Some HTML5 websites updated to work on Windows Phone 8

You may remember that Microsoft has been working with a number of companies over the past few months to optimize websites to work with the touch screen features of Internet Explorer 10 in Windows 8. Today, the company announced it has extended that work to make some HTML5-based sites work better on IE10 on Windows Phone 8.

The official IE blog has the details on these new features. One of them is for the news site Pulse, which was optimized for IE10 for Windows 8 earlier this year. You may also remember that Pulse decided to remove its previously released Windows Phone app from the download store at the same time.

Today, the Pulse site has now been updated to work well with IE10 in Windows Phone 8. Microsoft states:

The updated site is completely adaptive and built using responsive design best practices. As we updated the site, we also optimized for performance, so that difficult animations or transitions have been selectively disabled or swapped for mobile friendly equivalents.

The blog post adds that the Pulse site has also been updated to work well when viewed from the Xbox 360 game console, "including optimizations to the site’s color, contrast and layout."

Microsoft and Atari got together earlier this summer to launch an HTML5 website that replicated classic Atari games for free via HTML5. Today, that same site has been updated for Windows Phone 8 IE10 viewing. Microsoft says, " ... four of the original games you know and love – Pong, Missile Command, Asteroids and Super Breakout – have been updated to really light up on a smaller screen."

Source: IE blog | Image via Microsoft

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This is excellent! It's sad how they have to do this, but I'm glad they are. Web developers need to realize that IE10 is better (if not just as good) as the other browsers, and developers need to stick to web standard coding instead of coding that won't render on all standard-compliant browsers.

j2006 said,
This is excellent! It's sad how they have to do this, but I'm glad they are. Web developers need to realize that IE10 is better (if not just as good) as the other browsers, and developers need to stick to web standard coding instead of coding that won't render on all standard-compliant browsers.

No, what you're going to see is a new breed of standards proponents. When IE6 compatibility was king, the cry was for the next generation of web development to prioritize standards uber alles. HTML5 was a magical, holy word, symbolizing the hopes and dreams of coders everywhere.

Then things started to change. IE6 is essentially dead, but rather than free them to code to standards, they've suddenly realized that they still have to test against actual browsers.

Now there's this bizarre rallying cry, not to code sites to an HTML standard, but to build browsers around a rendering standard: webkit. People everywhere have suddenly decided that they do, in fact, want one browser to rule them all--and competitors are all expected to be happy releasing nothing more than repackagings of that same engine. Then, web developers won't have to care about standards, they won't have to care about anything but building a website that works in Chrome, and they've somehow managed, at the same time, to dress it up in an 'open, standards-based' guise, despite it being fundamentally the same as standardizing around any other rendering engine.

Joshie said,
Now there's this bizarre rallying cry, not to code sites to an HTML standard, but to build browsers around a rendering standard: webkit. People everywhere have suddenly decided that they do, in fact, want one browser to rule them all--and competitors are all expected to be happy releasing nothing more than repackagings of that same engine. Then, web developers won't have to care about standards, they won't have to care about anything but building a website that works in Chrome, and they've somehow managed, at the same time, to dress it up in an 'open, standards-based' guise, despite it being fundamentally the same as standardizing around any other rendering engine.

I don't understand why the hell did webkit become a sort of standard. What happened to free web and open web coding?

Google/Chrome have become the MS/IE6 of the old. Arrogant, intrusive and no respect for standards.

eddman said,

I don't understand why the hell did webkit become a sort of standard. What happened to free web and open web coding?

Google/Chrome have become the MS/IE6 of the old. Arrogant, intrusive and no respect for standards.

Agreed, In an attempt to make a better web, they have become IE6 in the process.

Sure Webkit works for now, but so did IE6 back in its day, then look what happened.

eddman said,

I don't understand why the hell did webkit become a sort of standard. What happened to free web and open web coding?

Google/Chrome have become the MS/IE6 of the old. Arrogant, intrusive and no respect for standards.


Many people don't question it because so much of the code is open source. At least, that's the justification people will give. It's totally hollow, though--Gecko never had this degree of worship.

No, it's something more visceral, I think. It was about standards when IE was awful about standards. As IE improved dramatically, standards suddenly became less important. People aren't taking the evidence and forming opinions: they're taking their opinions and searching for evidence to justify them. Once the old evidence no longer works, it has to be trivialized. That's what happened to standards, and the elevation of the engine's importance was the necessary reflex to keep the original opinion sound.