Your next Linux desktop could be an Android Phone

Here at Neowin, we love operating systems and gadgets, so how cool would it be getting the full Ubuntu OS running on your device? The answer is: very cool. Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu understands this and has decided to work on a full desktop version of Ubuntu which works with multi-core Android devices.

Imagine carrying a full desktop computer in your pocket. We’re not talking about tablet OS’s we’re talking about a better standard system which meets the needs and requirements of all users.

Ubuntu for Android is something that is already available unofficially but lacks functionality and is something we've only dreamed about up to this point.

It makes sense that Canonical would start developing this seeing as the Android kernel is based on the Linux kernel which is fully compatible with Ubuntu. This means that the core system should work. On top of the standard Ubuntu OS, users will be able to access all of their phone's goodies, including SMS messages and phone calls.

Linux-based systems aren’t hardware demanding. In fact, most multi-core phones with at least 512MB of RAM should be able to handle the Ubuntu build for Android.

This does not rid users of Android, nor does it ruin the way either operating system works. Ubuntu for Android works side-by-side and interlaces with certain Android features to deliver a more practical desktop experience without losing the perks of a user's beloved Android device.

At this point, Canonical is still calling out to developers, manufacturers and carries to help support Ubuntu’s integration with Android, so it's hard to say when we'll actually see this in the consumer market. Canonical is, however, planning to demo Ubuntu for Android at next week's Mobile World Congress convention in Barcelona, so we’ll definitely learn more then.

For more information on Ubuntu for Android, go here. Feel free to let Canonical know any ideas that you may have, features are up for discussion.

Let us know your thoughts.

Revision: Based on comments I've elaborated on certain aspects of how Ubuntu for Android works.

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So Motorola did all this work on Webtop only to find out that it will be replaced by Ubuntu!


And I think Google is doing something like this too. For all the Android phones. They did buy Motorola. Probably for Android 5.0 Jelly bean.

FMH said,
So Motorola did all this work on Webtop only to find out that it will be replaced by Ubuntu!


And I think Google is doing something like this too. For all the Android phones. They did buy Motorola. Probably for Android 5.0 Jelly bean.

Webtop is still basically a browser based OS. I don't know what Google will be doing with Android 5.0 in this regard but if they plan using ChromeOS then Ubuntu on Android is still miles ahead of both in functionality.

Agreed. ChromeOS for desktop mode sounds interesting, and probably will become reality, but it's not very functional. A slightly fuller OS seems more attractive.

What on earth is the point?

The transformer already provides a desktop environment and so will Win8. What's the point in introducing yet another environment when Android itself will do?

What on earth is the point?

The transformer already provides a desktop environment and so will Win8. What's the point in introducing yet another environment when Android itself will do?

stevehoot said,
What on earth is the point?

The transformer already provides a desktop environment and so will Win8. What's the point in introducing yet another environment when Android itself will do?

The point?

Linux distributions are far more powerful, faster, and full featured than the crippled Android implementation people are running on phones.

Go look up Dalvik, and you will see why Android is kind of crap in comparison to a traditional Linux desktop distribution.

What on earth is the point?

The transformer already provides a desktop environment and so will Win8. What's the point in introducing yet another environment when Android itself will do?

stevehoot said,
What on earth is the point?

The transformer already provides a desktop environment and so will Win8. What's the point in introducing yet another environment when Android itself will do?

That's like asking what's the point of releasing Windows8 when Apple is releasing Mountain Lion: because Microsoft is not Apple, and they likely consider they can do better and/or introduce their own vision of how computing should be and/or at least make some cash.

Canonical is not Google, tablets are not smartphones and other than stuff like Motorola's Webtop we have yet to see anything like this (and then this is far more complete than Webtop).

I'm sure Microsoft, Apple and Google will eventually also go this way, but unless I've missed some news they have yet to even announce anything that works like that.

