The IPcalypse is just over a week away

Back in November last year, we wrote that the "IPCalypse" is only 100 days away. At the time, this seemed like a long time, but the IPcalypse is coming early, with current estimates that IPv4 addressing will run out in the next 9 days.

As of writing, Hurricane Electric reports that a mere 33 million addresses are unallocated, which equates to about 2% of overall IPv4 addresses that were ever available. Neowin will be covering the effects of the IP exhaustion later this week.

IPv6 was developed to supercede IPv4 -- which was originally released in 1981 -- and was finalised in 1998, over 12 years ago, but rapid adoption was never seen, and the protocol is still not used widely. This may change shortly, it is likely there will be rapid adoption of IPv6 as newer organizations have issues obtaining the older addresses.

Some large organizations will be performing tests of IPv6 in the near future, with World IPv6 day coming up on 8 June -- even though this date is after the IPv4 exhaustion date -- where companies such as Google, Facebook and Cisco (amongst others) will be using IPv6 for 24 hours.

The IPcalypse is only 9 days away....

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"but rapid adoption was never seen, and the protocol is still not used widely. This may change shortly" -- Probably not, since it will cost money. lol

IntelliMoo said,
"but rapid adoption was never seen, and the protocol is still not used widely. This may change shortly" -- Probably not, since it will cost money. lol

True My ISP still does not support IPv6 and they are not planning to start using it.. xD

TrOjAn. said,

True My ISP still does not support IPv6 and they are not planning to start using it.. xD


i keep askin Virgin media (UK ISP) and keep getting told we'll get back to you when more info is available. grr

My ISP just said that they are not planning yet to invest into IPv6. They make tons of money every year while they do not offer proper internet connection to their customers. That's all because of the duopoly of two ISP's in Belgium; not enough competition :-/

tiagosilva29 said,
THE END IS COMING! REPENT!

Then stop playing with it then.....

It will be very interesting indeed to see how my ISP handles this (not that I use their DNS anyways ) but If they try and up the prices we already pay then I think the Shat will hit the fan for them

tiagosilva29 said,
THE END IS COMING! REPENT!

Pretty sad if your life is coming to an end when you don't have internet anymore....sigh

sbdb said,

Pretty sad if your life is coming to an end when you don't have internet anymore....sigh

Not like the internet is going to suddenly disappear when we run out of IPv4 addresses, you know. If you ask me, all those "THE END IS COMING" posts are people making a rather lousy joke, but whatever.

TRC said,
They've been fear mongering about this for years now.

yes and i would usually agree w/ you, but it's actually serious this time. the average user will not notice any change and life will go on as normal, but 2011-2012 are finally the years to get switched to dual stack, but not native IPv6.

Jdawg683 said,

yes and i would usually agree w/ you, but it's actually serious this time. the average user will not notice any change and life will go on as normal, but 2011-2012 are finally the years to get switched to dual stack, but not native IPv6.

It will start to get serious to the point where you won't be able to ignore it anymore at the point where RIR's will run out of /24 block allocations (visible at HE.NET info page mentioned above if you click "RIR" tab) - and new servers will be assigned IPv6 only... to reach these resources you will *have to* establish a tunnel to IPv6 only space via IPv4 "legacy" internet. More and more such resources will appear, and that should ideally move people toward wider awareness about IPv6 and migration paths to it.

The *real* IPcalypse will start when RIR's will start running out of /24 blocks, not when RIR's will complete allocating IPv4 addresses.
ARIN and RIPE have both about 10% left, APNIC has 5% (but IPv6 is much wider adopted in China, Japan and South Korea), and LACNIC and AfriNIC have lots of time to ponder this (30+ and 60+ % correspondingly).

I personally can't wait for IPv6. It will be fun. BT Home Hubs and HP printers already support IPv6, my Windows 7 PC's do so, too.

Educated Idiot said,
So hurry up and standardize IPv6 so we can have an easy transition and get on with our lives.
IPv6 has been standardised since 1998.

Intrinsica said,
IPv6 has been standardised since 1998.

Yup.
However it underwent LOTS of modifications, including Address Space allocation, so if you read about it a few years ago, it's time for refresher, for sure... (as I have found recently when having one myself...)

Someone confirm my understanding of this, please. Basically, there's only so many numbers you can create with so many digits, and those numbers are about to run out. So we're simply just adding on more digits? Really doesn't seem all that big an issue, we'll just have to tell our tech to look at something a few digits longer to find new stuff, while everything already assigned it's normal amount of digits is still operational. Right?

smartin0115 said,
Someone confirm my understanding of this, please. Basically, there's only so many numbers you can create with so many digits, and those numbers are about to run out. So we're simply just adding on more digits? Really doesn't seem all that big an issue, we'll just have to tell our tech to look at something a few digits longer to find new stuff, while everything already assigned it's normal amount of digits is still operational. Right?

Have you seen an IPv6 address? See the difference is in 32 versus 128 bits, so technically speaking... it's not just a few digits. Not like it matters anyway, as I don't recall the last time I called my ISP and had to provide an IP address for them to check stuff. Life will go on and the average Joe will most likely not notice any difference.

Metodi Mitov said,

Have you seen an IPv6 address? See the difference is in 32 versus 128 bits, so technically speaking... it's not just a few digits. Not like it matters anyway, as I don't recall the last time I called my ISP and had to provide an IP address for them to check stuff. Life will go on and the average Joe will most likely not notice any difference.

No, I hadn't, but thanks for affirming the suspicion.

jwelsh405 said,
You better hide your computer, hide your laptop, hide your iPad cuz ipv4 is raping everybody

Errm you know most home networks NAT everything out of a single IPv4 address anyway?
As do most Public WI-FI hotspots.

Unless these devices are connecting directly to the ISP they probably don't have an internet routable IP anyway.

Not sure about the US but most of the UK mobile networks MASS NAT phones anyway.

Meph said,
How will ISPs give new customers an internet connection?

Most ISPs have a decent lot of IPv4 addresses that they don't use anyway. Still, even if some ISP did run out of addresses and is too stubborn to make the switch to IPv6, they can always NAT their less tech-savvy customers and end up losing their more experienced ones that actually have things running that do require they have a real IP.

It's not really something to worry about. The stacks will run parallel for a while and then it'll just be IPv6 on the WAN, but in LAN IPv4 works just fine no reason throwing that out.

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