HP is working on x86 Windows 8 tablet, rough render exposed

 

Windows 8 news comes from a variety of sources. Sometimes it comes from the Windows 8 fountain and other times it comes from sources familiar with company’s plans.

This time around we have some information from a trusted source about HPs upcoming plans for an x86 tablet that will be thinner than the iPad and have 8-10hrs of battery life with a 10.1in screen. What we are showing above is a rendering of the device that is currently going by the name HP Slate 8.

The device is targeted for businesses and as such, will not be using ARM based architecture. At this time, a release date was not given.

We know that the slide above is a bit rough around the edges but our source is adamant that this is a working spec list and the render above is an early mockup for the tablet.

We highly expect that many tablets will be hitting the market around, or not long after Windows 8 is released and HP will surely aiming to be a front-runner in this market.

To build on this further, back in February, CEO Meg Whitman said that it expects that the company will release its first x86 processor-based PCs with Windows 8 installed sometime before the end of 2012. The image you see above is likely a render of that device.

If HP can live up to the spec list above, the device will be compelling alternative to the iPad but one thing is not known and that is the price. If HP can position the tablet competitively, it could have a huge hit on its hands and avoid the TouchPad fiasco. 

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thealexweb said,
It appears to have an usual port at the bottom -.^

Docking connector. It says right in the picture "Enterprise level docking"

MorganX said,
I think HP will deliver. This looks sweet. HP's Engineers went nuts with the Z1 http://www.hp.com/united-state...rkstations/z1_features.html and I don't expect any less here.

Too bad the Z1 doesn't have a mainstream high end DirectX 11 Video and went Open GL. Sure for workstation graphics it's great, and it is a workstation, but a high end Radeon HD or Geforce and I would have one of these babys at home!!

Um, ok couple of things...

1) The GPU is DirectX11 and not all 'workstation graphics' software uses OpenGL, a lot of software uses DirectX11 and or NVidia specific CUDA or CL in addition to DirectX or OpenGL.

2) OpenGL is not 'more advanced' than DirectX, the reason is that OpenGL features 'trail' DirectX, and catch up, often with about 20% lower performance than DirectX.

3) The hardware 'reference' architecture is based on DirectX technologies, as is true of almost all current GPU technology. The shader technology and the newer DMA and I/O technology on modern GPUs are based on the Microsoft Hardware reference design of the XBox 360 GPU. That is where unified shaders that are 'code' agnostic come from, along with the new DMA and I/O features that allow CUDA 2.0 from NVidia to even function.


Even though the 'workstation graphics' cards are not marketed for gaming, they perform very well in gaming, as they are just 'variations' of the traditional consumer grade 'Geforce'.

Here is a good place to use as a basic reference of comparison for 'gaming'. The Quadro 4000M score rather high for a mobile/laptop GPU. It is about the same speed as the desktop GeForce GTX 550 Ti, which has some gaming credibility.

thenetavenger said,

Um, ok couple of things...

1) The GPU is DirectX11 and not all 'workstation graphics' software uses OpenGL, a lot of software uses DirectX11 and or NVidia specific CUDA or CL in addition to DirectX or OpenGL.

2) OpenGL is not 'more advanced' than DirectX, the reason is that OpenGL features 'trail' DirectX, and catch up, often with about 20% lower performance than DirectX.

3) The hardware 'reference' architecture is based on DirectX technologies, as is true of almost all current GPU technology. The shader technology and the newer DMA and I/O technology on modern GPUs are based on the Microsoft Hardware reference design of the XBox 360 GPU. That is where unified shaders that are 'code' agnostic come from, along with the new DMA and I/O features that allow CUDA 2.0 from NVidia to even function.


Even though the 'workstation graphics' cards are not marketed for gaming, they perform very well in gaming, as they are just 'variations' of the traditional consumer grade 'Geforce'.

Here is a good place to use as a basic reference of comparison for 'gaming'. The Quadro 4000M score rather high for a mobile/laptop GPU. It is about the same speed as the desktop GeForce GTX 550 Ti, which has some gaming credibility.

The question isn't whether OpenGL is more advanced than DirectX, most modeling apps use OpenGL and not DirectX which is why this machine went with it as it is being sold as a high end workstation.

The quadro's have poor DirectX performance. That is why, if they had a Radeon HD, even 6670, I would get one for home. Since it is all in one with non-upgradeable Video, I would not buy it for home. Hope that clarifies the point.

jd100 said,
I thought they were getting out of this business?

Apparently the former CEO didn't communicate that very well hence him being the former CEO.

Jarrichvdv said,
I hope they don't fill these tablets with bloatware just like they do with their laptops.

I hate that.

Jarrichvdv said,
I hope they don't fill these tablets with bloatware just like they do with their laptops.

Never thought about that .

