Xoom: This could be the MotoPad Android 3.0 tablet

Motorola’s flagship Android tablet device might be called “Xoom”. While it is most likely pronounced  “zoom,” no authority has spoken on the matter, and we may have to wait for CES 2011 to find the answer to that question. Motorola has been very busy the last few months, according to PocketNow, applying for trademarks all over the globe for a device called Xoom. As of now, the name will be protected in the US, Canada, the EU, Australia, New Zealand, and an application is pending in Taiwan. Based on the variety of countries this device is protected in – and Motorola is not known for trademark spamming – PocketNow is willing to bet that this is Motorola’s Android tablet expected at CES 2011. If true, it will be the first tablet to run Google’s Android 3.0 “Honeycomb” OS, which is specific to the tablet and slate form factors.

As Android tablets continue to try and take a bite out of the iPad’s market share, they continue to face an uphill battle. Apple gained a clear advantage by moving their product out way ahead of the pack, releasing it as part of an already wildly successful brand image, and made it user-friendly and affordable to boot. The market loves all these things, and Android needs to catch up. Google plans on making Android 3.0 their first dedicated push into the tablet market, and Motorola could once again become the flagship manufacturer that leads Android to viable competition. We saw the same story unfold with the Motorola Droid line of smartphones, when the Droid became the mainstream device that catapulted the Android OS into the hearts and homes of the average consumer, and this could very well be the next chapter in that relationship.

Image Credit: gadgetupd8

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It looks great, no logo or branding and no visible buttons. For a device that can be held in any direction I think this is an important design decision.

still1 said,
interested to see its price.

Archos has a passable device under $300 - if you get the one with a smaller amount of storage. It's no galaxy tab, but it certainly has a nice sized screen.

If it doesn't run Windows applications, I don't see the point of any tablet. I own an iPad and it's a toy. I love using it to browse the web when I'm watching TV and it's bloody brilliant to take with me on a long plane flight, but otherwise it's just a flash game delivery vehicle...without flash. 8P

excalpius said,
If it doesn't run Windows applications, I don't see the point of any tablet.

You seem to have a pretty narrow-minded view of what is useful. I feel pretty sorry for you if your entire world revolves around Windows apps.

Yes... A device with no keyboard or mouse should run applications designed to be used with a keyboard and mouse. Sounds like a winner to me! I mean, it's not like there's already been a ton of Windows "tablets" that have failed miserably. OH WAIT.

iKenndac said,
Yes... A device with no keyboard or mouse should run applications designed to be used with a keyboard and mouse. Sounds like a winner to me! I mean, it's not like there's already been a ton of Windows "tablets" that have failed miserably. OH WAIT.

I think you missed the whole point of a TOUCH device...

roadwarrior said,

You seem to have a pretty narrow-minded view of what is useful. I feel pretty sorry for you if your entire world revolves around Windows apps.

Enlighten me then. Name something "useful" I can run on my iPad. The only thing I can find so far would be TeamViewer. Everything else is either a mini-game or applet.

For example, since the iPad doesn't have cameras, it sure eliminates a lot of uses.

excalpius said,

For example, since the iPad doesn't have cameras, it sure eliminates a lot of uses.
Well, it eliminates the possibility of video calling and picture taking... so 2 uses.

As for its usefulness, it really is designed for content consumption, not creation. If you're a content creator, then its usefulness won't be on the same level as that of a PC. However, if you are just a consumer (and most computer users are), or even create a limited amount of content, the iPad can act as, essentially, a full fledged computer. It's all in the eye of the beholder... my iPad is, admittedly, used more as a toy in comparison to my computer, but that's why I bought it. It's for fun, while my computer is for work.

nekkidtruth said,

So?

Well, they might run into trademark issues for one thing. And do they really want to be associated with the former (or current) business of Xoom? Not only that, but people looking for information on the device will likely end up on the payment processing site instead of the device's site.

roadwarrior said,

Well, they might run into trademark issues for one thing. And do they really want to be associated with the former (or current) business of Xoom? Not only that, but people looking for information on the device will likely end up on the payment processing site instead of the device's site.

Very different, within days Xoom as payment processing will be gone in search terms.

Andre said,

Different markets, let alone the xoom you posted has nothing to do with hardware at all.

Exactly. This is similar to what just happened when that guy tried to sue Google for using "Android" as the name.