Microsoft gives hints on future cloud-based Xbox 360 features

Microsoft may be ready to offer cloud-based save games for the Xbox 360 console with the next Dashboard update but that's not the only thing the company has planned for cloud-based gaming. Gamasutra reports that during a speech at the Game Developers Conference in Shanghai, China this weekend, Microsoft's cloud evangelist Brian Prince said, " ... you will be seeing things in the Xbox platform that's cloud-specific. I'm already doing it, it's really exciting, but I can't tell you about it or else I'll get fired."

Cloud-based gaming launched in a big way in June 2010 with OnLive which offers gamers a way to play even graphically intensive games on nearly any desktop, notebook or television. A rival service, Gaikai, launched in early 2011 but has concentrated on free game demos via streaming. GameStop has announced plans to offer a cloud-based gaming service sometime in 2012.

Even Price believes that cloud-based streaming gaming is going to become popular eventually. Speaking of OnLive and Gaikai, he said, "These are really gaming platforms as a service. There are some limitations here, but I really do think this is the distant future of gaming in the cloud."

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I must say I belonged to onlive since it started and its good and bad first good is never have to download a game to your hard drive,and you never have to update,online play is just as good as any other online gaming.And alot of more software companies are starting to join them adding alot more upcoming games.the bad side is they do not support sli/cfx cards setup so as for me which i have cfx 5870 I have to play with one card.suppose to in the near future multi monitor support along with dual graphics card support.thier also coming out with a cloud browser onlive which is suppose to be fast. its the future the following software companies are changing by 2012
xbox 360
impulse/gamestop
steam
and believe it or not norton by 2013
windows 8 and games for windows
its the future.

sirmark said,
I must say I belonged to onlive since it started and its good and bad first good is never have to download a game to your hard drive,and you never have to update,online play is just as good as any other online gaming.And alot of more software companies are starting to join them adding alot more upcoming games.the bad side is they do not support sli/cfx cards setup so as for me which i have cfx 5870 I have to play with one card.suppose to in the near future multi monitor support along with dual graphics card support.thier also coming out with a cloud browser onlive which is suppose to be fast. its the future the following software companies are changing by 2012
xbox 360
impulse/gamestop
steam
and believe it or not norton by 2013
windows 8 and games for windows
its the future.

"[...],online play is just as good as any other online gaming [...]"

Please tick whatever applies. Multiple choices allowed:

Are you
[] trolling
[] joking
[] not knowing any better
[] on a SUPER old gaming rig to compare against
[] when you belonged to their team, did you get priority access to a server via intranet and never tried the real deal?

I'll give you that it somehow works, the latency is not toooo bad, but still, you CANNOT be serious about it being viable on a HD screen with more than a crappy video card.

GS:mac

Sign me out for anything cloud-based that leaves me with no local control.
AKA OnLive principle etc...

Steam cloud-based save game synching? HELL YES! Still got my local files.

Cloud-only <something>... NO!

Me 2¢.

I like my file and cost control.
I don't want the bookkeeper to decide it's time to kiss my favorite retro game goodbye, because it's not economic keeping it on the servers anymore.

GTFO.

Local FTW.

Why don't we all just set up our own home clouds?
Mini servers!

That's what I'd like to see...

GS:mac

I would love to have my own cloud. I guess I'm kind of doing that, but it involves having a lot of storage. I am constantly running out of space.

E:win

GS - I agree. Especially if I'm going to pay full price (or at least close to it) for some form of media, I would much rather have the physical copy in my possession. Relinquishing all control to the cloud is not for me!

este said,
GS - I agree. Especially if I'm going to pay full price (or at least close to it) for some form of media, I would much rather have the physical copy in my possession. Relinquishing all control to the cloud is not for me!

When beamers are invented, we will use household items etc on a subscription basis, too!
Just ask for the mixer and boom it's there!
Always with the comfort of being able to "quick rent" up to TWO items on your maximum tarif!
For example oven + pan.
Need a knife to cut the meat real quick?
Any additional item is just 50¢ per use!!!

Service up-time guarantee!*

*Provided the internation beaming system is not out of service

GREAT! SIGN ME UP!
</s>

GS:mac

Definitely not ready for dedicated cloud based gaming no matter how appealing it may sound right now.

este said,
Definitely not ready for dedicated cloud based gaming no matter how appealing it may sound right now.

Oh don't worry, it's not OnLive calibre features he's talking about.
I can't post details about it or I'll get banned, but it is good.

Who seriously bothers playing on OnLive? Stupidest idea ever. I tried their demo service and I couldn't care less. It just doesn't feel proper

Quick Shot said,
Who seriously bothers playing on OnLive? Stupidest idea ever. I tried their demo service and I couldn't care less. It just doesn't feel proper

this,
and how the hell can you properly play a game on multiplayer through this without being dead 5sec before you see it yourself

Quick Shot, You are obviously clueless about tech. All of 2011 technology innovations are going to be obsolete in 46 days. The future of gaming is dumb terminals connecting wirelessly at gigabit speeds to the cloud. While Onlive is not 100% perfect, it is much much more than a proof of concept.

raghavny80 said,
Quick Shot, You are obviously clueless about tech. All of 2011 technology innovations are going to be obsolete in 46 days. The future of gaming is dumb terminals connecting wirelessly at gigabit speeds to the cloud. While Onlive is not 100% perfect, it is much much more than a proof of concept.

Raghavny, you are obviously clueless about reality. Large of amounts of the US still don't have access to decent internet speeds. Why would you want to use a dumb terminal when local processing is so cheap? You're basically giving up control over your files to some company. And you bet the'll try to monetize these services as much as they can. Also what happens when you don't have internet access? You're screwed.

