Windows 8.1 build 9369 installation screenshots

Windows 8.1, build 9364, hit the web this afternoon and we have compiled the screenshots from the installation of the OS for your viewing pleasure. 

The installation, as you would expect, is very similar to that of Windows 8 and the retail update may have have a few more changes and features not exhibited in the build. Beyond that, not much, if anything, has changed from the previous leak of Windows 8.1.

Source: Goput.it

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Half assed $hit these clowns are coming up with! That old bald dude needs to step down. Replace his ass with a young, talented, opened-minded lad.

JHBrown said,
Half assed $hit these clowns are coming up with! That old bald dude needs to step down. Replace his ass with a young, talented, opened-minded lad.

People seem to ignore the fact that Windows is a absolutely massive OS. You don't see changes go so fast on Linux Distro's even, come on man. OSX is virtually unchanged. Linux relies on Gnome/KDE desktops mainly, which have been the same for decades, and wow Gnome has gotten an upgrade most people hate as well, KDE4 has received tons of hatred...

But no, a few things they cant be assed about like install screens, old control panel etc. That still have left overs from previous OS releases.... THE ABSOLUTE HORROR.

JHBrown said,
Point taken!

The smallest change can break the biggest applications, so Microsoft need to be careful about what they change, not to mention the prolonged time spent on upgrading every little thing, it can be expensive.

zikalify said,
Partition manager still looks like junk

They are using tools that are not broken and is required by Admins in big companies that require things not to break.

Question. What is different about these screenshots compared to RTM? Be damned if I can see one. The installer window even has the same Aero style (sloppy).

Windows in Setup are flattened and grey now (were untouched since Vista Beta (!) before). Maybe they'll make them even more consistent with current style in later builds. Maybe not.

mychaelo said,
Windows in Setup are flattened and grey now (were untouched since Vista Beta (!) before). Maybe they'll make them even more consistent with current style in later builds. Maybe not.

This has probably been left alone for compatibility with how the installer actually works. It's a absolute minor thing and even when you install Windows 8/8.1, you can just refresh your system back to the beginning again to avoid seeing the installer in the first place.

warwagon said,
What is the point of showing it when it looks identical to windows 8?

Warwagon, you've been on Neowin for years and probably followed a lot of releases. This is completely normal.

We had builds that looked like Windows 7 for ages until Microsoft 'unlocked' everything.

If someone didn't post anything people would be like 'Any screenshots?'. It goes both ways unfortunately.

I hope they will redesign the flat and non-rounded window frame for installation to match with official Windows 8 (or 8.1) style. It's really easy for them. I also want them to redraw new icon set as well. These icons are straight from Windows Vista and don't look matching to those app icons on the start screen at all. I think they need to learn more from Office division in designing a more consistent UI. I love Office 2013 UI with their TRULY REDESIGNED flat icons, ribbon, and the animation when we interact with them. With Windows 8's version---not so much.

Edited by Quoc Cao, Apr 16 2013, 9:01pm :

It's not as easy as you think. There was a blog post awhile back if I remember correctly that said that the testing of Windows is very vigorous and even the smallest change can break stuff unexpectly.

The installer hasn't changed much because I believe Microsoft are working on keeping compatibility with previous pre-installation environments like Vista, 7,dual booting, recovery etc. Not to mention it would take a team of people to change things and not break everything else in the process.

People forget that when they put in that DVD/USB pen drive and boot into the installation that it's a staging area for other things as well.

Also, we all know that there are Icons and crap from years ago but again, there was a post that detailed that if they removed a specific icon that a legacy program was designed with (We're talking 3.1 error Icons etc) that the program would quite possibly break which Microsoft are trying to avoid in Enterprise/Corporate companies which handle old programs.

Tony. said,
It's not as easy as you think. There was a blog post awhile back if I remember correctly that said that the testing of Windows is very vigorous and even the smallest change can break stuff unexpectly.

The installer hasn't changed much because I believe Microsoft are working on keeping compatibility with previous pre-installation environments like Vista, 7,dual booting, recovery etc. Not to mention it would take a team of people to change things and not break everything else in the process.

People forget that when they put in that DVD/USB pen drive and boot into the installation that it's a staging area for other things as well.

Also, we all know that there are Icons and crap from years ago but again, there was a post that detailed that if they removed a specific icon that a legacy program was designed with (We're talking 3.1 error Icons etc) that the program would quite possibly break which Microsoft are trying to avoid in Enterprise/Corporate companies which handle old programs.

Thanks for replying!

Remember because you have read posts that could be used to defense Microsoft's design decision doesn't necessarily make it reasonable. Users speak volumes.

