipv6 for now.

sgt.banjo said,
I wanna be a duodecillionaire, so frikkin baaad.....

I shudder to think what the inflation level would have to be

Xenomorph said,
If IPv6 has more addresses than we could ever use, why not shorten it to make addresses easier to identify/remember?
IPv6 does have a shorthand notation to avoid unnecessarily long addresses.

http://knowledgelayer.softlayer.com/questions/459/IPv6+overview

Ignoring padded 0s, it's difficult to come up with patterns that wouldn't otherwise be removing information from the address, and thus changing it. Unfortunately, it would defeat the purpose of lengthening the address.

Chasethebase said,
My university is gonna be poopin' brix when the time comes.

Why, if they already have IP addresses then there is no problem. It is a problem for when new people/organisations want addresses.

IP6 is for more than just an increase of IP addresses, but again... the many noobs here fail to understand this.

What ever happened to IPv5? IPv6 is but viral IETF marketing. The cake is a lie. IPv6 is a lie. I'm far safe in my NAT world.

Breach said,
What ever happened to IPv5? IPv6 is but viral IETF marketing. The cake is a lie. IPv6 is a lie. I'm far safe in my NAT world.

IPv5 never became an official standard, but it would be Internet Stream Protocol. Were skipping it for IPv6

Also getting rid of your "NAT world" is one of the great things of IPv6. NAT is slow and limits the maximum number of connections possible. Especially as we run lower on IPv4 address ISPs will start having to put you behind a NAT, no real IP address to contact is a huge negative. Also being behind multiple NATs is NEVER fun.

The countdown is just until all IP blocks have been assigned to an owner. it does not mean that the worls is actually out of IP addresses.

hdood said,
The countdown is just until all IP blocks have been assigned to an owner. it does not mean that the worls is actually out of IP addresses.

No, but it means the root source of IPv4 addresses has run out. As an example, it's like the Earth running out of oil (which is something that is also probably going to occur in my lifetime). Sure, there is still lots of oil in refineries and refined products at petrol/gas stations, but there will never again be any fresh supplies of oil to those refineries, and therefore shortly afterwards no more petrol/gas deliveries to stations either. As such the cost of petrol/gas will go up based purely on supply and demand, just as the cost of IPv4 addresses will go up with ISPs charging more for static addresses.

hdood said,
The countdown is just until all IP blocks have been assigned to an owner. it does not mean that the worls is actually out of IP addresses.

That's right.. and the internet isn't just going to stop functioning when the limit is reached!

Your readiness scores
10/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
10/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

Virgin (Goatee Branson) Media say... We no not have any plans as of yet as this is a new technology and when it come availbe Virgin Media make an announcement to their customers.

New technology, it's not new, I was made aware of IPv4 running out of IP addressees in 2000, IPv6 is not new. the fact that, I do believe there are approximate 4.3 million IP addressees left and it's estimated that it will run out in 2 years.

^ estimations on IP availabilities are worthless.

at the current rate of IP's being assigned we would run out in a day, the lucky thing is there are lots expiring dropping back into the pot..

We have essentially already maxed our capabilities so IPv6 is needed ASAP

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