Xbox One owners reporting audio sync issues with Blu-ray movies at 24Hz

As we mentioned in our review of the Xbox One, the console requires that users download a Blu-ray player app before it is able to play a movie. Now it seems a number of owners of Microsoft's newest console are reporting issues when playing DVD or Blu-ray movies.

The Xbox support forums has a rather lengthy post on the matter. Specifically, the problems are tied into the audio not syncing to the video when the 24Hz refresh rate is turned on. Turning this option off apparently fixes the problem but there are many users who would prefer to play Blu-ray discs with the 24Hz refresh rate.

Some users have reported that turning the Xbox One off and then turning it back on seems to solve the issue for them, but this solution did not work for other forum members. One Xbox One owner wrote he wanted Microsoft to fix this problem ASAP. He stated:

If this is not done soon I will be forced sell up and buy a certain competitors device.  The ability to be able to play a simple blu rays (sic) properly - which works fine on basic PC's and another slightly older console (!) - is a need for me.

The only post from a Microsoft Support team member on this thread was made on December 10th, when he suggested that users uninstall and reinstall the Blu-ray app. He added, "We will continue to look into this issue and bring to light what we can dig up." Other forum members claim they have talked with Microsoft support personnel who have told them they are aware of the problem and that they are "... looking forward to fixing this issue (at) the soonest possible time."

Thanks to Neowin reader Elan Gabriel for tipping us to this story via email!

Source: Xbox forums | Image via Blu-ray.com

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Update from today; The MS support team reported that their (Microsoft) hardware specialists are checking for the root of the problem, and will issue a fix the soonest they can.

Seriously...? After the 50/60Hz passthrough issue in europe they've managed to **** up 24p playback?

Did they hire engineers for this thing or did they just toss in random PC parts and hope it works?

note : 24p support is mandatory on the player and TV/Receiver to have perfectly smooth BD playback (or any 23.97fps source in that regard)

... he suggested that users uninstall and reinstall the Blu-ray app.

I got a better fix: connect an external Blu-ray player or PS4 to the Xbone's HDMI passthrough. No reinstalling apps necessary!

No, then it would be playing 24Hz content at 60Hz since the Xbox One doesn't switch out of 60Hz mode for the HDMI passthrough, as has been determined by the people with 50Hz cable boxes being displayed at 60Hz.

> Turning this option off apparently fixes the problem but there are many users who would prefer to play Blu-ray discs with the 24Hz refresh rate

So, enlighten us, almighty videophiles, what's the alternative to 24Hz and why does it make the movies unplayable for you?

Are we actually talking about the 23.976 vs 29.97 frame rate? I would think that if you're such a ****ing perfectionist, you'd already have better equipment hooked up to your AV system, would you not?

I would be interested in seeing if people can even pick out 24 vs 60 in a blind view test. The only thing I don't like is that motion smoothing on 120hz and higher LCD TVs that make everything look cheesy. In any case, the audio should stay synchronized in all modes.

Movies are filmed at 24fps. If you have a 120Hz TV and play content at 24hz each frame will be displayed for exactly 5 refreshes (120/24). If you are using 60hz some frames will be displayed for 2 refreshes and others will be displayed for 3 which is not as smooth. If you have a 120hz TV and play back at 60hz it will just double the frames, so some will be displayed for 4 refreshes and others at 6, so motion will not be as smooth. Look up 2:3 pulldown if you would like to be enlightened.

giantpotato said,
Movies are filmed at 24fps. If you have a 120Hz TV and play content at 24hz each frame will be displayed for exactly 5 refreshes (120/24). If you are using 60hz some frames will be displayed for 2 refreshes and others will be displayed for 3 which is not as smooth. If you have a 120hz TV and play back at 60hz it will just double the frames, so some will be displayed for 4 refreshes and others at 6, so motion will not be as smooth. Look up 2:3 pulldown if you would like to be enlightened.

+1

Additional note for others reading this...

It is implied in giantpotato's response, but just to be clear, if your TV/Display only supports 60Hz, this setting is irrelevant.

Users with 120Hz and higher refresh displays can possibly notice the difference, although most users probably won't notice the difference.

Most people are conditioned to 24Hz movies playing on older 29Hz displays without ever noticing the extra frames.

