Rumor: Intel could ditch Atom brand name for low power chips

Intel is trying to sell more PCs with its processors inside and now a new rumor claims that the company may get rid of the brand name for one of its product in order to boost sales. The Digitimes site claims, via unnamed sources, that Intel could get rid of the Atom brand sometime in the fourth quarter of 2013.

The story states that sales of PCs and tablets with Intel's current version of the Atom processor have been impacted partly because the Atom name has a negative image among consumers for poor performance. So far, Intel has not said anything officially about dumping the Atom name.

Intel's next version of the Atom processor, set for launch in late 2013, is supposed to be based on its Bay Trail architecture. In June, the company confirmed the Bay Trail design will also be used in chips made for two other older Intel processor brands. Bay Trail will be used in Celeron chips made for mobile devices and Pentium chips created for low-cost PCs.

It's possible that Intel could simply do away with the Atom brand for upcoming Windows 8.1 notebooks and tablets and have them labeled as Celeron and/or Pentium chips. We have contacted Intel to see if they wish to comment.

Source: Digitimes | Image via Intel

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Also a newsflash to Intel. The reason people don't buy an "Atom" PC, is because it most likely is running Android or some other lame operating system that you can't do anything on for work. They don't buy it because its way underpowered. Changing the name isn't going to fix that, as eventually people are going to know once they buy it, then return it.

So in other words, they want to hide the name of the actual cpu in order to trick people into buying one of their underpowered cpu's.

Then we get all these people running around posting their BS about how a tablet is the next PC. When the truth is that it isn't and never will be. Tablets have WAY underpowered cpu's compared to any true desktop or laptop cpu.

Atom processors were a pile of crap. Especailly on netbooks. Really sloppy performance from them. Good they're getting rid of them.

Intel should really consider using decent graphics on those Atom chips instead of renaming the entire lineup. Those garbage Atom-powered Windows 8 tablets can barely handle any type of gaming. They even lag in light games like Jetpack Joyride.

alwaysonacoffebreak said,
You tried to game on an atom based tablet? LOL! Is the Intel Atom still working after that torture?

I think it created a vortex and the entire town where he was playing got suck into it.

glen8 said,
They need to ditch Atom, Celeron and Pentium. Perhaps a new brand name all together

true

all that intel branding is impossible to understand for every non-tech guy. they have a lot of work to do before getting fully understood. but i guess they dont even want to. there are tons of lousy tech products, who would buy them if all understood them well?

Funny, when I think of slow and crap, I tend to think of Celeron before Atom.
Maybe it's time to kill off all these older names and start fresh.

Experts and non-experts alike having been telling Intel this, in some cases directly to their faces, for years now.

Guess they react as slow as an Atom.

I agree with using the power of Celeron or Pentium chips. Although these can't stand to older Core processors (there are many core 2 duo whcih are faster), they are 300x better than the Atom Crap.

And yes, Atom must die.

Shows how people just can't get past a brand name, which is really sad. What a world we live in, where the actual thing that matters (performance) is hidden behind the thing that doesn't (brand).

I care not what they call it - so long as it's a good chip.

ZipZapRap said,
Shows how people just can't get past a brand name, which is really sad. What a world we live in, where the actual thing that matters (performance) is hidden behind the thing that doesn't (brand).

I care not what they call it - so long as it's a good chip.


Lets suppose you don't have a lot of time on your hand, but a good amount of money to spend on something expensive (say $2,000). You have to make a choice between product A and B. Product A is a very respectable brand and is known for top quality, while product B is relatively unknown. All other information about the products are also unknown. Which are you more likely to go for given your limit time on hand?

AWilliams87 said,

Which are you more likely to go for given your limit time on hand?

Absolutely neither. If I'm going to spend 2K on something, I'm going to MAKE time to find out the differences between my options.
You've alluded to another problem in tech.. people spending lots of money on things they have no clue about, because they're apparently time poor or knowledge poor.

ZipZapRap said,

Absolutely neither. If I'm going to spend 2K on something, I'm going to MAKE time to find out the differences between my options.
You've alluded to another problem in tech.. people spending lots of money on things they have no clue about, because they're apparently time poor or knowledge poor.


But you must realized that it's not feasible to make time to find the best product of all the products you buy; expensive or cheap. People buy some products because of the good results they've had prior. That's where branding comes into play.

AWilliams87 said,

But you must realized that it's not feasible to make time to find the best product of all the products you buy; expensive or cheap. People buy some products because of the good results they've had prior. That's where branding comes into play.

Which is the whole point of my argument; that people are using brand over performance, style over substance. You are justifying it in certain circumstances, whilst I am saying it's not justifiable. We both agree it happens, sure.

Plus, I don't believe in the “I don't have time” scenario. That's cr4p. Everyone has time, even super busy working parents like me. It's about prioritising what you have to do.

