Yes, Windows Server 2012 R2 will also get a "Spring Update"

Microsoft confirmed on Sunday that Windows 8.1 will be getting a "Spring Update" in the near future that will include some UI changes made for mouse and keyboard users, among other features and improvements. However, the company also quietly revealed that Windows Server 2012 R2 will also be getting its own "Spring Update".

The official Windows Server blog confirmed those plans, but concrete details on the update's contents have yet to be revealed. Microsoft did state, "This update to Windows Server 2012 R2 includes minor UI enhancements and bug fixes, as well as previously-released monthly update rollups and security fixes." As with the Windows 8.1 announcement, the blog did not give a specific release date for the update, saying only that more information will be shared before the download will be made available.

One thing the blog did touch upon was its compatibility with other programs. It stated that the Windows Server team is "committed" to making the update process "as simple and straightforward as possible, ensuring that Microsoft and non-Microsoft applications running on Windows Server 2012 R2 'just work' without the need for re-certification." Windows Server 2012 R2 was first released in October, alongside Windows 8.1

Source: Microsoft | Image via Microsoft

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Ian William said,
Hopefully they call it Windows Server 2012 R3 or something of that effect.

*boggle* Changing its retail designation makes absolutly no sense for a minor update. R3 would indicate significant feature changes, and that you probably don't want servers auto-updating to it.

Well no #### sherlock, this was pretty well a no brainer since client and server have been code synced since Server 2008. How is this news exactly?

Chris123NT said,
Well no #### sherlock, this was pretty well a no brainer since client and server have been code synced since Server 2008. How is this news exactly?

Could not agree more, they share same kernel and build number... So you don't have to worry about it... The client and the server is the same OS with the server just having the tools and applications that a server should have.

Chris123NT said,
Well no #### sherlock, this was pretty well a no brainer since client and server have been code synced since Server 2008. How is this news exactly?

It's news because like you said:
Windows Server 2012 ~= Windows 8
Windows Server 2012 R2 ~= Windows 8.1

However, upgrading Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 is free, whereas Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 is not and requires separate licensing.

This clarifies that the spring update will not be the same type of upgrade as 2012 to 2012 R2 and will instead be a free rollup-type update.

Chris123NT said,
Well no #### sherlock, this was pretty well a no brainer since client and server have been code synced since Server 2008. How is this news exactly?

Actually they have been the same code and binaries since 1993. It was only Windows XP and Server 2003 that the two versions differed. XP SP2 and the security reorganization brought them back into parity for both x86 and x64 versions.

Since server became x64 only, it is the x64 desktop version that remains in parity, both source code and binaries.

Fred 69 said,

It's news because like you said:
Windows Server 2012 ~= Windows 8
Windows Server 2012 R2 ~= Windows 8.1

However, upgrading Windows 8 to Windows 8.1 is free, whereas Windows Server 2012 and Windows Server 2012 R2 is not and requires separate licensing.

This clarifies that the spring update will not be the same type of upgrade as 2012 to 2012 R2 and will instead be a free rollup-type update.

99.99% of enterprise Windows Server users have licensing so that they don't pay for each update.

That number is probably more like 80%. There are a lot of small businesses that don't have a licensing contract with Microsoft. They usually use the Server Essentials version and it was a big annoyance to buy another whole new license just to get the latest bug fixes a few months later. Microsoft could have at least offered a cheaper upgrade for users of the Essentials version. I certainly hope that this time around it will be free.

Gungel said,
That number is probably more like 80%. There are a lot of small businesses that don't have a licensing contract with Microsoft. They usually use the Server Essentials version and it was a big annoyance to buy another whole new license just to get the latest bug fixes a few months later. Microsoft could have at least offered a cheaper upgrade for users of the Essentials version. I certainly hope that this time around it will be free.

That is why I said 'enterprise'; however, I do agree that Microsoft should be a bit more flexible. They are trying to get people/small business to move over to a licensing plan, which does end up being cheaper even for small business installations. Their problem is the licensing complexity, as they still use partners and representatives instead of providing a clear pricing model that can be purchased easier. This has left a lot of small IT consultants out of the loop or unaware of how well the licensing plans work.

Off topic: Something odd about Neowin, why everytime I open an article on neowin a music o commercial plays? and there's no video or AD playing. For example, right now there is a german rap music playing O.o, it only happens here on Neowin

I have a question regarding Windows 8....

So now that this will be available thru WU....

What happens if you are on Windows 8 and not 8.1 and you try to update? This "Spring Update" will install 8.1 AND then the update along with it?
Or its possible to jump right from 8->spring update without any issues?

Probably not. Because the spring update is an update for Windows 8.1, you'll have to install 8.1 to be able to detect and then install the spring update.

However, this article is not about Windows 8[.1].

este said,
Yea I know, a little off topic. Thanks for the response, i'll have to wait and see how this all plays out

Since this is a relatively small update to 8.1, which is free to all 8.0 users, I suspect they're not going to invest the resources testing the migration path from 8.0 directly to 8.1.1.

Why the concern? If you're on 8, why haven't you made the move to 8.1 already?

_dandy_ said,

Since this is a relatively small update to 8.1, which is free to all 8.0 users, I suspect they're not going to invest the resources testing the migration path from 8.0 directly to 8.1.1.

Why the concern? If you're on 8, why haven't you made the move to 8.1 already?

Not logged in with a Microsoft account.

este said,
Not logged in with a Microsoft account.

??

I had 8.0 machines that were never associated with any MS account, and they're now all on 8.1.

Hopefully they pull all the "touch centric" AKA Metro crap out of the OS. Even if you are a Metro fan, it has NO BUSINESS in a server OS.

runningnak3d said,
Hopefully they pull all the "touch centric" AKA Metro crap out of the OS. Even if you are a Metro fan, it has NO BUSINESS in a server OS.

I keep seeing this argument. I use 8.1 and Server 2012 R2 quite a bit, and frankly in my day-to-day work, I hardly ever see anything Metro. Even the start screen, for that matter, given the shortcuts and pinned icon functionality that's still there.

_dandy_ said,

I keep seeing this argument. I use 8.1 and Server 2012 R2 quite a bit, and frankly in my day-to-day work, I hardly ever see anything Metro. Even the start screen, for that matter, given the shortcuts and pinned icon functionality that's still there.

I don't care if YOU don't see it, or for that matter if *I* don't see it, it has NO EFFING business in a server OS. Bloatware.....

runningnak3d said,
I don't care if YOU don't see it, or for that matter if *I* don't see it, it has NO EFFING business in a server OS. Bloatware.....

Dude. Chill. Seriously.


Try Server 2012 Core then. You won't see a damned thing.

_dandy_ said,

Dude. Chill. Seriously.


Try Server 2012 Core then. You won't see a damned thing.

Dude. No. Seriously.

When server core is appropriate, it gets deployed.

runningnak3d said,
Dude. No. Seriously.

When server core is appropriate, it gets deployed.

Out of curiosity, how do you measure 2012's Metro "bloat" anyway? I hope it's not disk space.

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