World's largest video game collection sold for a staggering $750,250

Earlier this month, we reported on Michael Thomasson, the official holder of the Guinness World Record for the largest video game collection in the world. With over 11,000 games - many of them still shrink-wrapped - the collection included titles from a dazzling array of systems as diverse as the BBC Micro, Sony PSP, Commodore 64, Neo-Geo, all three Xbox generations, and dozens more. 

But as proud as he was of his collection, Thomasson put the whole lot up for auction, in order to use the proceeds to support his family. When we published our article on June 7, bids were approaching $100,000, but in the days that followed, they just kept on climbing. 

As Engadget reports today, bidding has now ended (a couple of days ago, in fact - but we were all a bit busy playing video games to notice), and the bids certainly escalated since we last looked in. The auction was won by an anonymous bidder, who has agreed to pay an immense $750,250 for the collection. 

Aside from wondering who was willing to part with such a massive sum, there's one important question that still remains unanswered: just how much were the delivery charges? 

Source: Engadget / GameGavel | image via Michael Thomasson / GameGavel.com 

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22 Comments

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With all that money he could do nice things... like getting a life and a girl, or paying for therapy for his addiction ;-)

Which part? The family part (i guess, it is normal to have a family *g*). Or the part with his addiction?
"he remains optimistic that he may yet be able to build his collection once more: "No worries, I've sold my collection many times in the past and still managed to capture Guinness' attention, and it is entirely possible that I may again.""

Not sure how much time he spend on the collecting (if not counting playtime at all), while quite the investment (wish I had the money), he still made quite a nice amount of money.
No way he averaged out at more then 60bucks per game.

Suq MADIQ said,
now he can afford to go out on a date

Actually says in the article he sold the collection to support his family - so I'd assume he's married with kids.

anothercookie said,
what if he lives in his moms basement?

If you watched the video, you'd see that's not the case and he's clearly a guy who owns a house with a family :)

Yeah, probably sadly. it's like they tax you to buy the crap and then tax you once you sell it. don't make sense to me :(

he should be able to keep 100% of the money in my mind.

ThaCrip said,
Yeah, probably sadly. it's like they tax you to buy the crap and then tax you once you sell it. don't make sense to me :(

he should be able to keep 100% of the money in my mind.

Actually they tax the seller who sold you the crap and then when you become the seller you get taxed. That being said it is ridiculous in the end...

DrOmango said,
nice, but how much after tax when reported to irs? he will keep %60 of the income.

You ONLY get taxed on the income.. aka net gain... if he paid $400k+ for all that he only gets taxed on the $350k ish in profit... only annoying thing is he has to be able to prove what he paid for ALL of that to claim it as an expense not a gain...

DrOmango said,
nice, but how much after tax when reported to irs? he will keep %60 of the income.

Only keep 60%? Of course not. This isn't regular income. He'll only pay 15% on the gain. If he paid $200,000 building that collection, he'd only pay about $82,000, which is closer to 11% of the sale price, meaning he keeps 89%.

neufuse said,

You ONLY get taxed on the income.. aka net gain... if he paid $400k+ for all that he only gets taxed on the $350k ish in profit... only annoying thing is he has to be able to prove what he paid for ALL of that to claim it as an expense not a gain...

There are ways to do that. Obviously he has them and he didn't steal them so therefore he must have paid something for them... Not sure. Maybe the IRS could assess most of them as being valued as next to worthless (and individually I suspect a lot of the titles are) then call the vast majority profit. Bunch of slime bags.