Yahoo Music to offer refunds, what about MSN?

Yahoo Music is offering refunds to anyone who bought songs from the service. Is it time for MSN Music follow Yahoo's lead?

Yahoo announced last week that it would no longer issue authorization keys for the digital rights management, or DRM, software on its songs. This meant that anyone who bought songs from the service would still be able to hear their songs through its service but would be unable to move them to other devices or computers.

This did not play well with Web users. Now Yahoo Music plans to issue refunds and is trying to go one step further. If a customer would prefer music over a refund, Yahoo is looking for a way to give the customer copies of the purchased songs in the DRM-free MP3 format, according to a Yahoo representative.

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17 Comments

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Was I the only one who saw this as the silver bullet in securing the death of DRM when it was first introduced? This folks is why I didly I buy CDs, they'll still play long after RIAA members all go broke.

Once again, why not just release a tool to strip the DRM from the songs? Or offer song to song downloads (as in, you own this DRM-ed version of song A, so now you can download, for free, this DRM free version of song A)? Seems to me like they *want* to lose money.

I have purchased literally hundreds of DRM-free mp3s from Amazon over the past year or so. It shows that RIAA is on the wrong track. This recent move by Yahoo, and MSN will follow, serves to underscore the vision that Amazon had/has and the lack thereof by RIAA. In a related article here and post Amazon's "One Click" purchasing is a really easy and slick way to buy from Amazon. I "One Clicked" over 200 Madonna titles.. Easy and fun....I am a Material Boy! (ah er..Man!) LOL!

(thealexweb said @ #4)
Could you burn them to a disk, then get your refund?

That'd be illegal I'd guess, as you are giving up the right to listen to that track. But I would imagine anyone willing to do that probably wouldn't have purchased the track in the first place

(TCLN Ryster said @ #4.2)

That'd be illegal I'd guess, as you are giving up the right to listen to that track. But I would imagine anyone willing to do that probably wouldn't have purchased the track in the first place :)

Good point, oh well I don't have any Yahoo music tracks.

Thats pretty cool that they are either going give them a refund, or give the option to give the song DRM free. Seems like more and more places are going DRM free which is nice.