ZipZapRap said,

Which is the whole point of my argument; that people are using brand over performance, style over substance. You are justifying it in certain circumstances, whilst I am saying it's not justifiable. We both agree it happens, sure.

Plus, I don't believe in the “I don't have time” scenario. That's cr4p. Everyone has time, even super busy working parents like me. It's about prioritising what you have to do.


So what you're saying is every purchasing decision you make is a carefully thought out one where you're able to look past branding lol?

AWilliams87 said,

So what you're saying is every purchasing decision you make is a carefully thought out one where you're able to look past branding lol?

For me, every tech purchasing decision (yes, even a pendrive) is made upon a preliminary research. I don't buy something I don't know about. I thought this was obvious for tech enthusiasts. I always want the best available option for my needs, not the best available option for the sales guy at Best Buy.

It's not like a pair of socks or something, you can't judge merely by the looks or the packaging. Especially now that EVERY manufacturer has BOTH sh*tty and good products (alright, to be fair, a lot of them don't have good ones at all). So now branding doesn't matter - at all. You just can't say hey, this was made by manufacturer X (or is part of brand X), so it's 100% to be either awesome or garbage (just look at the decline of Linksys and the rise of TP-Link). It's specs, benchmarks and actual reviews that matter. This is an ever-changing market with ever-changing products.

What's so ridiculous about this? For me it's ridiculous that you don't do the same. In fact, choosing your products merely by looking at their brands makes you look like an ignorant grandpa desperately trying to buy a "cool" cell phone to his grandchild.

Time is a very lame excuse. It's not like you buy a gadget every day. And anyway, is RMAing your stuff after the disappointment of not getting what you expected (by "brand") so much better spent? I don't think so...

Edited by bviktor, Jul 19 2013, 2:15am :

AWilliams87 said,

So what you're saying is every purchasing decision you make is a carefully thought out one where you're able to look past branding lol?

I'm not sure how that's hard to believe? Some of us use the grey matter we're born with to make informed decisions? There are pros and cons to everything, and it's up to the user to decide what compromises they're willing to live with.. my point is a lot people don't even think about that, they just buy based on brand (guy next to me at work refuses to buy any tech that isn't Samsung, because he's Korean...)

bviktor said,

For me, every tech purchasing decision (yes, even a pendrive) is made upon a preliminary research. I don't buy something I don't know about. I thought this was obvious for tech enthusiasts. I always want the best available option for my needs, not the best available option for the sales guy at Best Buy.

It's not like a pair of socks or something, you can't judge merely by the looks or the packaging. Especially now that EVERY manufacturer has BOTH sh*tty and good products (alright, to be fair, a lot of them don't have good ones at all). So now branding doesn't matter - at all. You just can't say hey, this was made by manufacturer X (or is part of brand X), so it's 100% to be either awesome or garbage (just look at the decline of Linksys and the rise of TP-Link). It's specs, benchmarks and actual reviews that matter. This is an ever-changing market with ever-changing products.

What's so ridiculous about this? For me it's ridiculous that you don't do the same. In fact, choosing your products merely by looking at their brands makes you look like an ignorant grandpa desperately trying to buy a "cool" cell phone to his grandchild.

Time is a very lame excuse. It's not like you buy a gadget every day. And anyway, is RMAing your stuff after the disappointment of not getting what you expected (by "brand") so much better spent? I don't think so...


I never mentioned a tech purchase. I used two hypothetical products in my example to ZipZap as too avoid such classifications; nor did I advocate or imply purchasing something "merely by looking at their brands." If you read about, I said "likely to go" for, which is probabilistic statement of giving greater weigh too or attributing a higher chance of. I also never used the word ridiculous nor criticized him for making his purchasing based on due diligence. What I'm implying is that it's hard to believe he engages in due diligence in every purchase. You've intentionally misrepresented my position as to make it easier for you to refute. Thus, your entire 3rd paragraph doesn't apply to me. Finally, why are you coming at me so aggressive with your name calling? I'm sure we can keep these discussions civilized.

Now too your example of the socks: obviously if branding can't be measured, then it isn't applicable to our discussion. But you must see that they're many times where either one doesn't have or aren't willing to allocate time for due diligence in their purchasing decisions. It's much cheaper, it terms of time and effort, to select based mostly by branding; to give it, at least, higher priority in your decision. I am very confident that everyone makes some decisions based on branding whether they're consciously aware they're doing so or not. And that includes ZipZap.

I can think of countless of examples where one wouldn't care much about an item so much and to select because they recognized the brand some place.

Edited by AWilliams87, Jul 19 2013, 3:44am :

ZipZapRap said,

I'm not sure how that's hard to believe? Some of us use the grey matter we're born with to make informed decisions? There are pros and cons to everything, and it's up to the user to decide what compromises they're willing to live with.. my point is a lot people don't even think about that, they just buy based on brand (guy next to me at work refuses to buy any tech that isn't Samsung, because he's Korean...)