As for the XB1 issue Microsoft needs to fix this ASAP. -No excuses.

giantpotato said,
Movies are filmed at 24fps. If you have a 120Hz TV and play content at 24hz each frame will be displayed for exactly 5 refreshes (120/24). If you are using 60hz some frames will be displayed for 2 refreshes and others will be displayed for 3 which is not as smooth. If you have a 120hz TV and play back at 60hz it will just double the frames, so some will be displayed for 4 refreshes and others at 6, so motion will not be as smooth. Look up 2:3 pulldown if you would like to be enlightened.

There's absolutely nothing mentioned in there I didn't already know about. And I stand by my statement--if you're the type who already knows about this and also actually cares about it, then you probably have better equipment that can do a better job of it already, so to me it makes no sense to cheap out and use a gaming console to watch BluRays if you're gonna want to have control over such settings. That's why AV racks are...well, racks...and are designed to accommodate more than one device.

The Xbox One is supposed to do all the entertainment stuff properly so you don't have to switch inputs anymore. MS pitched it on national TV barely mentioning games, they expect people to pick it up as an entertainment device. If you can get cheaper equipment that does a better job, it defeats their proposition.

The XBOne is supposedly meant to be a multimedia device, not just a gaming device. It's still a joke that a £500 machine can't even handle different video rates properly, that's basic functionality. When you pitch a device as a multimedia device you damn well better make sure it handles multimedia properly.

_dandy_ said,
> Turning this option off apparently fixes the problem but there are many users who would prefer to play Blu-ray discs with the 24Hz refresh rate

So, enlighten us, almighty videophiles, what's the alternative to 24Hz and why does it make the movies unplayable for you?

Are we actually talking about the 23.976 vs 29.97 frame rate? I would think that if you're such a ****ing perfectionist, you'd already have better equipment hooked up to your AV system, would you not?

Why being so negative ?

It's a broken feature of the console. It has 24Hz check box, but when it's checked - the audio goes out of sync. If it's not checked, the audio is just slightly off-sync, but the video has jitters.

It might not be important to you, but for some of us it is. It's not life or death, but I rather have a fully working BD playback experience.

24Hz refresh rate correlate with the fact that movies on BD are native 24fps. It gives you a smoother video experience.

The fact that I care about it, doesn't mean that I must own expensive gear.

_dandy_ said,

There's absolutely nothing mentioned in there I didn't already know about. And I stand by my statement--if you're the type who already knows about this and also actually cares about it, then you probably have better equipment that can do a better job of it already, so to me it makes no sense to cheap out and use a gaming console to watch BluRays if you're gonna want to have control over such settings. That's why AV racks are...well, racks...and are designed to accommodate more than one device.

_dandy_ said,

So, enlighten us, almighty videophiles, what's the alternative to 24Hz and why does it make the movies unplayable for you?
.

If you already understood what the problem with 60hz is, why are you asking what the problem is?

Your argument doesn't really make sense. Out of sync audio is clearly a bug with the XBOX one, it doesn't matter if someone has better equipment. It's like you're saying if there was a flaw in XBOX's internet browser it shouldn't matter because anyone browsing the internet should have working internet on their PC.

If there was a flaw in XBOX Skype it shouldn't matter because true Skype users have Skype functioning on their mobile devices.

etc.

_dandy_ said,

There's absolutely nothing mentioned in there I didn't already know about. And I stand by my statement--if you're the type who already knows about this and also actually cares about it, then you probably have better equipment that can do a better job of it already, so to me it makes no sense to cheap out and use a gaming console to watch BluRays if you're gonna want to have control over such settings. That's why AV racks are...well, racks...and are designed to accommodate more than one device.


With that logic, then why even get an xbox "one"? Why cheap out and use a gaming console to play games when PC's do it so much better.

giantpotato said,
If you already understood what the problem with 60hz is, why are you asking what the problem is?

I was incredulously asking whether that was actually the problem people are bitching about. I understand that problem, I just couldn't be sure the problem being discussed here is one and the same.

giantpotato said,
Your argument doesn't really make sense. Out of sync audio is clearly a bug with the XBOX one, it doesn't matter if someone has better equipment.

Meh. I'm just being reminded of Sony's solution to things not working too well. Remember the PS3's ability to run Linux? I'm just thinking, if it works, great...if it's quirky, well...I don't think they promised anyone support would be there for it and it would be flawless. And you know what? I'm sure it'll actually be fixed and it won't cost anyone a dime.

giantpotato said,
It's like you're saying if there was a flaw in XBOX's internet browser it shouldn't matter because anyone browsing the internet should have working internet on their PC.

