Americans: unhappy with their ISPs, but love Apple and Samsung smartphones

You don’t have to dig through pages and pages of Google to find users that aren’t happy with their ISPs globally. When it boils down to it, no one will ever be truly happy with the service they receive. Well now the American Consumer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) has found that US consumers are becoming increasingly unhappy with their internet service providers (ISP).

The most significant change is Time Warner Cable dropping 9% to 54 overall satisfaction rating in 2014, from 2013’s almost dizzying 63. Verizon Communications (FiOS) has been lucky, both topping the table with 71 and not dropping any percentage points. The only ISP to gain points was third placed CenturyLink, who gained 1% to take their overall score to 65.

While a good score is always going to be subjective – you might have no problems with your ISP’s service, but your John Doe friend might be fighting a constant battle with tech support – American consumer satisfaction with ISPs is lower than any other industry tracked by the ACSI. Dan VanAmburg, MD for the ACSI has said:

The score is both absolute and relative. It’s absolute in that we could say any score in the 50′s or low 60′s is a pretty dissatisfying experience, and any score in the 80′s or low 90′s is pretty outstanding. But there’s relativity as well. Is a 79 a really good score? Sure, if you’re an airline. However, if you’re an automaker, a 79 is actually at the bottom of the barrel. So what’s most important is to look at the variation in positioning within an industry.

In addition to ISP satisfaction scores, the numbers for Smartphone Customer Satisfaction have been shown off. And guess who gets to gloat: Samsung. They take five of the top 10 spots, with the Galaxy Note II leading the charge at number one with an 85 overall satisfaction rating. The other five spots: all Apple. Most notably though, the (reported) flop that is the iPhone 5C in number two with 84 overall, beating out the iPhone 5S on 83. Unfortunately for Microsoft, Lumias didn't make the top ten.

Source: Digital Trends | Images courtesy of ACSI

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23 Comments

Commenting is disabled on this article.

I can't find the report an issue link, so as others have pointed out, the math in that table for %change is correct. You should update this article, because it is not only factually incorrect, it also makes you look stupid.

Report issue is now in the poster's dropdown menu. Point at "Andrew Stevenson" just under the headline. I did send him something but I was a bit grumpy at the time so I didn't explain much >_>

Thank you for the math corrections. I was about to post a comment, but was beaten to it!

Isn't there some corollary on the Internet that when people criticize others in forums, they are very likely to be guilty of doing the same thing? Like when people call out others for grammer/spelling errors, and there wrong themselves?

;)

Moving to the US in the summer. Going to be there for a year myself. Seems to be tricky to find ISPs that actually offer service. Is it really fragmented or something? Does one company get a monopoly in an area? Maybe I'm just not looking right. 60201 is the ZIP code if anyone knows a place where I can actually check to see all the options.

PhilTheThrill said,
Moving to the US in the summer. Going to be there for a year myself. Seems to be tricky to find ISPs that actually offer service. Is it really fragmented or something? Does one company get a monopoly in an area? Maybe I'm just not looking right. 60201 is the ZIP code if anyone knows a place where I can actually check to see all the options.

Yes, usually one company holds a monopoly in an area. It looks like it's Comcast in your area: http://internetprovidersbyzip.com/zipcode/60201

The numbers aren't exactly wrong, but they're calculated stupidly. It looks like they calculate the drop in percentage compared to the average percentage of that year. For example Time Warner: (63-54)/0.63=14%

They probably do this to "dramatize" that percent change.

the author of this article has no idea how to do math himself and shouldn't criticize others.

63 minus 14 PERCENT is 54

So I hate to bugger your ASCI cant do math graphic, but those numbers are representing the %difference between them, not the absolute difference between them, so by going from 63 to 54 TWC lost 14% of their previous years score, not 13% absolutely.

Sorry!

ROFL, the customers are more happy with the Galaxy Note II than the customers are happy with their iPhone 5C and 5S. Says enough really.

Not only that, but this is from the USA to, lol.

Yes, that what the title of the OP says and what the article is about. So yea, It is from the USA. now, if you were making a snide remark about USA, then...whatever.

frett said,

So what's your point about it being in the USA?

Isn't USA the happy land of Apple customers?

Isn't USA the country where the users are more happy with Apple products over other products?

I did guess that, but this article did prove me wrong about that. When a dirty old Galaxy Note II makes the users more happy with that phone over an iPhone 5S, even in the home country to Apple, it says enough, really.

This was my point.

Not much of a point though, is it? One could draw any number of conclusions here, including but not limited to "Hey, I guess no one likes Windows Phone very much!" But that's just statistics for you, best taken with a grain of salt.

It doesn't have to be from the US to be successful either. See Sony's PS4 for example.

Exynos said,

Isn't USA the happy land of Apple customers?

Isn't USA the country where the users are more happy with Apple products over other products?

I did guess that, but this article did prove me wrong about that. When a dirty old Galaxy Note II makes the users more happy with that phone over an iPhone 5S, even in the home country to Apple, it says enough, really.

This was my point.

Again the values are statistically tied to each other. I would wager a guess that the sample sizes are different per phone.

Personally I find this line of logic as flawed as say mocking American Big Three carmakers for lagging behind sales of Japanese cars in a metropolis. Probably a bad analogy but eh.

When I used to live in a big town while at University we had choices in who we used for ISP and Wide Open West was amazing. However, since then I have moved to a small town and only have one option for Internet with Time Warner Cable. Their service and support are rather horrible indeed but you deal with the only options you have.