Quick Shot said,
Who seriously bothers playing on OnLive? Stupidest idea ever. I tried their demo service and I couldn't care less. It just doesn't feel proper

Eventually it's system may be the future of console gaming. But not until super fast broadband is ubiquitous - which is frankly the biggest problem with trying to go fully digital distribution at the moment. Sure, people who live in big cities will be able to live with it, they get good internet connections. But, once you start going more rural, things degrade and a large number of people are just left out in the dark. Heck, even in London there a LOT of people still stuck on 2MB connections.

Quick Shot said,
Who seriously bothers playing on OnLive? Stupidest idea ever. I tried their demo service and I couldn't care less. It just doesn't feel proper

I tried Onlive about 6 months ago. While it wasn't perfect, it was TOTALLY playable and pretty impressive actually.

Zanfall said,
what happens when you don't have internet access? You're screwed.

Blasphemy! I haven't been offline for more than an hour in the last 10 years.

Zanfall said,

Raghavny, you are obviously clueless about reality. Large of amounts of the US still don't have access to decent internet speeds. Why would you want to use a dumb terminal when local processing is so cheap? You're basically giving up control over your files to some company. And you bet the'll try to monetize these services as much as they can. Also what happens when you don't have internet access? You're screwed.

I moved my emails to a cloud service in 1997. I moved my office documents to a cloud service in 2008. Since 2010, I stopped using DVDs and stream all my video content from the cloud. Apple / Google launched cloud music services in 2011. So if some company tries to control all my cloud data, games will be the least of my priorities.
Yes, I agree that if I don't have internet today, I am screwed (Remember ppl in UK voted facebook as more important than a toilet).
I do agree that the Streaming Video Games are not really going to be successful in Republic of Congo. Lots of people in US may not have access to decent internet speeds. But do you also know that lots of people in the US do have access to decent internet speeds.

raghavny80 said,
Lots of people in US may not have access to decent internet speeds. But do you also know that lots of people in the US do have access to decent internet speeds.

Quoting for emphasis. While I don't use OnLive, that doesn't mean others shouldn't.

Zanfall said,

Raghavny, you are obviously clueless about reality. Large of amounts of the US still don't have access to decent internet speeds. Why would you want to use a dumb terminal when local processing is so cheap? You're basically giving up control over your files to some company. And you bet the'll try to monetize these services as much as they can. Also what happens when you don't have internet access? You're screwed.

You actually are clueless on the breakdown of the population in the US. 79% of Americans live in urban areas (access to high speed internet). The other 21% of American who live in the rural areas have a much higher concentration of older people (they don't play videos games online and are not the XBOX target market). Big deal if the rural areas are left out... you apparently forgot that large areas do not translate into more people.

Tomer2000 said,

You actually are clueless on the breakdown of the population in the US. 79% of Americans live in urban areas (access to high speed internet). The other 21% of American who live in the rural areas have a much higher concentration of older people (they don't play videos games online and are not the XBOX target market). Big deal if the rural areas are left out... you apparently forgot that large areas do not translate into more people.

Ah yes, because the FCC considers 768k DSL as high speed. Remove that number and a better high speed number available to US based humanity is quite low. Let's put the number at 5Mbps and see where the US ranks?

And don't use the size straw man argument. If as you say population is concentrated, then cities like NY, Miami, San Diego and Los Angeles should be sporting at least 100Mbps service to the home, and it isn't happening. FIOS has 150Mbps service for $150 in very select neighborhoods, while entire countries have it around the world, and some at Gbps.

schubb2003 said,

Ah yes, because the FCC considers 768k DSL as high speed. Remove that number and a better high speed number available to US based humanity is quite low. Let's put the number at 5Mbps and see where the US ranks?

And don't use the size straw man argument. If as you say population is concentrated, then cities like NY, Miami, San Diego and Los Angeles should be sporting at least 100Mbps service to the home, and it isn't happening. FIOS has 150Mbps service for $150 in very select neighborhoods, while entire countries have it around the world, and some at Gbps.

Way to go off on a tangent...straw man indeed. This article AND the discussions are about cloud based XBOX 360 features and gaming. Streaming games online via Onlive has been able to work at 2Mbps with their recent update. Games can be streamed online to HDTVs needing 3-6 Mbps via Onlive. Why you even brought up 100Mbps and 150Mbps is beyond me.... you don't need those speeds to stream games online.

Zanfall said,
Also what happens when you don't have internet access? You're screwed.

What happens if you go offline during a game with Online DRM Authentication?

Tomer2000 said,

Way to go off on a tangent...straw man indeed. This article AND the discussions are about cloud based XBOX 360 features and gaming. Streaming games online via Onlive has been able to work at 2Mbps with their recent update. Games can be streamed online to HDTVs needing 3-6 Mbps via Onlive. Why you even brought up 100Mbps and 150Mbps is beyond me.... you don't need those speeds to stream games online.

Well you see, I look at the big picture, average speed in the US is 5Mbps, you say two for gaming...great. My wife is using her laptop, my son is watching Netflix, now I have reduced connectivity, with true 5.1 surround and 720p, 2Mbps is not even remotely close enough to speed.

Kirkburn said,
schubb2003, and? You do not represent everyone, so I don't really understand your point.

Ok, little words here. The US is lacking in high speed connectivity to a large portion of its population. A majority of those who do have access to it have data transfer caps.

Cloud based services require speed and large data transfers, putting together speed and large data transfer with questionable speed and caps is ridiculous. ISPs keep reducing connectivity, but content providers keep pushing the "cloud"...

I get that not all people have internet services that work for it - but that doesn't mean such services aren't viable. Obviously they're not going to force people to use services they don't have, because they get zero customers out of it.