Linux-based systems aren't hardware demanding. In fact, most multi-core phones with at least 512MB of RAM should be able to handle the Ubuntu build for Android.

And neither is Windows, so the comparative point is directed at who and means what?
Windows 7 runs well in 512mb of RAM (as well as Ubuntu), and as the ARM ported versions of Windows 8 demonstrated, running full versions of Office 2010 in the demonstrations and Firefox on single core ARM systems, it makes it really hard to argue that Windows is more demanding that Linux loading XWindows and a Window Manager.

Microsoft is literally using WP7 devices for Windows 8 development testing. These are 512mb 1ghz first generation Snapdragon based devices.

As for the article...

There is merit in running a full version of Linux over Android, even though this is not the project's intent. In fact if the right device driver support and native frameworks were added to Linux and a WM, it would be a far better solution than Android.

Android is a 'heavy' small OS. By this, it uses the Linux kernel, but then doesn't use the important parts of the kernel, bypassing the kernel process and memory management for example, as this 'requires' too much of the Linux kernel to 'turn on' and load dependencies. (Sadly a flaw in the design of the Linux kernel).

Android then uses its own upper layer services for App and process management and memory management. Which is where Android becomes a horrible OS, as the way it mangles Apps and memory hasn't been seen since the late 80s in OS technology. Even Windows 3.x was far more advanced in functionality.

Android then has another issue, which is the investment in Dalvik, which is a rather poor JVM for devices, as the APIs and framework it offers are rather limited, and is slow and heavy. App sizes end up large, and the memory use for the OS platform is high even without Apps running.

The Dalivk framework performance is also rather bad, which is why 'immerisive' and 'gitzy' are not things Android developer usually do unless they are willing to write an App that bypasses the JVM framework and is strictly OpenGL. Try do 2D animations on Android let alone 3D effects in the UI of the native framework without using OpenGL. The performance is horribly bad, and this is just not because of the poor/lacking GPU offload support, but that also doesn't help.

So Linux on a phone, a real Linux with XWindows and WM, could have far more potential for performance and functionality than Android. The trick is to get these groups to 'dump' Android altogether and team up to create a single distribution of Linux designed for the Mobile Market.

They could even refine the kernel used to get real-time kernel, and have the seamless response performance like WinCE does on WP7, it would be another win over Android and its Linux kernel implementation. (WinCE is a RT OS if nothing else. NT Win7 Embedded hits close, and NT Win8 should also offer WinCE realtime functionality.)

The Android users would jump at it, as it would be far more than what Android provides now, and the non-Android users would consider it as well if it can offer the stability of Ubuntu instead of the FC nightmare Android offers users.

The fact that a GMail account is not necessary and Google is no longer tracking everything you do would be another bonus to break from Google's questionable privacy rules and ethics.

I would love to see a combined effort to replace Android with a full Linux desktop. Microsoft seems to agree that 'unification' and a desktop OS can run rather well on phones and tablets in today's computing power as well. (Apple started the buzz, but hasn't 'got' this part yet.)

thenetavenger said,

And neither is Windows, so the comparative point is directed at who and means what?
Windows 7 runs well in 512mb of RAM (as well as Ubuntu)

Oh come on. I like Windows 7 too, but that's stretching the truth just a tad. I've found I need at a minimum 2GB of ram for Windows 7 to run smoothly on a day to day basis. By comparison, XP, Ubuntu, and Arch all run quite happily with 512 MB, although in Ubuntu's (Unity's case), I'd argue that 1GB runs more smoothly.

There's nothing wrong with requiring 1 to 2 GB on new machines as most are deploying with that amount anyway. For older machines though, XP and lighter Linux DE's like XFCE and Fluxbox are a staple.


thenetavenger said,

, and as the ARM ported versions of Windows 8 demonstrated, running full versions of Office 2010 in the demonstrations and Firefox on single core ARM systems, it makes it really hard to argue that Windows is more demanding that Linux loading XWindows and a Window Manager.