My folks have a TV that includes a web browser. Most sites are broken with it, not to mention the fact that browsing the internet with a TV sucks. I'm not under the impression the TV manufacturer is gonna keep pushing out browser updates until it's flawless. Even if they did, it's still a TV and it's not well suited for browsing the web to begin with.

giantpotato said,
If there was a flaw in XBOX Skype it shouldn't matter because true Skype users have Skype functioning on their mobile devices.etc.

If my experience with some software is suboptimal on a certain device, but I have another device that can do a better job of it, I'm gonna use the device that provides the better experience.

Just as with your Xbox browser example, just because it CAN doesn't mean it's going to be ideal.

People see these devices that are being pushed for multiple purposes, and they think those purposes are going to be served in the best way possible with that one device and they can get rid of their other devices that do one thing only and do it better. It's really a matter of expectations. Personally I call it using the right tool for the right job.

I call the whole damned thing a first world problem, that's for sure.

George P said,
The bluray playback is a app, should be easy to fix.

It's an underlying issue since it affects all 24hz rendering.

Just ask european cable users who see this issue with live TV.

It's not as simple as fixing the app, there needs to be some context switching at the driver level.

Mr. Hand said,
People still watch movies off optical disks?

Quality-wise nothing comes close to Bluray, unless you're going to download the 40GB per movie rips.

Ambroos said,

Quality-wise nothing comes close to Bluray, unless you're going to download the 40GB per movie rips.

Or selection. Streaming services are just awful.

God I love this. Every time there is a problem with the Xbox itself, we manage to turn the problem around onto the user.

Kalint said,
God I love this. Every time there is a problem with the Xbox itself, we manage to turn the problem around onto the user.

Yep, from the same folks who spent years mocking Steve Jobs for "you're xxx-ing it wrong!"

Mr. Hand said,
People still watch movies off optical disks?

Yes, I doand I watch what I want, when I want and I do not depend on any third parties to get access to what I paid.

Ambroos said,

Quality-wise nothing comes close to Bluray, unless you're going to download the 40GB per movie rips.

Bluray Remux AVC DTS-HD MA 7.1 ~20GB

mrdeezus said,
Uh yes something does, VUDU. Yes bluray is slightly better but unless you know what to look for very hard to tell....

The picture quality of Vudu HDX is very good and gives Blu-ray a run for its money. AFIAK the best audio Vudu offers is still DD+ still.

Kalint said,
God I love this. Every time there is a problem with the Xbox itself, we manage to turn the problem around onto the user.

I am regularly attacked by people on Neowin because I make broad generalizations, taking a comment or two that a handful of people on the internet make, and applying it to all Apple/Linux/Google/etc. users.

But then someone makes a comment that repeats one of those common memes, then suddenly all users of a site are Microsoft apologists (even though day by day it is turning into a Microsoft hate fest full of click-bait negative articles), people will stop at nothing to defend Microsoft, blah, blah, blah.

WhatTheSchmidt said,

I am regularly attacked by people on Neowin because I make broad generalizations, taking a comment or two that a handful of people on the internet make, and applying it to all Apple/Linux/Google/etc. users.

But then someone makes a comment that repeats one of those common memes, then suddenly all users of a site are Microsoft apologists (even though day by day it is turning into a Microsoft hate fest full of click-bait negative articles), people will stop at nothing to defend Microsoft, blah, blah, blah.

That's a rather broad generalization don't you think?

Lord Method Man said,

Or selection. Streaming services are just awful.

Have you checked out the streaming tests of Xbox Video at 1080p? If you have enough bandwidth, it is often less compressed than a BluRay or equal, especially if they are both using Microsoft's VC1.

Ambroos said,

Quality-wise nothing comes close to Bluray, unless you're going to download the 40GB per movie rips.

Umm... If you take the time you can get that down to 20GB fairly easily with no quality loss and maybe even less. I did a 20GB rip once and that was relatively raw. Recompressed it to 8GB with no visual loss at all. It even retained the audio track in full (it was untouched) and the resolution was the same as well.

Kalint said,
God I love this. Every time there is a problem with the Xbox itself, we manage to turn the problem around onto the user.
as a former tech support guy I can vouch for 75 percent of the time most tech issues are the users' fault