Auslogics Disk Defrag 3.6

Auslogics Disk Defrag is a compact and fast defragmentation tool that supports both FAT 16/32, and NTFS file systems. It's supplied with advanced disk optimization techniques, which will remedy your system sluggishness and crashes caused by disk fragmentation.

Disk fragmentation leads to system slowdowns, PC crashes, slow startups and shutdowns. Auslogics Disk Defrag is designed for fast defragmentation of modern hard disks.

Features:

  • Defrag and optimize
  • Free space consolidation
  • System files smart placement
  • Keeping the MFT reserved zone clear
  • Single file or folder defragmentation
  • List of fragmented files
  • Auto-defrag mode
  • Scheduled defragmentation
  • Customizing disk defrag
  • Multiple languages

What's new in this version:

  • corrected all known bugs
  • corrected errors in language files

Download: Auslogics Disk Defrag 3.6 | 7.5 MB (Freeware)
Download: Portable Auslogics Disk Defrag 3.6 | 2.8 MB
View: Features & Screenshots | Auslogics Disk Defrag Website

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Defragers are old school=useless beyond Vista/7/8 IMO. XP and before needs 3rd party apps. Defragging SSD's will only shorten the lifespan.

soldier1st said,
Defragers are old school=useless beyond Vista/7/8 IMO. XP and before needs 3rd party apps. Defragging SSD's will only shorten the lifespan.

No it wont. Win7/8 are optimized for SSD's (Vista allot less). And unless the SSD is total crap and does not support TRIM. But if that is the case, defragmentation will automatically be disabled.
But it will happily create fragmented files and defragment on idle time the same as a mechanical harddrive. SSD's are perfectly capable of thiswithout an increase on the wear and tear.

With Windows Vista/7 and especially 8 you can avoid using third-party defragmenters because of the issues with the windows file protection that very few defragmenters support, because Vista/7/8 have a better NTFS file placement algorithm that avoids fragmentation and because the windows tool does a very good job at sorting the files based on access (shortening the boot time) while not every other defragmenter is that good. If you still want to use a third party defragmenter the best is MyDefrag with the System Disk Monthly option even though it takes a lot of time since it moves everything. If you have an SSD Windows 8 defragmenter also works as a TRIM tool so on those drives it's better to use exclusively that.

If your drive is heavily fragmented, contains large fragmented files and is low on space the default Windows one isn't much use. It will just say everything is fine, no defrag needed. Then you run something like this or PerfectDisk, see the true state of the disk and spend hours defragging it back into shape.

protocol7 said,
If your drive is heavily fragmented, contains large fragmented files and is low on space the default Windows one isn't much use. It will just say everything is fine, no defrag needed. Then you run something like this or PerfectDisk, see the true state of the disk and spend hours defragging it back into shape.

The windows defrag (like some others) refuses to defragment when the free space is low because that means it will have to do far more data movements to sort all the files, taking far more time and putting far more stress on the disk (even though I doubt any disk ever died due to defragmentation).

There are several switches if you call the windows defrag manually some of which hidden: there's /X that consolidates free space, /F that forces the defragmenter to start even on low space or with low fragmentation and /W to force defragmentation even on large files. If you use the Windows File Protection/System Restore (enabled by default on every Windows install) and use defragmenters that do not directly support the feature they will inflate the reserved space area used for the backups forcing windows to delete the older backups to free space. PerfectDisk has an option in the settings to support WPF but if you'll enable that you'll see it will act just as conservatively as Windows Defrag (hence the reason why that option is disabled by default).

If you don't use WFP/System Restore then any defragmenter would do, my MyDefrag example was just because it was one of the top performers on The Big XP Defragmenter Test ( http://hofmannc.de/defragxp/index_en.html ) and because it's scriptable so you can tell it to sort the files in any order you want so when used properly it can improve a lot the speed and quality of the defragmentation.

protocol7 said,
If your drive is heavily fragmented, contains large fragmented files and is low on space the default Windows one isn't much use. It will just say everything is fine, no defrag needed. Then you run something like this or PerfectDisk, see the true state of the disk and spend hours defragging it back into shape.

If your windows ends up that heavily defragmentated, especially since vista/7. Then you're clearly doing something wrong yourself.
Windows defrags the disk based on the OS's performance and frequently used programs but also files. It will do this when the system is running with idle resources when required.
It actively monitors the disk for you, there is no requirement for 3rd party defragmentation tools. Fragmentation levels should usually not go beyond ~20%. And from what I've experienced, usually hovers around the 10% mark.