The problem is when you try and do any serious multitasking, single core's break down very quickly, no matter what OS. That problem is amplified when you have lots of services running in the background as is typical of desktop Windows. For this reason, I doubt we'll see any single core Windows 8 tablets running consumer versions.

thenetavenger said,

Microsoft is literally using WP7 devices for Windows 8 development testing. These are 512mb 1ghz first generation Snapdragon based devices.

Is that kernel testing, or the actual Windows 8 metro UI?

thenetavenger said,
There is merit in running a full version of Linux over Android, even though this is not the project's intent. In fact if the right device driver support and native frameworks were added to Linux and a WM, it would be a far better solution than Android.

I think the idea is to get the best of both worlds.
Syanide posted an excellent video of it in action - http://www.youtube.com/watch?f..._embedded&v=3pZUCKt0RKc

I really think this is the future of computing. It looks amazing.

thenetavenger said,
(Sadly a flaw in the design of the Linux kernel).

I don't see that as a flaw. The Linux kernel has been adapted to fit many environments, that's one of it's, the GPL's. and open source's strengths. We all benefit from additions.

Besides, the Android kernel will likely converge with the mainline in the future anyway. In the meantime, the Linux kernel still benefits from the current explosion of device support being added by companies like Samsung, Intel, and others.

simplezz said,

...

Wow, not even sure this is worth the time...

512mb runs as fast as XP on 1ghz CPUs, and with 1gb of RAM runs faster than XP. There is no real debate here, just benchmark it yourself.

(There are some serious technical reasons this is true, that involve a lot of enhancements from memory priority, to the new video, audio, network stacks in Windows 7. Just offloading stuff to the GPU that the CPU has to do on XP helps a lot more than people realize.)

Single core multi-tasking... "Break down"? Really?

Ok, again, the Win8 ARM developers are using SINGLE CORE WP7 phones for development and testing. 1ghz first generation SnapDragon devices with 512mb of RAM. Do you really think the 'single' core is not feasible?

In kernel architectures there are several specific designs that work better with single CPUs and some that work horribly with single CPUs for multi-tasking. This is where this conversation goes above your pay grade.

Sure multi-tasking on single CPUs is not 'easy', but it comes down to the kernel design of how efficient and 'smooth' this happens. For some kernel designs this is what they were designed to do well, and there is usually 'PLENTY' of idle cycles that can be utilized even when several processes are hitting the CPU hard.

simplezz said,
...

Examples:

NT is one kernel model that is above average at this. It also is exceptional at SMP, which is abnormal, since kernel designs either excel at one or the other and usually not both. The reason NT is good at this is a very complicated conversation that starts from the hardware architecture it is designed around, and how it interfaces with the HAL, and the base kernel API layers, the abstraction above the base NT kernel of the API sets it provides to upper layers that 'host' the OS subsystems.

There are also the SMP revisions in Windows 7 that 'smashes' the overhead barrier of SMP that Linux and other OSes are still fighting with. Windows 7 has less overhead managing threads on 64 CPUs than Linux has managing 8-16 CPUs.

In the Server class, Windows 7 (2008 R2) can handle 256 CPUs without the 'overhead' reducing the advantage of the additional CPUs/Cores. This isn't about how 'many' CPUs the OSes can support, as you can flip switches in both NT and Linux to manage 1000 CPUs. However, there becomes an overhead point that makes adding additional CPUs reduce overall performance as the OS is spending more time 'managing' the CPUs/Cores than using them.

The design model of the Linux kernel is rather good at single CPU multi-tasking, which is why it became as popular as it did, because it could remain competitive to NT where other kernel models could not. Linux is also does fairly well with SMP. The trick with Linux is a 'true' port that goes through and optimizes the source code to the platform. Linux has some 'real' conceptual flaws on both single core and SMP systems. Linux's granularity debates are epic, and there is still not a good answer for serving the 'multiple' roles people want Linux to work with.

