World IPv6 day: Google, Facebook and others testing for 24-hours

On Wednesday, a number of large websites from around the Internet joined the Internet Society to announce World IPv6 day, a 24-hour test period where all the agreed websites will enable the IPv6 protocol alongside the typical IPv4 for the day to test compatability.

On June 8, 2011, Google, Facebook, Yahoo! Akami, Limelight and other websites will join Internet Society in making the first major "test flight" to IPv6. With over a billion combined hits between the websites, these websites will be testing their infrastructure to ensure that they can handle the switch. During World IPv6 day, experts predict that only 0.05% of the Internet users will have trouble connecting to these websites due to misconfigured or misbehaving home network devices.

IPv4 uses a 32-bit (four-byte) address, limiting the number of available unique addresses to 4,294,967,296. However, some of these addresses have been reserved for private networks, limiting the available public addresses. IPv6 uses a 128-bit address, allowing for approximately 3.4 x 10^38, enough public addresses to last us a lifetime.

Available IPv4 addresses are now in the final 2%, with just 91 million addresses left. These publicly available Internet addresses are expected to completely be gone in the next 32 days.

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^ estimations on IP availabilities are worthless.

at the current rate of IP's being assigned we would run out in a day, the lucky thing is there are lots expiring dropping back into the pot..

We have essentially already maxed our capabilities so IPv6 is needed ASAP

Virgin (Goatee Branson) Media say... We no not have any plans as of yet as this is a new technology and when it come availbe Virgin Media make an announcement to their customers.

New technology, it's not new, I was made aware of IPv4 running out of IP addressees in 2000, IPv6 is not new. the fact that, I do believe there are approximate 4.3 million IP addressees left and it's estimated that it will run out in 2 years.

Your readiness scores
10/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
10/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

The countdown is just until all IP blocks have been assigned to an owner. it does not mean that the worls is actually out of IP addresses.

hdood said,
The countdown is just until all IP blocks have been assigned to an owner. it does not mean that the worls is actually out of IP addresses.

No, but it means the root source of IPv4 addresses has run out. As an example, it's like the Earth running out of oil (which is something that is also probably going to occur in my lifetime). Sure, there is still lots of oil in refineries and refined products at petrol/gas stations, but there will never again be any fresh supplies of oil to those refineries, and therefore shortly afterwards no more petrol/gas deliveries to stations either. As such the cost of petrol/gas will go up based purely on supply and demand, just as the cost of IPv4 addresses will go up with ISPs charging more for static addresses.

hdood said,
The countdown is just until all IP blocks have been assigned to an owner. it does not mean that the worls is actually out of IP addresses.

That's right.. and the internet isn't just going to stop functioning when the limit is reached!

What ever happened to IPv5? IPv6 is but viral IETF marketing. The cake is a lie. IPv6 is a lie. I'm far safe in my NAT world.

Breach said,
What ever happened to IPv5? IPv6 is but viral IETF marketing. The cake is a lie. IPv6 is a lie. I'm far safe in my NAT world.

IPv5 never became an official standard, but it would be Internet Stream Protocol. Were skipping it for IPv6

Also getting rid of your "NAT world" is one of the great things of IPv6. NAT is slow and limits the maximum number of connections possible. Especially as we run lower on IPv4 address ISPs will start having to put you behind a NAT, no real IP address to contact is a huge negative. Also being behind multiple NATs is NEVER fun.

IP6 is for more than just an increase of IP addresses, but again... the many noobs here fail to understand this.

Chasethebase said,
My university is gonna be poopin' brix when the time comes.

Why, if they already have IP addresses then there is no problem. It is a problem for when new people/organisations want addresses.

Xenomorph said,
If IPv6 has more addresses than we could ever use, why not shorten it to make addresses easier to identify/remember?
IPv6 does have a shorthand notation to avoid unnecessarily long addresses.

http://knowledgelayer.softlayer.com/questions/459/IPv6+overview

Ignoring padded 0s, it's difficult to come up with patterns that wouldn't otherwise be removing information from the address, and thus changing it. Unfortunately, it would defeat the purpose of lengthening the address.

sgt.banjo said,
I wanna be a duodecillionaire, so frikkin baaad.....

I shudder to think what the inflation level would have to be

Your readiness scores
9/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
7/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

Although I cheated, my ISP doesn't offer IPv6 yet :-(
Your IPv6 service appears to be: he.net. or tunnelbroker.net < Using tunnelled Ipv6 for now.

Being in IT, I think with IPv6 it's safe to say we'll have enough addresses for a while. Every single human on the planet could have 5.66666667 × 10^28 addresses assigned to it before the address space would be exhausted. I don't think I'll have that many devices. Ever. Guess it's time to go get up to speed on IPv6...

seta-san said,
i'll keep using IPv4 for my internal network as a matter of simplicity.

should have typed "as a matter of comfort." IPv6, as a protocol is much more simple to implement and administer than IPv4. v4 has become so complicated and convoluted.

once IT admins are comfortable w/ IPv6, we'll wonder what we ever did w/o it.

seta-san said,
i'll keep using IPv4 for my internal network as a matter of simplicity.

