Netflix runs on HTML5 in Windows 8.1 via IE11

In April, Netflix announced that for the web browser version of its streaming video service, it would make the move from using Microsoft's Silverlight to HTML5. Today, Netflix confirmed that people who use Internet Explorer 11 to access the service will do so using HTML5.

In a blog post, Netflix stated that the support began today with the preview version of Windows 8.1, which includes the first public version of IE11. Netflix says that Microsoft has worked to put in versions of the three specific HTML5-based APIs needed to run its videos in IE11: Media Source Extensions, Encrypted Media Extensions, and Web Cryptography API. Previously, the HTML5 support was put into Google's Chrome browser that are installed in Samsung-made ARM Chromebooks.

Netflix added:

We expect premium video on the web to continue to shift away from using proprietary plugin technologies to using these new Premium Video Extensions.  We are thrilled to work so closely with the Microsoft team on advancing the HTML5 platform, which gets a big boost today with Internet Explorer’s cutting edge support for premium video.  We look forward to these APIs being available on all browsers.

Microsoft plans to end support for the current version of Silverlight in 2021.

Source: Netflix | Image via Netflix

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That means Netflix has taken the time to write two versions of its App to support two Microsoft only proprietary formats - one for the Netflix Metro App, and another for this DRM pretending-to-be-HTM5 crap in IE that will never be embraced by the Open Web because its DRM.

But Mac users still have to use the Silverlight version? C'mon!

Netflix already wrote a Netflix App in Objective C for iOS. How hard could it be to port it to Mac already?

kayan said,
That means Netflix has taken the time to write two versions of its App to support two Microsoft only proprietary formats - one for the Netflix Metro App, and another for this DRM pretending-to-be-HTM5 crap in IE that will never be embraced by the Open Web because its DRM.

But Mac users still have to use the Silverlight version? C'mon!

Netflix already wrote a Netflix App in Objective C for iOS. How hard could it be to port it to Mac already?


The HTML5 extensions aren't Microsoft-only. I assume Apple are going to implement them too at some point.

https://dvcs.w3.org/hg/html-me...-media/encrypted-media.html

So then Netfix will use a proprietary extension. Then, the whole Netflix runs on HTML5 is only marketing stunt.

What you are looking at, folks, is the first real world implementation of DRM on the Web. While it's good that companies like Netflix and the BBC are now more willing to implement their video services using HTML instead of Flash, it's still a dark day for the Open Web.

Meph said,
What you are looking at, folks, is the first real world implementation of DRM on the Web. While it's good that companies like Netflix and the BBC are now more willing to implement their video services using HTML instead of Flash, it's still a dark day for the Open Web.

And Silverlight wasn't DRM on the Web?

An "Open Web" means that anyone can use it, and who can use it hasn't changed at all with this move. We've just gotten an alternative to those silly plugins.

Lamp Post said,

And Silverlight wasn't DRM on the Web?

An "Open Web" means that anyone can use it, and who can use it hasn't changed at all with this move. We've just gotten an alternative to those silly plugins.


Silverlight wasn't a web standard, it was just a binary that happened to support a few web browsers on Microsoft's initiative.

The difference here is that these technologies are aimed to actually be web standards, and I can see how that irks some. However, it's not all too different than having WebGL support in my opinion. Binary chunks rather than documents describing how to parse documents thrown into the standards mix in either case.

The time is long past having an average Joe able to write a web browser that is usable with most of the "open web". Way too many licensing fees for that to happen, unlike in the late nineties.

Lamp Post said,
And Silverlight wasn't DRM on the Web?

An "Open Web" means that anyone can use it, and who can use it hasn't changed at all with this move. We've just gotten an alternative to those silly plugins.


When I refer to the "Web", I don't mean the pages you see through a Web browser. I'm talking about the development platform it uses. The Open Web means anyone can use it, and plug-ins are proprietary. But "open" has connotations of more than just standards that anyone can implement. It represents good morality and freedom from restrictions as well.

Does anyone know if it's actually working yet? Netflix on Server 2012 R2 beta does not appear to work unless IE11 is dropped into IE10 emulation mode for Silverlight.

recursive said,

This is what I'm hoping and waiting for as well.

I hope you know you can already use netflix on linux, just not in a web browser

Sure, but I might as well just suck it up and put up with Winodows rather than contaminate my system with Wine and all its dependencies simply to watch a few movies / shows. Presently I simply stream from my Android phone to the TV using its HDMI port.

recursive said,
Sure, but I might as well just suck it up and put up with Winodows rather than contaminate my system with Wine and all its dependencies simply to watch a few movies / shows. Presently I simply stream from my Android phone to the TV using its HDMI port.

I would disagree that it contaminates your system but that is your choice. I have had no problems.I am only trying to help people.
for those who don't know there is ppa that can be found with a Google search that will install a wine wrapped program that performs as a web app.
all it takes is 3 lines in command line

Got it. It's just that Microsoft is forcing their will with Windows 8. They could pull a stunt and say Windows 7 won't be getting IE11.

JHBrown said,
They could pull a stunt and say Windows 7 won't be getting IE11.

Reading elsewhere that it was confirmed that IE11 will be coming to Windows 7, just no exact date given. (Shocker.)