Another 'epic' kernel and single core multi-tasking story comes from Apple...

When Apple was gearing up for OS X, they ran into issues on single core multi-tasking. The MACH/BSD interface kernel model that OS X uses that came from NeXT and XNU had horrible performance on Single CPUs for multi-tasking. This is again rather technical, but it is how the processes and threads are handled by the kernel. At the time OS X was being 'molded' into OS X, mutli-CPU/Core (SMP) systems were expensive and rare. In order for OS X to compete with Linux and NT at the time it was released, Apple had to 'work' around the flaws in the kernel model that made it hard to deal with the queues on single CPU systems. This is where they both succeeded somewhat and caused their current 'epic fail' that they still haven't found a way around. Apple restructured the BSD to Mach Queue. This improved Single CPU multi-tasking enough to make OS X be somewhat competitive to Linux and NT at the time.

However, as dual-core and SMP systems got cheap, and became the path for increasing computing power, this locking mechanism fix became a problem, as it restricted the SMP performance, especially when moving past two CPUs/Cores. It was server software developers like from MySQL that noticed this outside of Apple, as they found mutli-CPU Macs were 'choking' on a lot of threads that their database was generating. The OS X kernel was locking to resolve the queue as it would for a single CPU design. However, when this funnel lock would engage, it would shut down processing on the additional CPUs/Cores until it was resolved. Since it would literally require 'rebuilding' the OS X kernel, and breaking the platform as OS X had been on the market a few years, it was a nightmare that could not be fixed, and still is not fixed. Apple's solution was a new set of APIs in Snow Leopard to help 'bypass' the funnel locks.

However, the funny thing is the OS and Applications in the OS can still create hard funnel locks, that even the newer API based threading Applications must wait and suspend use of the additional CPUs/Cores until it is resolved. (Which is why the 4 and 8 CPU/Core Mac Pros are 'funny', as they are literally 'locked' and everything is then running on one or two CPUs the majority of the time.)

And we could go on about 10 other kernel design models; however, the point you seem to not realize is that we have been multi-tasking on single CPU systems for 20 years at the consumer level, with a lot of success in doing so, even on tiny 386 and 486 systems that are a fraction of the processing in a typical smartphone.

And you 'assert' that Windows 8 'needs' multi-core for ARM? Sure they will be faster, but 'need' is a bit strong. If Windows NT 4.0 could handle a lot of threads and traffic from client systems and/or web sites with 32mb of RAM on a 486 class SINGLE cpu, as was VERY common in the 90s, there is NO reason Windows NT today cannot do this a lot more RAM and a much faster class of processor, even if it is an ARM CPU.


As for the Linux 'adapting', sure it has been 'adapted', but it is NOT optimized for the majority of the systems it runs on. For 'true' optimization, the HALs need to be ripped out, and the kernel and the drivers need to be coded for the architecture and compiled for the 'specific' machine hardware. Which means even changing the video card requires a recompile of the kernel. (This fails to work at the end user level, and it also is something device makers do not take the time, as recoding a lot of Linux source code to get the optimal performance is a LOT of work. It also means that even minor hardware changes or updates to 'pieces' that touch the kernel, require everything to be compiled together again, which cannot work for 'deployed' devices or systems that will use additional hardware or need updates. This is why it uses generic 'compatibility drivers' and tricks, that are NOT optimized for the hardware.

Unless you have compiled the drivers and Linux kernel together specifically for your system, it is not optimized, even if it is optimized for the x86 or x64 platform.

In case you really are 'new' to Linux, Bing/Google compile Linux kernel, and you will find 1000s of guides on how to properly compile the kernel for your system instead of using the generic HALs. And I would bet good money even if you know this, you probably have not taken the time or trouble to do this.

NT does NOT need to 'recompiled' for driver changes or hardware changes due to the dynamic nature of how the kernel works, and the portable model it uses that works to a specific architecture with the inter-dependencies.

