Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx released

Ubuntu 10.04

Just a little over a month after the first beta was released, Canonical has officially let loose the latest version of its popular Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu 10.04, also known as Lucid Lynx, has been a highly anticipated release within the Linux community.

The new version of the OS features much welcomed cosmetic changes, as well as some notable new features. The new theme takes on a darker, brown-less, Mac OS style look. By default, the window buttons are on the left side. However, this can be changed by the user. Feature wise, Lucid Lync brings a faster, more social experience to the user. With improved boot-up time and a new "Me" menu powered by Gwibber, and a built in video editing program, Ubuntu is sure to win over a lot of Linux fans.

Next up for Canonical is Ubuntu 10.10, Maverick Meerkat. For a small peek at some of the things we may see in the next release, visit our previous coverage regarding Ubuntu killing off their OS's notification area.

For those who aren't full-on, hardcore Linux users but would like to try it out alongside Windows, Canonical provides a program called Wubi. This nifty little application will allow you to create a dual booting system from within Windows.

To download Lucid Lynx, visit Ubuntu's download page. To view the release notes, go here.

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Cool, might give this a go I tried the beta version but only used it for 5 minutes as it was a slide show on VirtualBox, hopefully this version works better (9.10 runs great in Vbox).

Xtreme2damax said,
Any new screen savers? I really miss the jumping cows on trampoline's screen saver back from Breezy Badger.

The best "screensaver" I've seen was making the Compiz cube spin Haven't tried it myself.

Syanide said,

The best "screensaver" I've seen was making the Compiz cube spin Haven't tried it myself.

I've been using Compiz for a few years now (since it came out), and honestly, you get sick of the cube spinning and wobbly windows after 5 minutes. Don't get me wrong, Compiz has some very useful effects, ones I've come to rely on at work, but most of the ones you see in the demo videos are completely useless.

currently using 9.10 ubuntu, which i dual boot with win7. generally it has been ok. my only real gripe for the os is no hardware acceleration for h264 MKVs and no full support for most windows games (under wine). if these 2 weren't an issue, i'd jump to linux all the way. regardless, i still use this and other distros for other tasks (especially network-related stuff). will try this one and see how it goes.

jsilophi said,
no hardware acceleration for h264 MKVs

If you have an nvidia card there's VDPAU which provides hardware decoding. MPlayer, ffmpeg and xine at the least all support it.

Downloaded 10.4 AMD 64bit, booted, test, installed with wubi side by side with Windows 7 x64. Best of both worlds now

SK[ said,]I am using the RC version. Do I need to download the ISO or will update manager update me?

Update manager will do the trick.

87% done getting Xubuntu 10.04

Edited by cork1958, Apr 30 2010, 11:57am :

Ubuntu 10.04 Netbook Remix + Acer Aspire One 532h = Epic trackpad FAIL!
Touch the trackpad and the pointer just randomly moves all over the place.

Quite impressed with the level of development on Ubuntu over the years, this latest version looks great can't wait to try it out. Its now very much becoming a more serious rival to the traditional Windows and Mac operating systems.

To move the window buttons you have to right click on the desktop and choose "Change Desktop Background" and there is a tab for Theme, you should find right side button themes in there you can change to.

I don't care for Ubuntu on its own, I'm waiting for Linux Mint 9. Its based on Ubuntu Lucid Lynx but it adds stuff not included with Ubuntu that are very handy and makes Linux even better to use out of the box (plus won't come with windows buttons on the left by default).

Prt Scr said,
And thats one of the reasons Linux will always lag behind MS etc, the linux world needs to realise that users will have to pay for licenses for things like mp3
Full stop!

A user does NOT have to pay to license MP3 encoding or playback.
http://mp3licensing.com/help/index.html#4

Prt Scr said,
In the past i have bought and used distros which cost money, and which included multimedia working out of the box. Anyone who baulks at paying a small fee for their linux so it will include this support out of the box is just holding the cause back.
I have paid for Linux installation products (Red Hat 5.1 was my first foray into Linux, and it was an in-store purchase). I have paid for Linux included with books from Barnes & Noble or other bookstores. I have also likewise supported financially with other purchases, books mostly, because they are so useful. Also purchased Unreal Tournament 2004 because they included a Linux installer right on their CD and labeled their box with the Tux logo and included system specs for running in linux.

Yet, I must be real dense here, because I don't see how users not wanting to pay for MP3 licensing (which, as I have pointed out, is not needed) is holding the cause back.

The only "cause" that created Linux was the support of doing something useful using free software. Free as in "freedom", as promoted by the FSF, and spelled out in the GPL that Linux is distributed under. And NOTHING in that cause is helped or hindered by payments. They are permitted, but the requirement is for sharing the code changes you make back to the community. [u]That[/u] is the payment that keeps Linux going. Not giving money to parties that keep their code locked and algorithms forbidden unless you hand over some scratch.

This educational moment provided by the letters G, N and U, and delivered by another computing old-timer (yeah, the old acoustic modems you had to stuff a phone into and make a good seal with the foam cups).

markjensen said,
Full stop!

A user does NOT have to pay to license MP3 encoding or playback.
http://mp3licensing.com/help/index.html#4

I have paid for Linux installation products (Red Hat 5.1 was my first foray into Linux, and it was an in-store purchase). I have paid for Linux included with books from Barnes & Noble or other bookstores. I have also likewise supported financially with other purchases, books mostly, because they are so useful. Also purchased Unreal Tournament 2004 because they included a Linux installer right on their CD and labeled their box with the Tux logo and included system specs for running in linux.

Yet, I must be real dense here, because I don't see how users not wanting to pay for MP3 licensing (which, as I have pointed out, is not needed) is holding the cause back.

The only "cause" that created Linux was the support of doing something useful using free software. Free as in "freedom", as promoted by the FSF, and spelled out in the GPL that Linux is distributed under. And NOTHING in that cause is helped or hindered by payments. They are permitted, but the requirement is for sharing the code changes you make back to the community. [u]That[/u] is the payment that keeps Linux going. Not giving money to parties that keep their code locked and algorithms forbidden unless you hand over some scratch.

This educational moment provided by the letters G, N and U, and delivered by another computing old-timer (yeah, the old acoustic modems you had to stuff a phone into and make a good seal with the foam cups).

Yes it would be ideal to keep it all FREE, but then theres the point im trying to make about usability and advancing Linux on the desktop. A lot of the linux world will keep belligerently trying to keep the tie dyed hippie free software ideal until the death....the death of Linux every making it on to the mainstream desktop.

They need to wake up and sniff reality, otherwise ill still be typing these messages on a Microsoft OS ten years from now and then another ten years after that......

Companies who charge for closed source intellectual property are within their rights to do so. Personally like ive said, ive been happy in the past to pay for 3rd party software/drivers used in whatever linux i was buying at the time.

Still crap support for IDT audio on HP notebooks, no ATI drivers(probably ATI's fault), but overall a nice release visually. Disappointed though with poor support for the IDT though, recompiling drivers every time it updates isnt appealing to me.

Just installed this with Wubi to give it a shot after being pulled back to Windows. I do have to say it "looks" amazing. The UI overhaul was a well needed change from the classic Gnome. I mean everything they did you could do yourself with patience, but the fact that it looks pleasing to the eyes out of the box is amazing. Graphics card support, wireless support, all out of the box, I'm feeling the tug, return to Linux....if only WoW worked smoothly, I'm about to experiment with that, got my Windows partition mounted so I'll see how different things run in wine. And this is an LTS edition, so that pleases me, :-)

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