But good news is that WIndows has it's refresh option. .

Jarrichvdv said,
I hope they don't fill these tablets with bloatware just like they do with their laptops.

You could always buy it from the Microsoft store, there all computers are shipped vanilla.

....
Of course it will have bloatware, this is how vendors make extra money.
Will a Windows Refresh on a machine with bloatwear include the bloatwear again?

I don't care what anyone thinks. These are some very exciting times. I can't wait for the day that tablets are an everyday thing. I'll be picking one up for sure this holiday season but in a few years when we start seeing some really powerful devices, that'll be nice. This design does look nice. It'll be a hard decision based on the rumours/confirmations of the amount of devices coming. It looks as though the OEM's are taking Windows 8 seriously. Can't wait!

UndergroundWire said,
No thank you. I'll stick to my 64-bit, 8GB RAM laptop.

The Slate 8 is also x64 (mobile i5 - likely based on Ivy Bridge), and, like the Series 7 today, likely 8 GB of RAM. Also, how old is that laptop? How does the battery life compare to the existing Series 7?

PGHammer said,

The Slate 8 is also x64 (mobile i5 - likely based on Ivy Bridge), and, like the Series 7 today, likely 8 GB of RAM. Also, how old is that laptop? How does the battery life compare to the existing Series 7?


I paid $700 for a Core i7, 1TB HDD, 8GB DDR3 RAM 17" Laptop. I doubt any Slate can compete with that. Let's be serious now. Please factor in price, specs not just how cute and thin it is.

I would bet hard-earned money it won't cost less than $1,199. Another opportunity for MS and HP to screw it up big time. I'm hoping for a $600-800 range, but I don't think it will happen.

JJMustang said,
I would bet hard-earned money it won't cost less than $1,199. Another opportunity for MS and HP to screw it up big time. I'm hoping for a $600-800 range, but I don't think it will happen.

And it would have to be priced that low *why*?

Consider that the SAMSUNG Series 7 *today* costs $1100 (neither Windows 8 or even an IB-based refresh will raise the price any), and it's a quad-core-based tablet that can run any application for Windows 7 (which no non-Windows tablet or slate can do). Yes - it's more than an iPad; however, it's less than a MBP (and rather neatly splits the price difference between the two like a Pro Bowl field-goal kicker). If HP merely stays within the same price range of the Series 7, some business users (primarily mobile users) will bite.

JJMustang said,
I would bet hard-earned money it won't cost less than $1,199. Another opportunity for MS and HP to screw it up big time. I'm hoping for a $600-800 range, but I don't think it will happen.

Doubtful, considering this is more than just a tablet like the iPad. I would rather pay a premium price upfront for better quality and design. I pretty much refuse to buy any laptop these days under $1000 based on past experiences

PGHammer said,

And it would have to be priced that low *why*?

Consider that the SAMSUNG Series 7 *today* costs $1100 (neither Windows 8 or even an IB-based refresh will raise the price any), and it's a quad-core-based tablet that can run any application for Windows 7 (which no non-Windows tablet or slate can do). Yes - it's more than an iPad; however, it's less than a MBP (and rather neatly splits the price difference between the two like a Pro Bowl field-goal kicker). If HP merely stays within the same price range of the Series 7, some business users (primarily mobile users) will bite.

The Series 7 Slate is a dual core. If it had a keyboard dock accessory it could become a full-fledged notebook replacement. It would essentially be an Ultrabook when docked. It has the same specifications as the SB based Ultrabooks. Same processor, same RAM, SSD, etc. The IVB refresh will probably have the same specifications as IVB ultrabooks. They REALLY need to make a keyboard dock available for that thing! I would rebuy one instantly.

JJMustang said,
I would bet hard-earned money it won't cost less than $1,199. Another opportunity for MS and HP to screw it up big time. I'm hoping for a $600-800 range, but I don't think it will happen.

Depends on if they cheapen the hardware like Apple does or provides the quality some users are willing to pay.

A generic touch screen versus a full digitizer touch screen is still a jump in cost, and Windows Tablets have in the past almost all had the digitizer quality screens.

The iPad touch screen technology was too low quality for Windows TabletPC.
*(Pressure sensitive, Pen/Stylus, Angle/Tilt, high resolution tracking, for drawing and handwriting recognition - something TabletPC users have enjoyed since 2002 that Apple made no longer cool - because they needed cheap for the iPad.)

sanke1 said,

Yes!!! Please do not put that junk called Atom in it.

CPU technology is the renewed hardware religion.

An interesting concept is that the first generation Atom 270 was faster than a higher clocked Pentium 4 w/HT, and used a lot less power. When you look at the timeline of when the Pentium 4 was not longer being sold and the introduction of the Atom 270, it is only a couple of years.

There are even some newer Pentium/Celeron CPUs in discount PCs now that aren't any faster than an Atom.

