Microsoft Security Essentials gets certified

AV-Test.org, a group with more than 15 years of experience in the area of anti-virus research and data security, has given Microsoft Security Essentials their certificate of approval. They tested 19 anti-virus and security applications in the second quarter this year, all but four certified: Trend Micro Internet Security Pro 2010, BullGuard Internet Security 9.0, Norman Security Suite 8.0 and McAfee Internet Security 2010.

The AV-Test team said, "During April, May and June 2010 we continuously evaluated 19 security products using their default settings. We always used the most current publicly available version of all products for the testing. They were allowed to update themselves at any time and query their in-the-cloud services. We focused on realistic test scenarios and challenged the products against real-world threats. Products had to demonstrate their capabilities using all components and protection layers."

The products were tested according to following categories:

  • Protection - static and dynamic malware detection, including testing for real-world 0-Day attacks.
  • Repair - system disinfection and rootkit removal
  • Usability - amount of system slow-down caused by the tools and the number of false positives.

The anti-virus applications were scored from 0.0 (worst) to 6.0 (best), Windows Security Essentials scored a 4.0 in Protection, a 4.5 in Repair and a 5.5 in Usability.

The Windows Security Blog was happy about the certification and said, "the most important validation of AV quality comes from independent certification organizations like VB100, AV-Test and others. With the current version of Microsoft Security Essentials and the new version now available in beta, our commitment remains constant: to provide security you can trust that is easy to use and provides protection that runs quietly and efficiently in the background, ensuring a great Windows user experience."

The three applications that tested highest were Kaspersky Internet Security 2010, Symantec Norton Internet Security 2010 and Panda Internet Security 2010. None of the applications tested scored higher than a 5.5.

Thanks to forum user Shayla for the news tip.

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Aanuun said,
I refuse to use MSE. My school for my Network Admin Diploma deployed it across all client-side computers, and god was it a resource hog. The heuristics just suck up so many CPU cycles its ridiculous. And having used it for a while, and having had a sneaking suspiscion I had some virus', I ran a scan with MSE, it was clean. Ran one with Malwarebyte's Anti-Malware of all things, and boom, 2 Trojan's. So its back to ESET Smart Security 4. Maybe overzealous sometimes, but I have NEVER had an issue I could find a solution for on ESET's website. If I had to go free, I'd go with Avast! or Avira. Microsoft Security Essential's just doesn't cut it for me.

cheap arse admins trying get away without paying for an corporate capable AV solution like Forefront

Since everybody's PC configs are different, everybody's mileage *will* vary.

That being said, Intel overpaid for McAfee and most AV solutions are bloatware first-and-foremost. MSE is the lightest AV program right now. Any resource hog complainers should try running Firefox -- then watch the resource disappear before your ever own eyes. (Especially true with Firefox 4 Beta 3.)

Nas said,
Since everybody's PC configs are different, everybody's mileage *will* vary.

That being said, Intel overpaid for McAfee and most AV solutions are bloatware first-and-foremost. MSE is the lightest AV program right now. Any resource hog complainers should try running Firefox -- then watch the resource disappear before your ever own eyes. (Especially true with Firefox 4 Beta 3.)

Why are we suddenly bringing a browser debate into the mix?

So...which is ultimately better, MSE or Avast 5 Free? I've used Avast for years, and also beta-tested MSE, and never could decide which seemed to do it's job better.

2Cold Scorpio said,
So...which is ultimately better, MSE or Avast 5 Free? I've used Avast for years, and also beta-tested MSE, and never could decide which seemed to do it's job better.

i love avast! The only other AV I've used in McAfee.

2Cold Scorpio said,
So...which is ultimately better, MSE or Avast 5 Free? I've used Avast for years, and also beta-tested MSE, and never could decide which seemed to do it's job better.

MSE fewer false positives

I like the fact you gave credit to who originally posted the article. Well done man, not many writers do.

soldier1st said,
mse is always a cpu/memory hog so that should be tested as well so then ms would get thier act together and fix it.

Post computer specs, since statements like this sound like someone with 512mb ram and 1.5ghz cpu complaining. lol

IntelliMoo said,

Post computer specs, since statements like this sound like someone with 512mb ram and 1.5ghz cpu complaining. lol

If other companies can make programs to run on legacy hardware, why can't MS?

Should he upgrade his machine just to run AV? Just because someone mentions that's it's a hog, one of the fanboys ALWAYS has to say "No it's not!".

Just because it's not slow for you, doesn't mean it runs great for everyone else. Just so you know, every machine is different.

farmeunit said,

If other companies can make programs to run on legacy hardware, why can't MS?

Should he upgrade his machine just to run AV? Just because someone mentions that's it's a hog, one of the fanboys ALWAYS has to say "No it's not!".

Just because it's not slow for you, doesn't mean it runs great for everyone else. Just so you know, every machine is different.

Because MS is an forward thinking company there comes a time when legacy hardware should be just that legacy even the manufactures stop supporting legacy hardware why shouldn't MS.. I've a friend with an Athlon XP 3200+ with 1GB DR400 ram and winXP MSE runs perfectly fine on it

Trend Micro Internet Security Pro 2010, BullGuard Internet Security 9.0, Norman Security Suite 8.0 and McAfee Internet Security 2010

Didn't Intel just buy McAfee?

Well after i keep hearing people praise MSE on this website i finally took the plunge and installed MSE and my initial impressions are definitely positive so far. (i am using it on Win7 Home Pre x64. i got 64bit version of MSE)

p.s. i previously had Avira AV and it was good overall but false detections seemed to be a issue from time to time where as a file Avira claims is a virus MSE does not complain about.

Had MSE installed on all computers at home being updated daily. All the computers were infected with a variant of a rather common rootkit and MSE reported nothing. Only after I scanned the computer with another antivirus did a window pop up warning of it by MSE. By this time, the rootkit installed a bunch of other viruses, which it was unable to detect.

I don't plan to trust MSE ever again, as it was unable to detect hardly anything.

COKid said,
More specifics please, zivan56.

+1 must have been infected before MSE was installed and as an general rule rootkits are very hard to find once installed they play hide and seek with the OS any OS

For those not running W7, don't mind this post. The tests are referring explicitly to W7: Certifications for the 2nd Quarter 2010 (Windows 7). A good editor would've mention something like that in the title!

I have been using MSE for quite some time and currently beta testing the next version. I like the fact that it just sits in the background without seeking attention all the time, takes nearly no resources and just does what it is meant to be doing. I have to admit that the beta version is more aware of dodge websites compared to the first one. Windows 7 Firewall + MSE + UAC and I feel I am secure enough and bloatware free.

Mike Frett said,
Interesting McAfee did not get certified, makes you think wtf was Intel thinking.

Intel didn't buy Mcstuffies for its software AV product but rather some IP they own for hardware AV products which Intel is looking at adding to either it's CPU's or network gear in the future...

Mike Frett said,
Interesting McAfee did not get certified, makes you think wtf was Intel thinking.

Just a normal day for an Intel CEO

Intel CEO: "We need antivirus, can someone buy me McAfee?"

Few hours later:
"Done."
Intel CEO: "Great, which version?"
"Version ... ?"

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