Taking this even further, NT doesn't even have to have 'code' changed' when porting to a new architecture, as the recompile for the architecture will optimized the NT kernel and code, with the only 'coding' that is truly necessary is in the hardware abstraction layer that is both adjusting the differences and doing high performance translations. This is a one time optimization process and then 'sticks' to the architecture, and the NT code doesn't care if it is running on a calculator or a supercomputer as long as the architecture meets that 'base requirements' of its 'targeted architecture minimums'.

GET IT?


As for 'support' from Samsung and others, you might want to read what they have been saying about Android the past couple of years. It is the STOP GAP, until Microsoft can get a faster OS model on lower end devices. Android is TOO expensive to build/compile for device and TOO expensive to repeat this process for every update.

simplezz said,
Besides, the Android kernel will likely converge with the mainline in the future anyway. In the meantime, the Linux kernel still benefits from the current explosion of device support being added by companies like Samsung, Intel, and others.
Most of what you said was either an assumption, or wrong.

Windows 8 improves performance and lowers the memory footprint of the overall OS. It has already "met" the same system requirements as Windows 7 (which thenetavenger has gone into), even though it has really (and quite literally) achieved lower system requirements than Windows 7; it's just hard to tell businesses and users that the next OS will perform better than the current one, but please buy the current one for the next eight months. Windows 8 does more with less processes running while using less memory and lower CPU utilization (not necessarily going hand-in-hand with less processes, although it generally helps). With the lower process count combined with low CPU utilization, the CPU scheduler can do more work with weaker hardware than before, meaning even more threads can be spliced together on a single core much better than even recent memory, which really hasn't been that bad even as it continues to improve (after all, I was multitasking before I had an AMD dual core chip in my PC as I ran web browsers and development environments; multitasking has just become cool (rightfully so) with the advent of more cores).

As for the Android kernel converging with Linux. This is floated around regularly by people that love Android and Linux people that want the drivers to come back to Linux, but it has been shown to be completely wrong. At the beginning, there were clear hopes for Android changes sliding down the hill back into Linux. However, Google never committed resources and they never actually merged-back working changes. In fact, the people maintaining the Linux kernel have removed Android from it because of that very reason.

http://www.zdnet.com/news/linu...-kernel-code-removal/389733

Edited by pickypg, Feb 23 2012, 5:03pm :

pickypg said,
As for the Android kernel converging with Linux. This is floated around regularly by people that love Android and Linux people that want the drivers to come back to Linux, but it has been shown to be completely wrong. At the beginning, there were clear hopes for Android changes sliding down the hill back into Linux. However, Google never committed resources and they never actually merged-back working changes. In fact, the people maintaining the Linux kernel have removed Android from it because of that very reason.

http://www.zdnet.com/news/linu...-kernel-code-removal/389733

I don't know how much of it will get in or how much time it could take, but they are already working on mainlining the Android kernel.

The zdnet link is two years old and there have been some things going on since then:

http://www.phoronix.com/scan.p...ge=news_item&px=MTAzMTY
https://plus.google.com/111049...159033135/posts/5WfyJ1GAFXM

The G+ is from Greg Kroah-Hartman, the same kernel dev that was quoted in the zdnet article.

Edited by ichi, Feb 23 2012, 6:29pm :

ichi said,
I don't know how much of it will get in or how much time it could take, but they are already working on mainlining the Android kernel.

The zdnet link is two years old and there have been some things going on since then:

http://www.phoronix.com/scan.p...ge=news_item&px=MTAzMTY

(Can't read the G+ one)

At this point, it is going to take many months, and likely years to mainline the Android kernel back with the Linux kernel because Google has frankly taken too long. It could happen with some dedicated resources, but both kernels are moving targets (heck, the mainline Linux kernel is up to 3.2.x now while Android runs from 2.6.x; even ignoring the fact that the "leap" from 2.x to 3.0 was nothing particularly major, it is a worthwhile mention) and it appears that Google has very little interest to do so right now. I am actually a bit surprised by that because it seems like it would be in Google's favor to merge them back to sweep in future modifications for both Android and Chrome OS as they begin to merge themselves.

