Mozilla working on way to make Firefox phone calls sans plugin

Earlier this month, Mozilla announced that it was working on a way for users of its Firefox web browser to engage in video chats with users of Google's Chrome browser via the WebRTC standard. Today, Mozilla has announced a joint partnership with AT&T and Ericsson for yet another project that uses the WebRTC protocols.

Mozilla's press announcement states that the proof of concept project is designed to give Firefox browser users a way "to sync with a consumers existing phone number and provide calling services without any plugins to download." The press release adds that the new concept also involves the Web Communication Gateway from Ericsson, the Mozilla Social API, and the AT&T API Platform.

In addition to phone calls, the project has also been made to allow users to make video calls with their mobile Firefox browser along with sharing files, accessing a phone's address book, and more. This new system will be shown off this coming week for attendees who go to the Mozilla booth at the Mobile World Congress trade show in Barcelona, Spain. However, there's no word from the company on when this "proof of concept" will be ready for a public unveiling.

Source: Mozilla | Image via Mozillla

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6 Comments

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Lol like any other browser maker is really working on their browser anymore? Did you even look at what the article said? This is like iMessage but for any phone that wants to support it--from your browser.

The browser does suck a little. For basic web development, I now find IE10 the easiest to work with, followed by Chrome, followed by FF. Although, I like Chrome best for troubleshooting / development tools.

Brody McKee said,
The browser does suck a little. For basic web development, I now find IE10 the easiest to work with, followed by Chrome, followed by FF. Although, I like Chrome best for troubleshooting / development tools.

Yeah but if your site works like it should in FF. It usually does not need any work for Chrome, Safari and Opera.
While I've noticed while developing on Chrome. There where tiny things that where not the way they should be when I tested it out on FF later.

M_Lyons10 said,
Mozilla really needs to focus more on making their browser the best it can be and less on these side projects...

Everyone have different definitions of "best".
Some think those "side projects" is exactly what makes it stand out.

With Mozilla nowadays having both the MemShrink project active and making good strides in speed (they just started working on their new Javascript compiler -- see also: http://arewefastyet.com/), I'm actually pretty happy where this project is going in what I consider the core components.

Northgrove said,

Everyone have different definitions of "best".
Some think those "side projects" is exactly what makes it stand out.

With Mozilla nowadays having both the MemShrink project active and making good strides in speed (they just started working on their new Javascript compiler -- see also: http://arewefastyet.com/), I'm actually pretty happy where this project is going in what I consider the core components.


Actually they started IonMonkey over a year ago.

I agree about some of the side projects though... I started learning HTML on Thimble for example. And I can't live without Firebug.