Why? You will be defeating the whole purpose of IPv6. My suggestion is when you are actually able to go truly v6 (and not just tunneled)... dump all of IPv4.

desitunez said,
They should stop IP4 for that day , to force ISP's and businesses to realize and move on it quickly

Here, candy.

"allowing for approximately 3.4 x 10^38, enough public addresses to last us a lifetime."

I've heard that before :-) Nothing ever lasts a lifetime in IT.

Odom said,
"allowing for approximately 3.4 x 10^38, enough public addresses to last us a lifetime."

I've heard that before :-) Nothing ever lasts a lifetime in IT.

Don't worry, this one will.

Quigley Guy said,
Dont be so sure

There are more addresses than grams of matter in the earth, and more addresses than atoms on its surface. Until mankind has spread throughout the universe, I don't see a problem.

10/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
10/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

however my ISP is not offering IPv6 yet (its in beta testing atm), but im manualy runing IPv6 tunnel over Sixxs.

uk virgin media ISP:

7/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
0/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

Virgin Media for me:

7/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
7/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

I'm also on Virgin Media (UK) and get the same as Lousifer. However, that's only if I connect the cable modem directly to the PC's network port. If I go via my (frankly rubbish) router I get the same result as torrentthief. Obviously I need a new router.

7/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
0/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

I suck even at IPv4

Glendi said,
7/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
0/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

I suck even at IPv4

I got the same results as you.

"IPv6 uses a 128-bit address, allowing for approximately 3.4 x 10^38, enough public addresses to last us a lifetime."

I bet you that's what they said when IPv4 first came out.

Mkvos said,
"IPv6 uses a 128-bit address, allowing for approximately 3.4 x 10^38, enough public addresses to last us a lifetime."

I bet you that's what they said when IPv4 first came out.

IPv4 was designed before the internet was expected to reach user level, let alone mobile devices and having the majority of the worlds population using it!

I don't think we'll find the same problem with IPv6.

"whereas IPv6 supports up to about 3.4 × 1038 (3.4 duodecillion) addresses"

I also heard a theory that every grain of sand in the sahara desert could effectively have a unique address.

To put it into context.

10 to power of 38 is a duodecillion.
10 to the power of 12 is a trillion
Oh and it's 3.4 time a doudecillion

honestly, think every galaxy and planet contained within could have a unique IP!

Mkvos said,
"IPv6 uses a 128-bit address, allowing for approximately 3.4 x 10^38, enough public addresses to last us a lifetime."

I bet you that's what they said when IPv4 first came out.

340 quintillion. That's 340,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 addresses verses 4,300,000,000.

Mkvos said,
"IPv6 uses a 128-bit address, allowing for approximately 3.4 x 10^38, enough public addresses to last us a lifetime."

I bet you that's what they said when IPv4 first came out.

well that was still 37 years ago

xXTOKERXx said,

I also heard a theory that every grain of sand in the sahara desert could effectively have a unique address.

That analogy isn't even close! Try this: We could assign an address to every atom on the Earth's surface and still use only 1/100th of the total address space. It is enough to assign trillions of addresses to every human being on the planet.

People fail to comprehend how large that number truly is. It is completely impossible for us to run out of IPv6 addresses.

Siddharth Prabhu said,

That analogy isn't even close! Try this: We could assign an address to every atom on the Earth's surface and still use only 1/100th of the total address space. It is enough to assign trillions of addresses to every human being on the planet.

People fail to comprehend how large that number truly is. It is completely impossible for us to run out of IPv6 addresses.


Damn!! really is hard to imagine how big it must be.

I remember first hearing of a billionaire and couldn't fathom that sum of money and this is "SO MUCH FURTHER" away

Siddharth Prabhu said,

It is completely impossible for us to run out of IPv6 addresses.

Wellll.... not quite impossible, but for all intents and purposes

Siddharth Prabhu said,

That analogy isn't even close! Try this: We could assign an address to every atom on the Earth's surface and still use only 1/100th of the total address space. It is enough to assign trillions of addresses to every human being on the planet.

People fail to comprehend how large that number truly is. It is completely impossible for us to run out of IPv6 addresses.

How do you define what is or isn't on the Earth's surface?

Siddharth Prabhu said,

That analogy isn't even close! Try this: We could assign an address to every atom on the Earth's surface and still use only 1/100th of the total address space. It is enough to assign trillions of addresses to every human being on the planet.

People fail to comprehend how large that number truly is. It is completely impossible for us to run out of IPv6 addresses.

Your analogy isn't worth much either without more definition. A better analogy would be assigning 9 billion addresses to every grain of sand in the sahara.

(That's an american billion, which is different from a billion in some other countries... a thousand million.)

cybertimber2008 said,
340 quintillion. That's 340,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 addresses verses 4,300,000,000.