A lot of people don't think about stuff that we tech enthusiasts don't look at because they simply don't have the knowledge and really don't care to learn what any of it means because it really doesn't matter to them. They know what works best for them. They look at what really matters to them. Does it have these features I need to use? How does the keyboard feel when I use it? Can it get me through a full cross country flight on a charge? Does it have good speakers? Is the screen decent? And can I get what I need for a reasonable price? They don't always care about specs. It always baffles me how tech enthusiasts don't understand that specs don't mean everything to everyone. Not everyone needs a Core i7-3700K with 16GB of 2133 MHz DDR3 RAM and an Nvidia 760GTX. Not everyone knows what the "K" is for, and not everyone knows what overclocking is. Not everyone needs to know this. This is where brand perception comes into play. They've used it. They know how well it's worked for them in the past. They know that they get a great value for what they need with that brand. They know that other brands don't work as well for them. This is why brand perception exists.

bviktor said,

For me, every tech purchasing decision (yes, even a pendrive) is made upon a preliminary research. I don't buy something I don't know about. I thought this was obvious for tech enthusiasts.

I fully agree. Everything else is just a big chance to waste money in the sea of poor tech products.

Anthony S said,
A lot of people don't think about stuff that we tech enthusiasts don't look at because they simply don't have the knowledge and really don't care to learn what any of it means because it really doesn't matter to them. They know what works best for them. They look at what really matters to them. Does it have these features I need to use? How does the keyboard feel when I use it? Can it get me through a full cross country flight on a charge? Does it have good speakers? Is the screen decent? And can I get what I need for a reasonable price? They don't always care about specs. It always baffles me how tech enthusiasts don't understand that specs don't mean everything to everyone. Not everyone needs a Core i7-3700K with 16GB of 2133 MHz DDR3 RAM and an Nvidia 760GTX. Not everyone knows what the "K" is for, and not everyone knows what overclocking is. Not everyone needs to know this. This is where brand perception comes into play. They've used it. They know how well it's worked for them in the past. They know that they get a great value for what they need with that brand. They know that other brands don't work as well for them. This is why brand perception exists.

I don't know why you think or presume that I believe everyone has to weigh up the hardcore details you mentioned. In your own comment you basically said exactly what I've been trying to say.. questions like "what does this keyboard feel like" etc are valid questions and brand independent. They're good questions

People don't care for tech just as many of us don't give a damn about sowing machines, flowers and will buy a flower cause it looks pretty or buy a sowing machine cause of brand name.

But replacing it with Pentium or Celeron?
Both of those also have a link to 'old' and 'slow'
I hope they come up with something new.

Celeron has always had that image but to this day the name Pentium means quality to many people. It's why they revived it. Plus the new Pentiums that are out right now are awesome for the price.

Thrackerzod said,
Celeron has always had that image but to this day the name Pentium means quality to many people. It's why they revived it. Plus the new Pentiums that are out right now are awesome for the price.

After P 4 I cant see why people combine a Pentium with quality.

All I mean is, that I think they should come up with a new name for their new and improved mobile platform.

To me Pentium just sounds old. I admit that I haven't looked at any of the new Pentiums. I just remember having a Pentium and that was many many PC's ago

Thrackerzod said,
Celeron has always had that image but to this day the name Pentium means quality to many people..

Not really since Pentinum 4. This was the period AMD was better than Intel so don't think many people would associate that with high quality.

LaP said,

Not really since Pentinum 4. This was the period AMD was better than Intel so don't think many people would associate that with high quality.

That is wholly dependent on who you talk to. Both AMD and Pentiums had areas they left the other in the dust.

I wasn't really referring to tech saavy people. I've noticed the general public who doesn't know a Pentium 4 from a 6502 generally thinks of the name Pentium as the good processor vs Celeron or whatever. To me Core was never a very good or marketable name. It's all about branding and for many years you couldn't get through one commercial break without seeing Pentium ads.

You're right though that the Pentium 4 really hurt the brand. Coming out with a new processor that was slower than the previous ones while requiring expensive new proprietary RAM; what Intel was thinking there? They got better over time and went back to SDRAM but the damage was done.

Edited by Bonfire, Jul 19 2013, 3:03pm :

Yeah don't think anyone would be surprised by this, the current gen of atoms is going great guns on the Windows 8 tablets and baytrail is going to be even better. Doesn't deserve to be tarnished by the atoms of earlier years.

Not to mention when I hear Pentium and Celeron. I think they should just simplify those three brands and call them all Core Mobile, Core Micro, or something similar. The Core brand has a much stronger brand perception than both Pentium and Celeron.

Anthony S said,
Not to mention when I hear Pentium and Celeron. I think they should just simplify those three brands and call them all Core Mobile, Core Micro, or something similar. The Core brand has a much stronger brand perception than both Pentium and Celeron.

By doing that, they'd risk impacting on the whole Core brand if one part got a bad reputation.