Safari 5.1.1

At one time, web browsers simply got you to the Internet. But from the day it was released, Safari set the bar higher for web browsers. It introduced sophisticated design elements that made browsing a joy. Easy to use, Safari stayed out of your way and let you effortlessly navigate from site to site.

More browsing space: Safari is designed to emphasize the browsing, not the browser. The browser frame is a single pixel wide. You see a scroll bar only when needed. By default, there's no status bar. Instead, a progress indicator turns as your page loads. You'll find tabs at the very top of the browser, opening an even wider window for viewing websites. A great browser, Safari lets you simply enjoy the web.

Find the sites you need: Looking for a site you visited in the past but can't quite remember? Use Full History Search to quickly find sites using even the sketchiest search terms. And when you click a web page in Cover Flow, it's because you've already recognized it as the site you were looking for. No more guessing. Innovative features like these show you how good browsing can be.

Satisfy your need for speed: The world's fastest browser, Safari has speed to burn. Why should you wait for pages to load? You want to see those search results, get the latest news, check current stock prices, right now.

Changelog:

  • Address issues that could cause hangs and excessive memory usage
  • Improve stability when using Find, dragging tabs, and managing extensions
  • Improve stability for netflix.com and other websites that use the Silverlight plug-in
  • Improve stability when zooming on Google maps
  • Address an issue that could prevent East Asian character input into webpages with Flash content
  • Address an issue that could cause History items to appear incorrectly
  • Address an issue that could cause cleared Reading List items to appear
  • Improve printing from Safari
  • Address an issue that could prevent the Google Safe Browsing Service from updating

Download: Safari 5.1.1 | 36.5 MB (Freeware)
View: Safari Website @ Apple

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18 Comments

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How bad is the developer staff at Apple? They borrow Webkit and than place on of the advance features into the Lion only version (i.e. need the OS) to have sandboxing, transparent downloading pop ups and html5 Canvas acceleration. They can't even support full screen browsing on Windows? These are some really basic elements of web browsing.

Honestly though, who uses Safari on Windows? I think they would be much better off if they just killed the project for Windows all together. They have enough of a problem just competing with Google Chrome, who even with a lesser Webkit spec... offers a much more robust, and superior product (even on the Mac).

It looks like it's amateur hour once again at Apple.

azure.sapphire said,
How bad is the developer staff at Apple? They borrow Webkit...

*Ahem*

"WebKit was originally derived by Apple Inc. from the Konqueror browser's KHTML software library for use as the engine of Safari web browser, and has now been further developed by individuals from KDE, Apple Inc., Nokia, Google, Bitstream, Torch Mobile, Samsung, Igalia, and others"

"The WebKit project was started within Apple by Don Melton on 25 June 2001[5] as a fork of KHTML and KJS."

"On June 7, 2005, Safari developer Dave Hyatt announced on his weblog that Apple was open-sourcing WebKit (previously, only WebCore and JavaScriptCore were open source) and opening up access to WebKit's CVS tree and the bug Database tool.[13] This was announced at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference 2005 by Apple Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Bertrand Serlet."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebKit

Stetson said,

*Ahem*

"WebKit was originally derived by Apple Inc. from the Konqueror browser's KHTML software library for use as the engine of Safari web browser, and has now been further developed by individuals from KDE, Apple Inc., Nokia, Google, Bitstream, Torch Mobile, Samsung, Igalia, and others"

"The WebKit project was started within Apple by Don Melton on 25 June 2001[5] as a fork of KHTML and KJS."

"On June 7, 2005, Safari developer Dave Hyatt announced on his weblog that Apple was open-sourcing WebKit (previously, only WebCore and JavaScriptCore were open source) and opening up access to WebKit's CVS tree and the bug Database tool.[13] This was announced at Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference 2005 by Apple Senior Vice President of Software Engineering Bertrand Serlet."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WebKit

I put it another way. Why is it that Google can take Webkit, and actually make a usable browser with the same source (and their own inclusions)? As for my reference to Apple borrowing Webkit... I meant KHTML and KJS.

Sorry Steven, but sophistication and joy are very subjective terms.

I don't class the stealth install of Safari onto Windows machines when all I want to do is update iTunes to be very sophisticated or joyous.

TCLN Ryster said,
Sorry Steven, but sophistication and joy are very subjective terms.

I don't class the stealth install of Safari onto Windows machines when all I want to do is update iTunes to be very sophisticated or joyous.


When I update iTunes I always deselect Safari from installing

Mohitster said,
Pardon my ignorance, why is it called "boilerplate" text? What is a boilerplate?
Looking at the definition, it seems to be a sort of template to copy from, or a 'stamp' of sorts.

1. a steel plate used in making the shells of steam boilers.
2. a copy made with the intention of making other copies from it
3. a set of instructions incorporated in several places in a computer program or a standard form of words used repeatedly in drafting contracts, guarantees, etc.

TCLN Ryster said,
Sorry Steven, but sophistication and joy are very subjective terms.

I don't class the stealth install of Safari onto Windows machines when all I want to do is update iTunes to be very sophisticated or joyous.


Stealth?

It's no more "stealth" than updating Windows Live Mail when all you want is to install Windows Live Messenger via the Windows Live Installer. It's right there, spelled out clearly, with a checkbox next to it for you to choose. Only stealthy if you happen to be blind.

Neobond said,

When I update iTunes I always deselect Safari from installing

The point is that it should be opt-in, not opt-out. Personally I un-tick it too, and even hide it altogether. But I've worked on many PCs that have Safari installed, and when I've asked the owner whether they want it or not, they usually say "no idea what that is, I didn't install it".... Clearly if the average user sees a popup saying that there's a new version of iTunes and asks them to update to it, they're just going to click the Install button without noticing what is ticked and what isn't.

Northgrove said,

It's no more "stealth" than updating Windows Live Mail when all you want is to install Windows Live Messenger via the Windows Live Installer

Sorry, but you're flat out wrong. Windows Live Mail is a component of Windows Live. When you go to the Windows Live webpage, you know what you are getting because it is clearly spelled out. Last time I checked, Safari was not a component of iTunes. The iTunes software update should not be trying to sneak software that is unrelated to the product you installed onto your machine.

They bundle the Safari checkbox into an iTunes update message, hoping that a lot of people wont notice the checkbox before they click the Install button. It's deceitful, and by that same token, stealthy.

dknm said,
And yet yahoo mail and others cause Safari to shoot double rainbows.
tsk tsk

It's your Mac's way of telling it wants you to switch to iCloud.