More conflict for Microsoft

The European Commission is to conduct another competition investigation into Microsoft after more complaints from the software giant's rivals. But, despite the apparent parallels with a case lost by Microsoft last September, the new claim may not be as similar as it seems.

The latest Commission investigation will go ahead following December's allegations from Norwegian browser firm Opera that Microsoft makes it hard for rivals of Internet Explorer (IE) to run on Windows.

View: The full story @ vnunet

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exactly, they just want to be able to compete honestly. And since the EC market is about thrice that of the US market they are going to comply, albeit in their usual 2 steps forward one step back kind of way.

Other browsers may seem to be a steeming pile of **** not because they are lousy coders but because they just don't have access to the same api as MS has. There is no way that any coder can replace entirely explorer as a desktop organiser. Since ie is just explorer with a web module attached,MS has unfair advantage as it is very easy for a user to use ie because it is in fact identical to the desktop browser and window manager. No 3rd party has this capability so logically it is difficult for a 3rd party to compete. Their product will never have the same level of integration.

Best action for the EC would be to forbid ie all together, and let only 3rd party browsers in. That way they can compete honestly on their merits. Or to have MS give equal access toreplace explorer on all levels with a 3rd party interface. Given the huge market not just in the EC but worldwide as compared to the quit limited homemarket they will just have to adapt or be fined out of the market.

i see that people that are bashing opera have NO idea of what its going on, opera did this to promote competition and open standards, they are not looking into monetary damages...

I agree; it's the usual reactionary comments. Due to the kind of case this is, and about competition, that's also why the EU got involved, and why Opera didn't simply fire off a lawsuit.

If opera can hire proper coders to do their software then should move out the way and let other browsers take over.

I find it funny that the only time I see Opera on the news is beacause they are suing microsoft. Bot because they came out with the latest and greatest piece of software that will make online browsing better.

as noted before, you cant get opera without ie installed. second because MS's noncompliant html coding quite a lot of sites support only ie browsers which makes it in fact not difficult but impossible to access without ie. 3rd, as ms has moved large chunks of the browser to the systemcore ie has a much tighter integration with windows thereby letting the other browers look poorly by comparison. It's like the infamous hidden code in Windows 3.0 which checked if it ran on another dos then msdos. If it didn't it would randomly fail so MS could blame it on the other dos.

Here ie runs core components which the other browsers have no or limited access to thus limiting their performance andmaking it 'difficult' to compete on an even keel.

Be grateful the EU protects even the cowardly americans by standing up to a monopolist.

(petrossa said @ #8 )
...because MS's noncompliant html coding quite a lot of sites support only ie browsers which makes it in fact not difficult but impossible to access without ie.

So what you're saying is that all web sites can be divided into two categories: "compliant" sites that support pretty much any browser - including IE - and "noncompliant" ones that only support IE, right?

Sounds to me like pretty much all websites support IE. And since millions of people are using IE without problem or complaint, that would mean that third party browsers such as Firefox and Opera are - strictly speaking - unnecessary. Moreover, since these browsers are both unnecessary and freely available to download to anyone who wants them anyway...

Download Firefox - Free 2.0.0.11 for Windows, English (US) (5.7MB)

Opera for Windows, Free Download, Version 9.25

...It begs the question as to why any government agency anywhere should be stirring up a load of crap on behalf of companies who can't even reasonably demonstrate that their products are necessary! Never mind that they should be foisted on the public by bureaucratic fiat.

And yet the EC is doing just that. Well, there's no need to ask for their reasons: we all know they've got about 500 million of them.

The fact of the matter is that your entire post is a fraudulent, steaming pile of stinking bullsh�t. If you and your kind weren't such a bunch of intellectually dishonest weasels, you would just say that you hate Microsoft: that you oppose everything that it does, and that your most fervent wish is that Bill Gates and everyone who works for him would drop dead.

Why don't you try that from now on? It would save everyone a lot of time - not to mention the nauseating experience of wading through your pathetic and transparent failures of logic and reason.

"Microsoft makes it hard for rivals of Internet Explorer (IE) to run on Windows."

Oops! Should say

"Opera's garbage browser makes it hard for anyone to want to replace IE with it."

Opera should be suing themselves. It would at least make more sense than whining to the EU to go after Microsoft's money again.

The opera browser looks ugly and bloating. Who wants something that is just going to bloat their OS. At least Firefox is leaner. The time of recession is the time of suing to stay in business. Stupid companies need to get a grip of themselves.

Looks bloated? How can it look bloated? Firefox is the one with the memory leaks, not Opera ... it is far, far, leaner and quicker.

As for ugly, it looks about the same as Firefox to me ... they pretty much all look a like.

Ugly or not, should be judged by the users.

As mentioned above, just visit opera.com and download Opera, and don't see any difficulties of installing Opera on a Windows machine.

Opera just want some noise in web browser market.

Haha, what a joke.

(jesseinsf said @ #5)
The opera browser looks ugly and bloating. Who wants something that is just going to bloat their OS. At least Firefox is leaner.

No, Opera is leaner than Firefox, at least if we're still talking memory and disk footprint.

Built an application? Sue Microsoft for doing so too.
Next thing you know, people will be suing Microsoft for bundling Notepad with Windows.

(Gerry said @ #3)
Its strange as you need IE just to download Opera! :blink:

does opera have an ftp site? if so then just do

CMD
FTP
OPEN FTP.OPERA.COM
BIN
GET FILENAMEFOROPERA.EXE


nope, no IE needed there :P

(neufuse said @ #3.1)

does opera have an ftp site? if so then just do

CMD
FTP
OPEN FTP.OPERA.COM
BIN
GET FILENAMEFOROPERA.EXE


nope, no IE needed there :P


And how many people know how to do this? Exactly.

Microsoft makes it hard for rivals of Internet Explorer (IE) to run on Windows.

1. Goto http://www.opera.com/
2. Click "Free Download"
3. Follow the onscreen instructions

Can someone tell me how this could be much simpler without microsoft directly bundling Opera with windows?

Don't ask such logical questions! Just hand over the money to EU. They have run out of the first round of funds Microsoft had to fork over.

If you try to apply logic, reasoning, or any sort of fairness to the situation then the EU wouldn't be in a position to be grabbing more money.

well i woudl assume, adn i know i shoudlnt assume things, but hey the issue is more likely with development rather than end user installation..

(C_Guy said @ #1.1)
Don't ask such logical questions! Just hand over the money to EU. They have run out of the first round of funds Microsoft had to fork over.

You do realize that these investigations are usually invoked by their competition, including this one?