As 'slow' as the Atom 270 netbooks seem today, they are faster than the old Pentium4 systems people are still using.

thenetavenger said,
There are even some newer Pentium/Celeron CPUs in discount PCs now that aren't any faster than an Atom.

As 'slow' as the Atom 270 netbooks seem today, they are faster than the old Pentium4 systems people are still using.

I really don't think so. Looking at the $300 AMD powered laptops, they're all faster than the Atom. You may be right that the Atom is slightly faster than the Pentium 4, but that isn't saying much at all. The Pentium 4 is extremely outdated and very slow by today's standards. Atoms are very crappy processors that don't belong in anything costing over $400.

BigBoy said,

You mean like this: http://us.acer.com/ac/en/US/content/iconia-tab-w500

(been using it for ~6 months now with W8 and it's pretty nice; of course no 8 hour battery life so new hardware will be a must for that)


That's a nice tablet. I'd rather get something more like the Samsung Series 7 Sate, though, for performance reasons. Unfortunately, the Samsung is over twice the price. The resolution on the Acer also isn't high enough for Metro Snap.

rfirth said,

That's a nice tablet. I'd rather get something more like the Samsung Series 7 Sate, though, for performance reasons. Unfortunately, the Samsung is over twice the price. The resolution on the Acer also isn't high enough for Metro Snap.

I don't know what Samsung was thinking not making a keyboard dock. It's such an obvious accessory.

mrp04 said,

I don't know what Samsung was thinking not making a keyboard dock. It's such an obvious accessory.

Keyboard docks are ok but I'd be willing to spend a bit more to get a device that's a hybrid and lets me switch between tablet and ultra thin notebook when I need to type something.

GP007 said,

Keyboard docks are ok but I'd be willing to spend a bit more to get a device that's a hybrid and lets me switch between tablet and ultra thin notebook when I need to type something.


That's what I want. But I'd also like to be able to completely remove the keyboard, if desired.

GP007 said,

Keyboard docks are ok but I'd be willing to spend a bit more to get a device that's a hybrid and lets me switch between tablet and ultra thin notebook when I need to type something.

There are plenty of convertible designs, such as the HP 2740p that I own. Unfortunately rotating hinges seem to add a lot of thickness to the chassis. I don't think they can make them very thin and keep them sturdy.

There is the Lenovo Yoga with a 360 degree hinge, but that leaves the keyboard exposed when in tablet mode.

A keyboard dock will let you switch between tablet and thin notebook. Just connect the keyboard dock and it becomes a thin laptop, unplug the dock and it becomes a slate. Just like the ASUS Transformer android tablets.

rfirth said,

That's what I want. But I'd also like to be able to completely remove the keyboard, if desired.

That is what keyboard docks are. Or do you want a rotating hinge PLUS a docking connector to let you completely remove the tablet?

Another option would be a keyboard dock with a docking connector that can be connected in either orientation. You could plug it in one way to become a laptop or the other way to keep the keyboard section attached with the screen facing outwards. This would be useful if the dock had more features than just a mouse and keyboard, such as an extra battery or more expansion ports.

mrp04 said,

That is what keyboard docks are. Or do you want a rotating hinge PLUS a docking connector to let you completely remove the tablet?

I want a rotating hinge so that I can close it and carry it like a laptop - no separate pieces. But then have the screen detach into a slate if desired.

rfirth said,

I want a rotating hinge so that I can close it and carry it like a laptop - no separate pieces. But then have the screen detach into a slate if desired.

By rotating I mean tablet PCs, not just the normal motion of a laptop.
This is a rotating hinge
http://gottabemobile.wpengine....-Top-Down-Twist-Display.jpg

This is a ASUS transformer with normal keyboard dock. When the slate is docked into the keyboard dock it can be shut like a normal notebook.
http://zapp2.staticworld.net/r...king_station_1189235_g4.jpg

Are you saying you want the transformer keyboard dock, or do you want a rotating hinge AND removable? Rotating is hard enough to make thin and sturdy, also having it removable would be great but I doubt we will see that anytime soon. All the tablets with rotating hinges are not thin, it might not be possible to make it very thin and sturdy.

Keyboard docks are easy enough to make. I wish Samsung will make it for the slate refresh or HP for this thing. Rotating plus removable would be AWESOME but I just don't see it happening.

rev23dev said,
Love it! I was planning on a Samsung, but... might come down to who is out first between HP and the Samsung.

I'm simply open for every Windows 8 tablet XD

pack34 said,
Looks nice, but wish it had a fingerprint reader.

The photo login feature of Windows 8 is more secure than a fingerprint reader, nearly as fast and doesn't require more hardware. (Many OEMS have front camera login devices as well)

Fingerprint readers are nice for consumers, but very easy to crack.