Google bringing ultra high speed broadband to Kansas City, Kansas

Last year, Google announced that they would be bringing 1Gb per second fiber to the home broadband to one lucky city in the US. After that announcement, they had over 1,100 cities apply for the chance to be the lucky city chosen by Google. Today, on the Official Google Blog, Google announced that Kansas City, Kansas would be the one to get the experimental high speed network. 

Not only will Google be laying down fiber in the city, but it will also be working with local organizations to build applications to make the most of the deployment. They said,

In selecting a city, our goal was to find a location where we could build efficiently, make an impact on the community and develop relationships with local government and community organizations. We’ve found this in Kansas City. We’ll be working closely with local organizations including the Kauffman Foundation, KCNext and the University of Kansas Medical Center to help develop the gigabit applications of the future.

According to Google, their network services will begin starting in 2012, pending approval by the city’s Board of Commissioners. Google is looking forward to see what kind of applications come out of Kansas City having a gigabit network to work with. They believe that with the increased availability of bandwidth we will see innovations in online applications. Kansas City, Kansas is only the first of many to come; According to Google, this city will be a test environment for future deployments.

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People here keep saying KC is a small town. Guys, it's a darn city. Not a town. KC stretches over two states. I live in Kansas and it's not small, we'll the Kansas side is smaller than Missouri side, but it's certainly not a "town"

Boeing 787 said,
It's America, 1Gbps should be standard by now.

Not when there's money that can still be squeezed out of 30+yr old copper. Why invest in the future when the past still makes the telco's/ISPs money? [end dripping sarcasm]

AgentGreen said,

Not when there's money that can still be squeezed out of 30+yr old copper. Why invest in the future when the past still makes the telco's/ISPs money? [end dripping sarcasm]

This. I pay the same for ~1.5Mbps dsl as my dad pays for ~20Mbps broadband. Explain that.

Boeing 787 said,
It's America, 1Gbps should be standard by now.

Not until communications backbones can handle Petabytes and exabytes, should anything in the Gigabytes be standard home connections. Seriously, how much longer do you think the old fiber lines can handle the exponential bandwidth usage? And what good does everyone having a gigabit connection do when even the best SERVERS and HARD DRIVES can't handle near as much data transfer speeds to accommodate such high bandwidth? I mean, modern hard drives can't transfer more than several hundred Megabytes of data at once..... And motherboards are limited to x # of gigabits per second processing speeds. Gigabits of processing power aren't going to cut it anymore if everyone's got a Gigabit connection.

Seriously, we need to back off the insane bandwidth speeds until we can develop the hardware and internet backbones to handle it. We're just not there yet.

Hence my earlier prediction (and warning) that google will own the internet one of these days.... Or at least become so big that most communication between internet users (and even landline) will be passing thru their clutches (and control) soon.

My work's ISP has a presence in Kansas City. Wonder if we'll be directly peered with Google in the near future...

I don't know the layout of Kansas City, nor do I know the inital fibre backbone tie-in to allow Google to offer up this sweet-sounding service. However, it's likely that Google engineers and planners looked for a city or town that offered an easier overbuild situation to allow them to lease circuits, or to build their own infrastructure. The costs would be insane to retrofit a city with this type of service, both from the construction standpoint, as well as the network adjustments needed.

Here's hoping the pilot works well, sees a decent return on the investment, and starts spreading to other centres.

Only one more year till I graduate college. LF> Job in Kansas City
Plus, it's not that far of a drive from Stillwater, OK to Kansas City

Good for Kansas... so cold there most of the time, people don't want to leave their houses lol. Hurry up Google and roll this out nation wide!!!

shakey said,
Good for Kansas... so cold there most of the time, people don't want to leave their houses lol. Hurry up Google and roll this out nation wide!!!

WHAT? Yes it's cold in winter, but we get 100 plus F in summer. We are not Canada lol.

There are so many ignorant comments about Kansas in this article. Wow guys. Kansas is nice.


I just hope this pushes ISP's to increase speeds all over the country vs just the Kansas City area. The idea of Caps and constant rising prices on speeds we pay for that we had 5years ago today is just insane and needs to change. There should be no Bandwidth Caps on your internet usage and the average broadband speeds of over 20Mbps Up and Down stream should be available to even those in Rural/Mountain locations.

"Google has said it's not interested in dominating or even grabbing a sizable chunk of the broadband market. Instead, it is dipping into its $35 billion bank account to build an ultra-fast Internet network in hopes of prodding telecommunications and cable providers to upgrade their services in communities across the country."

Conjor said,
Totally moving to Kansas City in 2 years...
LOL! as much as I would love to have these speeds over my horrible ool connection.. I doubt I would ever move out there.

este said,
LOL! as much as I would love to have these speeds over my horrible ool connection.. I doubt I would ever move out there.

Dude, your 2nd ignorant comment. You judge my state like you've lived here. Come on man.


I don't mean to be immature or anything but that's that kind of stuff you might want to hide before you get filmed with an HD camera. Just like on an actor's twitter page who will go unnamed apologized for an ingrown hair he had noticed after an episode aired on TV. Of course, people are people. I can forgive people for having ingrown hairs in HD on TV but damn. They should of applied After Effects or something. Oh well, retarded rant over.

