Thunderbird 2.0.0.21

Simple to use, powerful, and customizable, Thunderbird is a full-featured email application. Thunderbird supports IMAP and POP mail protocols, as well as HTML mail formatting. Easily import your existing email accounts and messages. Built-in RSS capabilities, powerful quick search, spell check as you type, global inbox, deleting attachments and advanced message filtering round out Thunderbird's modern feature set.

Download: Mozilla Thunderbird 2.0.0.21
View: Release Notes
Link: Home Page

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19 Comments

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bush said,
Thunderbird 2 feels like a worn-out whore Enough with the 2.

If you think Thunderbird is old, what do you feel about Pegasus http://www.pmail.com/. Back then for windows environment, you had Microsoft, Eudora, and Pegasus as the top 3 popular.

I previously used Thunderbird but switched to Outlook because I bought into the "Ultimate Steal" program. Only uses 22megs.. never realized how much more memory Thunderbird took I guess.

My thunderbird uses 14 extensions and it uses around 55MB but where you got the 370MB figure from is beyond me john0877. Email clients are handy as you can change the look and style of the app to your likeing unlike web based email which does not and it is a pain to have to sign in the many sites when you can have a mail client do it and can manage more than 1 account.sorlag: thats why they call it beta and thats why i don't use beta versions of many apps.

Thunderbird is really nice... love it.
But... stay away from ealy versions of Thunderbird 3.
Im using a early build which autoupdates every x days and since a few builds, Thunderbird stays executed and needs to be killed with taskmanager every time.

I hope they fix it soon...

Now if only you could control your own computer or whatever it is that is actually causing the problem. I have 18 extensions, and Thunderbird is using 71 MB RAM. I've never seen it go much above 100 MB, and I've been using it since 1.0.

Yochanan said,
Now if only you could control your own computer or whatever it is that is actually causing the problem. I have 18 extensions, and Thunderbird is using 71 MB RAM. I've never seen it go much above 100 MB, and I've been using it since 1.0.

He said it a little harsh maybe, but I'm running 13 add-ons (apparently :P thought it was less) here, got 3 accounts set-up and when minimized to the systray TB takes up 33.5 MB of RAM?

yeah i dunno whats up with it but i had like 6 accounts set up and using i think 2 extensions. a world time one and maybe something else. i used to have the webmail addons cause of hotmail but since they went to POP i took them all out.

standalone clients are better for checking multiple accounts at a time. i dont know about you but i dont like signing in to 3-4 different websites for the email only to find none there. so this way the program runs int he background and checks them all in one convenient place.

now if only thunderbird will tackle the memory leak or whatever it is that allows it to sit idle, minimized and use upwards of 370mb of the ram. i know some are gonna say who cares cause they have 4,6, or 8gb ram but i say thats not the point cause no program should be sitting idle and using that much ram regardless of how much you have. when they tackle that and get their programs, yes firefox included, using way less than they do now maybe i will consider using them again.

It's nice for what it is, but how many people still use standalone mail clients? It's kind of like developing a new gopher client at this point.

TRC said,
It's nice for what it is, but how many people still use standalone mail clients? It's kind of like developing a new gopher client at this point.

I guess it depends on what you wish to do; I used to find that the google mail box was really constrained and slow but since its improvements I have basically gotten rid of mail.app in favour of online client.

Why do most people still use stand alone mail clients? its because that is what they are used to - they've always used it and in the most part ISP's encourage people to use them when accessing their ISP mail. With that being said, however, those who do sign up for an account at the local ISP I tend to suggest they have non-ISP based email account so that if you move to another ISP you can keep the same email address.

I do... I've just never been partial to web-based e-mail, especially since Charter lost everone's e-mail that was on their web server last year. (And liked gopher... I can only imagine how cool new clients for it would be. :))

TRC said,
It's nice for what it is, but how many people still use standalone mail clients? It's kind of like developing a new gopher client at this point.

Actually everyone with a PC I know

I tend to use web based mail as a backup to client mail. I like the speed of a client, the notification ability, i also like opening a spotlight and doing a search across the whole computer, images, emails, docs etc..

TRC said,
It's nice for what it is, but how many people still use standalone mail clients? It's kind of like developing a new gopher client at this point.


AT&T, one of the largest US ISPs, offers E-mail in either Webmail via Yahoo or POP.

Since I've been a customer of my baby bell since 1999, (bought by AT&T in 2004) I already have the vast majority of my E-mail downloaded via POP so it only make sense to continue using a POP client, in my case Thunderbird.

TRC said,
It's nice for what it is, but how many people still use standalone mail clients? It's kind of like developing a new gopher client at this point.

I agree that there is a move to web, and I did use thunderbird, before I decided to let google do it for me. There is still need off e-mail clients, and Thunderbird is a very nice open source alternative.