Somewhat amusingly, one the major features that people want from Android are their "Wakelocks." It has been implemented separately:

http://lwn.net/Articles/416690/

Somewhat confusingly, they still want to mainline the Android implementation back into the Linux kernel, even though the above solution is superior:

http://elinux.org/Android_Mainlining_Project#Progress_Chart

pickypg said,
At this point, it is going to take many months, and likely years to mainline the Android kernel back with the Linux kernel because Google has frankly taken too long.

Probably. The major part seems to be done, but that doesn't say much about how long the remaining bits will take.

This is the G+ post anyway:

Lots of stable and longterm Linux kernel rc1 releases now out there, please go test.

For some not-so-stable stuff, the next linux-next Linux kernel release should almost boot an Android userspace, we are only missing one piece, ashmem, and that should hopefully land in my staging-next tree next week. The patches are still being tested and cleaned up by others.

Note, this does not include the wakelock code, that is being worked on by others, and isn't necessary for Android to boot, just needed so it doesn't drain your battery.

So hopefully, by the 3.3 kernel release, the majority of the Android code will be merged, but more work is still left to do to better integrate the kernel and userspace portions in ways that are more palatable to the rest of the kernel community. That will take longer, but I don't foresee any major issues involved.

How awesome would it be to have any phone dock to become its parent OS?

Future iPhone docks using Thunderbolt to give the user Mac OS X.
Future Windows Phone docks and gives the current version of Windows.

They would be much slower than dedicated PCs, similar to laptops being slower, but just imagine the possibilities with small mobile use getting one view while docked usage providing the more useful desktop versions. That's a future that is probably not too far given the sharing of kernels between Windows Phone and Windows (talk about a trump card if they could do that). Then I might consider a 64 GB phone rather than my standard lowest-capacity-works mentality.

I like Android, but must say having Android on the phone and Ubuntu on the monitor screen when connecting phone via usb(or other cable?) to the screen would be quite cool

SHADOW-XIII said,
I like Android, but must say having Android on the phone and Ubuntu on the monitor screen when connecting phone via usb(or other cable?) to the screen would be quite cool

Seconded. It's like a hybrid device that has the best of both worlds.

The ONLY good I see out of this is Ubunutu developers writing drivers for the Android kernel.......

Although I believe this is a bit more geared towards "Wubi" (it would be "Aubi") for Android. correct?

YouWhat said,
Nothing new with this, I ran the full ubuntu OS on my Nokia n900 over 18months ago!

This is not the full Ubuntu OS running on a smartphone, it's Android and Ubuntu running on parallel and automatically switching to the Ubuntu desktop when connecting the phone to the TV, with full access to the Android data, apps and phone functionality.

I mean, it's not an uber-awesome-never-ever-seen-or-thought-before innovation, but it's not old by any means, either.

Don't think it'll really catch on until you can buy a Linux phone off the shelf, and then it'll only have a (relatively) small target audience.
Cool idea though :-)

S_Herbie said,
Don't think it'll really catch on until you can buy a Linux phone off the shelf, and then it'll only have a (relatively) small target audience.
Cool idea though :-)

Have you even bothered reading the article? It comes as an additional side-by-side layer to Android with which it shares the kernel and user data. Android, as in you know, currently the best selling smartphone OS on the planet.

Syanide said,

Have you even bothered reading the article? It comes as an additional side-by-side layer to Android with which it shares the kernel and user data. Android, as in you know, currently the best selling smartphone OS on the planet.

To be fair, the article does a very poor job at explaining what this is really about.

Edited by ichi, Feb 22 2012, 9:32pm :

ichi said,

To be fair, the article does a very poor job at explaining what this is really about.

