Xbox One console torn down by iFixit; repairability good

The Xbox One may only be officially on sale in two countries in the world at the moment (Australia and New Zealand) but the gadget repair site iFixit has already gotten their hands on Microsoft's next generation console and subjected it to its teardown procedure.

The final result? The Xbox One gets an 8 out of 10 repairability score. The site claims it only takes a few tools to tear down the console and its design allows for parts like the drives, fan, heat sink, wireless card, and front board to be replaced with little trouble.

The one really bad thing about the Xbox One, according to iFixit, is its hard drive. We knew already that the 500GB storage drive was made to be a permanent part of the console and iFixit confirms that it is "relatively difficult to access". While the Xbox One has a "standard 2.5 inch SATA II drive" iFixit says it may be formatted with a proprietary file system. Considering that Microsoft is not giving Xbox One users a way to manage their file storage on their own in favor of an "automatic" system, this should not come as a surprise.

By the way, the same website torn down an Xbox 360 E console and gave it an 8 out of 10 repairability rating as well.

Source: iFixit | Image via iFixit

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Spicoli said,

Only if you're trained on how to do it and have the equipment. The only end user serviceable parts in my fridge is the water filter.

What, you can't even change the light bulb without a service call? LOL

cleverclogs said,
Is it really? Oh my!
I get the feeling most next gen wifi chipsets support miracast. I'd be very excited to hear MS say XBox could be a target.

The worst repair for Xbox One will be when someone's VHS tape gets eaten up inside and someone has to clean the heads.

There's a TON of empty space in that thing. I wonder why they didn't make the hard drive removable like on the 360 S and E models.

I can only speculate on their thinking, but it seems like they believe you won't need to with the hierarchical storage management and unlimited skydrive and making it removable adds to the price which is already the highest for a console.

Spicoli said,
I can only speculate on their thinking, but it seems like they believe you won't need to with the hierarchical storage management and unlimited skydrive and making it removable adds to the price which is already the highest for a console.

The hard drive is already remove-able; they intentionally locked down the file management option and put it in a hard to reach spot.

Spicoli said,
I can only speculate on their thinking, but it seems like they believe you won't need to with the hierarchical storage management and unlimited skydrive and making it removable adds to the price which is already the highest for a console.

But that's all crap anyways with the ****ty internet speed most people have. Assume you have 400GB free after formatting and what is reserved. That is only 13 30GB games. It'll be annoying if you suddenly want to play a game that is no longer on your hard drive, especially if you downloaded it instead of getting it on disc. They said they'll support installing games to USB storage in the future, but that is more of a hassle than just putting a 2TB drive into the Xbox.

Gerowen said,

The hard drive is already remove-able; they intentionally locked down the file management option and put it in a hard to reach spot.

Yeah it is technically removable if you open up the system and void your warranty. Obviously they won't be using a proprietary hard drive, there's no reason to waste money like that. I'm wondering why they didn't make it user-replaceable which is pretty obvious from context.

Gerowen said,

The hard drive is already remove-able; they intentionally locked down the file management option and put it in a hard to reach spot.


That's false. Automatic storage management is an upgrade to an enterprise class feature and not a "lock down" to anything. I understand many people aren't familiar with these type of features since they've been mostly on million dollar systems, but it will be the standard in just a few years. People will look at manual file management like they look at dial up modems and floppy disks now.

Spicoli said,

That's false. Automatic storage management is an upgrade to an enterprise class feature and not a "lock down" to anything. I understand many people aren't familiar with these type of features since they've been mostly on million dollar systems, but it will be the standard in just a few years. People will look at manual file management like they look at dial up modems and floppy disks now.

Uh. What? It doesn't let you choose what is on your hard drive. I don't think any enterprise data management solution doesn't let you choose what to keep and what not to.

mrp04 said,

Uh. What? It doesn't let you choose what is on your hard drive. I don't think any enterprise data management solution doesn't let you choose what to keep and what not to.

You'll understand once you use it.

Spicoli said,

You'll understand once you use it.

I don't think I will. I'll be upset if it dumps the least recently used game off the drive and then I decide I want to play it and then have to wait an hour or two for it to download enough to start up.

does anyone wonder why ifixit -didn't- remove the hard drive and confirm the file system?
I'm guessing that drive failure is handled by automatic-enterprise system quickly and effortlessly too.

Yeah I did. Fortunately if you read the article now, they mention the structure of the HDD.

For the lazy, it's an NTFS HDD with multiple partitions. Also keep in mind, instead of plugging it into a Windows machine, they used a mac, so the capacities are measured differently.

Romero said,
So can't the file system be replicated on a bigger off the shelf drive?

If you do a clone and only resize the user data partition, I don't see why not. I have no idea at all whether it'd work though.

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