Internal Microsoft poster identifies the driving force behind Windows Threshold

When building software, hardware or anything, there needs to be an underlying theme to keep the features focused on accomplishing the purpose of the project. For Microsoft, they want Windows Threshold to be deeply personal and allow you to do great things.

You can see the poster at the top of this post, which is said to be from inside the walls of Microsoft where the engineering team is building the next installment of Windows. 

The poster (and the underlying themes) very much have a Nadella style to them by focusing on the personal level of computing and allowing customers to do great things. If you have ever heard Satya speak, it's nearly impossible to read this poster in anything other than his voice.

Building an OS that will be used by billions of people around the world during its lifecycle is never an easy task but as Microsoft says, "the world needs Windows" because without it, there would be a gap in the market that is not easily filled.

While the poster may not reveal anything about Windows Threshold, you can check out our scoops of features here, here, here and here but the poster does offers a small view inside the world of building Windows.

Source: Re/code

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People do great things on different devices. So, make sure the Operating System have UIs that are suitable to the wide range of devices users use--tablets, laptops, and desktops. Let the user choose the UI that is most appropriate.

This seems to be such a basic point, but for some reason Sinofsky or someone in Windows dev was bent on changing the way people used every single computer, not just tablets running RT. I never understood why there wasn't a preferred UI selection.

There's a reason the classic desktop has been around forever.... it works.

shastasheen said,
This seems to be such a basic point, but for some reason Sinofsky or someone in Windows dev was bent on changing the way people used every single computer, not just tablets running RT. I never understood why there wasn't a preferred UI selection.

There's a reason the classic desktop has been around forever.... it works.

Metro was meant to unify platforms. That's why you see it on Windows 8 and why it'll still be in Threshold. That's why you see it on XBox One. And that's also why you see it on Windows Phone.

The desktop is still there in Windows 8, and it still "works", it sounds as if it's finally getting the 21st Century facelift it needs to survive in Threshold.

Love the words but all it ever seems to result in is a lame attempt to copy a competitor and in doing so, remove features that are loved.

Fix IE's toolbar problem when it comes to non internet shortcuts, add more options to the control panel and for heavens sake, sort out the folder picture preview so we can see full images on folder like we could in XP instead of half a picture since Vista!! Allow drag and drop/cut and paste in Hyper V, basically just add the great options from previous OS or software release that for some crazy reason you have removed.

I understand that basic users don't need to be confused by lots of options but please remember us seasoned users in our 30's. Add options that we need to access via the control panel, do whatever, just add them because Windows is becoming something that feels like an initial or basic OS for a PVR or basic internet enabled tablet.

Hopefully next Windows will be great. Every 2 versions is like that : Windows 98 was good, Windows ME was crap, Windows XP was great, Windows Vista was crap, Windows 7 was awesome, Windows 8/8.1 was crap, so I expect Windows 9 (Threshold) to be awesome.

Vista was crap? What are you smoking.
Vista was the basis for Windows 7, and without it, Windows 7 and 8 would have been terrible and slow just like XP was

So true. Vista's image was harmed by the Windows Longhorn preview screenshots that found their way on to the web, a couple of years before Vista released. Longhorn was originally slated to have a slew of features, but those were scuttled in favor of making the O/S more secure. The Trustworthy computing initiative wasn't sexy, but it was required. Microsoft was more than candid and open with vendors and partners on the new driver model and hardware requirements yet some vendors chose to ignore them. Most of Vista's initial issues were fixed with service packs and it became quite a reliable O/S. Vista was nowhere near as bad an O/S as misinformed haters would like to believe.

Lamp0 said,
So this mean Threshold will support custom themes!!!

That would be the best new feature ever! No more 3rd party needed!

No reason to NOT do this!

Dot Matrix said,

Windows already supports custom themes.

You mean changing the color of the window frame?

DAMN! it's a like a whole new look!

not.

Lamp0 said,

You mean changing the color of the window frame?

DAMN! it's a like a whole new look!

not.

I wouldn't expect Threshold to support custom skinning anymore than Windows 8, 7, Vista, and XP did before it. It creates a risk for system users, and a support nightmare for Microsoft.

UXGaurav said,
LOL. Typical larger than life projection of Windows. :p

There's a lot of truth to statement "the world needs Windows".

This is internal poster to drive force the team? Come on, there are more inspiring quote out there, or use images or picture will so much better

Actually the concept is good. Windows Phone tagline is "world's most personal mobile OS" with its editable live tiles and other feature, so Windows as the world's most personal desktop OS is make sense.

fusi0n said,
Hopefully it won't suck.

Every other year, man.

(Kidding... but only kind of. It seems to be the big changes come in a year and they get hated right away, then Microsoft responds to the feedback and things get refined for the better and everyone's happy.)

Anthony Tosie said,

Every other year, man.

(Kidding... but only kind of. It seems to be the big changes come in a year and they get hated right away, then Microsoft responds to the feedback and things get refined for the better and everyone's happy.)


lol, true.. I have faith in them for this one

I really appreciate that with Windows 8, for once, MS didn't play it safe. They stepped out and did something bold and risky. Some of that risk came back to bite them when a pretty good sector of users shied away from making the plunge, but I really like where they are headed. If they can address the complaints enough to get sales moving without compromising the overall vision, I think they will really have something great.