"Ubuntu for Android" throughout the article kind of implies that it's side-by-side, rather than one entirely new OS. Sorry for the confusion .

Zeikku said,
"Ubuntu for Android" throughout the article kind of implies that it's side-by-side, rather than one entirely new OS. Sorry for the confusion .

Yep, kinda. I didn't find it confusing, but then I had already read about it. Reading some of the comments here and then going back to re-read the article I understand why some people didn't get it.

ichi said,

Yep, kinda. I didn't find it confusing, but then I had already read about it. Reading some of the comments here and then going back to re-read the article I understand why some people didn't get it.

Might re-write a paragraph a bit later, re-outlining exactly how it works.

Syanide said,

Have you even bothered reading the article? It comes as an additional side-by-side layer to Android with which it shares the kernel and user data. Android, as in you know, currently the best selling smartphone OS on the planet.

The success of Android is irrelevant in this case. His point still stands that probably only a few would actually want to turn their phone into a desktop PC. Especially using Ubuntu.

Syanide said,

Have you even bothered reading the article? It comes as an additional side-by-side layer to Android with which it shares the kernel and user data. Android, as in you know, currently the best selling smartphone OS on the planet.

Yes, I did read it and yes, I did understand it. My point was that it will have a very small audience and until it comes as an off the shelf feature (i.e. you buy the phone and this is already installed - along with Android - it won't really take off.
Incidentally, I am an Android user (and constantly bore my colleagues and friends with the best features and advantages over other platforms).

I_Kaplan said,
That would be awesome!

I guess with the quad core phones starting i say why not! looking forward to seeing how this will go down and if it does!

As cool as is sound and me being an Ubuntu user, I think that this will increase the fragmentation issue which already plague the android phone market, nevertheless is in deed nice to have this option since both Apple and MS are taking that path with iOS/OSX and windows phones/Win8...it was about time that Canonical did it.

Meconio said,
As cool as is sound and me being an Ubuntu user, I think that this will increase the fragmentation issue which already plague the android phone market, nevertheless is in deed nice to have this option since both Apple and MS are taking that path with iOS/OSX and windows phones/Win8...it was about time that Canonical did it.

Fragmentation? I'm not sure I follow. This isn't another version of Android. This is an entirely separate "app" that runs on top of Android. This has nothing to do with fragmentation and everything to do with fantastic innovations as a product of environment Android has created.

Meconio said,
nevertheless is in deed nice to have this option since both Apple and MS are taking that path with iOS/OSX and windows phones/Win8

If think I must have missed the news about Apple or MS announcing something like this.

ichi said,
If think I must have missed the news about Apple or MS announcing something like this.

I think he's referring to how Microsoft are moving towards "one operating system for all devices" with Windows 8, and how Apple are merging aspects of iOS in to OS X. Canonical are doing the same kind of move by providing an operating system that will run on your phone and your computer.

satukoro said,
2012 is the year of the Linux phone! Microsoft and Apple's ecosystems will fade away any moment!

))

satukoro said,
2012 is the year of the Linux phone! Microsoft and Apple's ecosystems will fade away any moment!

Just like 2001 was going to be the year of the Linux desktop, overtaking Microsoft?

S_Herbie said,

Just like 2001 was going to be the year of the Linux desktop, overtaking Microsoft?

Whaaaat ? So this didn't happen ? How could they lie so many people through all those years ?

mantragora said,

Whaaaat ? So this didn't happen ? How could they lie so many people through all those years ?

They were lying? But they told me Linux was so much more advanced!

satukoro said,
2012 is the year of the Linux phone! Microsoft and Apple's ecosystems will fade away any moment!

Haha...in your dream...linux is trying for 20 years. Nothing happened and nothing will be.

tuneslover said,

Haha...in your dream...linux is trying for 20 years. Nothing happened and nothing will be.

It seems my blatant mockery has been misinterpreted...