You're forgot to add three more zeros. That's a LOT!
340 ,000,000,000 ,000,000,000 ,000,000,000 ,000,000,000

0/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
10/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

7/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
0/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

Thanks to our Belgian monopoly of Belgacom

All good over here.
9/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
7/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

7/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
0/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

Yippee...

I've got 3 internet lines at work in Tulsa, OK:

AT&T DSL, Cox Cable, and EasyTel Fiber. All three got 7/10 IPv4, 0/10 IPv6.

Interestingly enough, on the Cox line, it says that they are using Teredo, a IPv4/IPv6 gateway. So we've got a public IPv6 address, but can't reach IPv6 websites by name(but can by number)

Hurricane Andrew said,
7/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
0/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

Yippee...

Same here but I'm sitting on a corporate network that owns a class A block, so I can't say I'm surprised. I'll check my personal connection tonight at home.

A.S.W said,
0/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
10/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

How'd you manage that?

vaximily said,

How'd you manage that?


I don't know how IPVx works, but that's what I have...
I know that my ISP offers IPV6, but 0 of IPV4 surprised me too.

Comcast cable here in the Bay Area of California, USA.

7/10 IPv4
0/10 IPv6


EDIT: Might be my router, or Comcast might just suck.

Breach said,
I think the Belgian idea of competition is to slice the cake per commune is all...

Belgacom and Telenet will certainly wait until the very last moment before investing to offer ipv6

tiagosilva29 said,
"My ISP doesn't care about IPv6."

http://test-ipv6.com/


7/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
7/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

10/10 for your IPv4 stability and readiness, when publishers offer both IPv4 and IPv6
10/10 for your IPv6 stability and readiness, when publishers are forced to go IPv6 only

Hell, even my Android phone and my iPod Touch get 10/10 for both.

Most ISP's will milk IPv4 until the very death before they decide it is time to dip their fingers in their pockets and implement IPv6, it should have been dealt with and much more widespread than current, two years ago! Now most ISP's have left it a little too late I feel.

Inklin said,
Most ISP's will milk IPv4 until the very death before they decide it is time to dip their fingers in their pockets and implement IPv6, it should have been dealt with and much more widespread than current, two years ago! Now most ISP's have left it a little too late I feel.

I'm darn happy I still have dynamic-IPs by that!
So whatever their motivation is... even if they're just cheapskates: THANK YOU!

GS:mac

Inklin said,
Most ISP's will milk IPv4 until the very death before they decide it is time to dip their fingers in their pockets and implement IPv6, it should have been dealt with and much more widespread than current, two years ago! Now most ISP's have left it a little too late I feel.

they are not in rush because it will only mean downtime for users

their $$$ won't be at risk

IPv6 is only if you have an IPv6 address availble, not everyone does (VM customers being one) and it's on June 8 2011 according to the internet society link posted.

Human nature really, this should have been done years ago but nobody really cared about the move to ipv6 until the ipv4 addresses have almost run out.
Its like that person in the office who leaves printing that important meeting document until just before the meeting only to find the printer is broken and then blames everyone else.
<sigh> at least there is movement of some sort now I guess

Teebor said,
Human nature really, this should have been done years ago but nobody really cared about the move to ipv6 until the ipv4 addresses have almost run out.
Its like that person in the office who leaves printing that important meeting document until just before the meeting only to find the printer is broken and then blames everyone else.
<sigh> at least there is movement of some sort now I guess

How true. It seems that we wait for the last possible moment before he advert the crisis. When of these days it's going to be too late and we are going to have to pay the price. The good news is I expect that this will be solved at the 11th hour.

Teebor said,
Human nature really, this should have been done years ago but nobody really cared about the move to ipv6 until the ipv4 addresses have almost run out.
Its like that person in the office who leaves printing that important meeting document until just before the meeting only to find the printer is broken and then blames everyone else.
<sigh> at least there is movement of some sort now I guess

that's pretty much the truth.

Pupik said,
After all these years, do they really need these test? And I know Google have been running http://ipv6.google.com for almost two years now, without any problems.

Guess not, Oops! Google Chrome could not find ipv6.google.com

Pupik said,
After all these years, do they really need these test? And I know Google have been running http://ipv6.google.com for almost two years now, without any problems.

FYI, at lot of Google services are available through IPv6 including gmail, docs, and youtube.

And yes, unfortunately, these tests are necessary, as is "whitelisting" of ISPs. Some ISPs and users are using broken equipment such that enabling AAAA records will break resolution of regular AA records. Last I heard, the fraction of users affected is <1%, but that's still a very large number of users.

NesTle said,

... no because his ISP is not IPv6...


youre right - i dont know of a single US-based ISP that has native support for IPv6 yet. i talked to mine (Time Warner) back in november and they said they were just going to start rollouts this year. they wouldnt even give me any other details.

Subject Delta said,

Apparently I don't even have an ipv6 address with Virgin Media according to that site.


I do, but I'm not ipv6 ready according to the site. And I'm also on Virgin Media.
Go figure?

Google and facebook have supported IPv6 for a long time. I used IPv6 to connect to facebook a little while ago when IPv4 facebook went off the air for half a day.