On the other hand, it's great for Google to do this, I mean, really. There's finally a company pushing everyone into the 21st century by force. Unfortunately I'm in Canada, and will never see Gigabit ethernet speed. (f*** you RoBelUs.)

yeah this is now, until someone at AT&T, Verizon, TWC, or Comcast starts a legal battle to stop it claiming its a "community fiber project".... or something of that nature even though its a corporation building it

Jombi said,
@2:00, YELLLLLLLLLLLOW teeth

hahahaha!! I was thinking the exact same thing.
instead of asking if it will send smells thru the fiber, she should be asking if it will send her some tooth past/teeth whitener

I wonder if it will just be the inner city or the surrounding suburbs?

I have a friend in the suburbs of KC, KS and with AT&T's incoming caps and him running webcams around his yard, he could sure use this.

Inklin said,
I wonder if it will just be the inner city or the surrounding suburbs?

I have a friend in the suburbs of KC, KS and with AT&T's incoming caps and him running webcams around his yard, he could sure use this.

My guess is that it will not be the suburbs-- especially the affluent areas like Lenexa and Overland Park. After reading several of the proposals, this program seems to be geared toward the politically heart-warming idea of giving people in less affluent areas new opportunity. I don't really follow that logic, though. I would think more would come of this by sending it to areas of the greatest educated population.

Skwerl said,

My guess is that it will not be the suburbs-- especially the affluent areas like Lenexa and Overland Park. After reading several of the proposals, this program seems to be geared toward the politically heart-warming idea of giving people in less affluent areas new opportunity. I don't really follow that logic, though. I would think more would come of this by sending it to areas of the greatest educated population.

Some schools could really use this. The school I work at is too far out of town to get a "real" connection. We have 2 T1s now, but everything is moving to web-based. Hard to find the bandwidth.

Skwerl said,

My guess is that it will not be the suburbs-- especially the affluent areas like Lenexa and Overland Park. After reading several of the proposals, this program seems to be geared toward the politically heart-warming idea of giving people in less affluent areas new opportunity. I don't really follow that logic, though. I would think more would come of this by sending it to areas of the greatest educated population.

Lenexa and Overland Park are not suburbs of Kansas City, KS. They're not even in the same County.

este said,
Seems like a somewhat boring city for such a cool project, no? (no pun intended)

Well, that's an ignorant comment. There's nothing boring about it. I used to live there and really enjoyed it.
And where the heck is the pun in that comment???

Skwerl said,

Well, that's an ignorant comment. There's nothing boring about it. I used to live there and really enjoyed it.
And where the heck is the pun in that comment???
I think what este means to say is its not a world renowned city like washington dc or new york. I agree it was ignorant.

Skwerl said,

Well, that's an ignorant comment. There's nothing boring about it. I used to live there and really enjoyed it.
And where the heck is the pun in that comment???
I think what este means to say is its not a world renowned city like washington dc or new york. I agree it was ignorant.

este said,
Seems like a somewhat boring city for such a cool project, no? (no pun intended)

No pun detected.

I'm glad google went against the norm. Maybe it's better PR, covering a smaller town, than a tiny part of a city.

este said,
Seems like a somewhat boring city for such a cool project, no? (no pun intended)

Think how unrealistic it would be to have NYC as your test zone. So many apartments and people, it would be hard to keep track of the data they need to collect for their testing purposes.

Skwerl said,

Well, that's an ignorant comment. There's nothing boring about it. I used to live there and really enjoyed it.
And where the heck is the pun in that comment???

Hes probably just put "no pun intended" in to make you think harder about what he said lol

smartin0115 said,

Think how unrealistic it would be to have NYC as your test zone. So many apartments and people, it would be hard to keep track of the data they need to collect for their testing purposes.

+1 to that. After reading that KC would seem like an appropriate city for this to happen in.

De.Bug said,

Hes probably just put "no pun intended" in to make you think harder about what he said lol

It worked, I definitely re-read it

este said,
Seems like a somewhat boring city for such a cool project, no? (no pun intended)

Agreed, I've lived there and have done business there. Not a place you want to live.

KCK has a history of giving significant incentives to draw businesses. I am not saying they did so in this case. Check the history of the building of the NASCAR track in KCK. Tax abatements, free utilities from the board of public utilities to the NASCAR track. The board owns the water and electric companies for the county.

KCK has very high taxes per capita, and some of the lowest incomes in the state. Wyandotte county the home of Kansas City Kansas demographics:
http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/20/20209.html

Note the low median home prices vs the rest of the state. The loss of -1.8% of the population for the county and growth of 4.8% for the rest of the state of KS during the same ten year period.

This project may spill into the surrounding communities, Lenexa, Overland Park, Mission, Shawnee, or perhaps Kansas City Missouri, but I expect they chose Wyandotte county because KCK is giving abatments/utilities to google.

Alberto_R2 said,
I wish we had those speeds over here, stuck with 1Mbps, damn you Carlos Slim!

i've got 20 mb thanks to carlos slim...

Alberto_R2 said,
I wish we had those speeds over here, stuck with 1Mbps, damn you Carlos Slim!
Hilltowns here aren't going anywhere fast, I'm still stuck with 1.5Mbps (fastest option) when the towns on surrounding me have ~20Mbps broadband. It seems Comcast doesn't want to profit from the ~1000 residents in my town.