I have read all of the posts from Building Windows 8 while back so I know what you mean. However, the problem is that Microsoft doesn't care about the details. My intention is not telling them to overhaul the installer but to tweak the skin of it which in fact they did but not a very good job. When you look at the installation above, notice that the transparent Aero look on the window which was there on Windows Vista, 7 installation is gone.That's a proof that they have tweaked it, and it's possible. Unfortunately, they only did a half job because they didn't change it to square corner. Given that they have made changes on the background, the transparency of the window, and many other visual elements of the installer, do you think they can break things for just making rounded corner of the window square? Personally, I don't think that window is a real flesh window but just a graphic representing a window. Therefore, there's no compatibility or potential usability disasters for making these minimal but necessary changes.

For the icon set, well, I don't need them to completely change the shape, size of the icons to something completely different. What I meant was to FLATTEN it so it would look more consistent to the new UI. Flattening means that you take out from the original icon: the shadow, gradient, glossiness, unnecessary 3D elements, etc. When you look at Office 2013 ribbon, you may see clearly that there's a new look to the ribbon itself as well as the icons. If you have used Office 2007, or 2010, the icons on the new version and the way they work are really much the same just in the different skin. Icons that represent Cut, Paste, Bold, Underline,etc...are really similar to those of the previous Office versions. So if they simplify (or flatten) the icon set, it would not look so different to create confusion but just help increasing the harmony between traditional desktop UI and new Start Screen.

Big concern is that Microsoft knows all of these things, but they don't really care.

Edited by Quoc Cao, Apr 17 2013, 1:47am :

Quoc Cao said,

Thanks for replying!

Remember because you have read posts that could be used to defense Microsoft's design decision doesn't necessarily make it reasonable. Users speak volumes.

I have read all of the posts from Building Windows 8 while back so I know what you mean. However, the problem is that Microsoft doesn't care about the details. My intention is not telling them to overhaul the installer but to tweak the skin of it which in fact they did but not a very good job. When you look at the installation above, notice that the transparent Aero look on the window which was there on Windows Vista, 7 installation is gone.That's a proof that they have tweaked it, and it's possible. Unfortunately, they only did a half job because they didn't change it to square corner. Given that they have made changes on the background, the transparency of the window, and many other visual elements of the installer, do you think they can break things for just making rounded corner of the window square? Personally, I don't think that window is a real flesh window but just a graphic representing a window. Therefore, there's no compatibility or potential usability disasters for making these minimal but necessary changes.

For the icon set, well, I don't need them to completely change the shape, size of the icons to something completely different. What I meant was to FLATTEN it so it would look more consistent to the new UI. Flattening means that you take out from the original icon: the shadow, gradient, glossiness, unnecessary 3D elements, etc. When you look at Office 2013 ribbon, you may see clearly that there's a new look to the ribbon itself as well as the icons. If you have used Office 2007, or 2010, the icons on the new version and the way they work are really much the same just in the different skin. Icons that represent Cut, Paste, Bold, Underline,etc...are really similar to those of the previous Office versions. So if they simplify (or flatten) the icon set, it would not look so different to create confusion but just help increasing the harmony between traditional desktop UI and new Start Screen.

Big concern is that Microsoft knows all of these things, but they don't really care.

OMFG WE NEED SQUARE CORNERZ IN WINDOWS SETUP OMFGZ!!!11111111 I CANT LIVE WITHOUT SQUARE CORNERS IN THE SETUP FFS **** YOU MICROSOFT OMFG **** YOU SO MUCH WHY THE **** DOES SUCH A RETARDED COMPANY EXIST I HOPE THEY GO ****ING BANKRUPT FOR ****S SAKE!!!111111 I CAN'T ****ING EVEN

IntelliMoo said,
ms known for consistency? Come on. :>

Microsoft is not known for consistency but the Office division alone. However, because they're not known for that doesn't mean they shouldn't be.

Nope. You just need to right click and go on "Customise" now.

People were accidentally dragging the tiles when swiping around the Metro UI, so this extra step stops this from happening.

wingliston said,
Bashing the installer now? New level of low? Most admins do not care how the installer looks.

It's a nice testament to the Windows team's continued lack of interest to bring a proper streamlined and consistent interface to its users.

Windows Nashville said,
Windows 7 styled chrome during installation. Windows 7 icons after installation. What a half-baked mess of an "update".

Of course the legacy installer looks... legacy.

If you want a newer looking installer, run the new one!

Update the desktop icons already. Some icons are over 12 years old.

Update the installation windows to Windows 8 style windows.

FFS Microsoft this **** is so simple and easy!

lctb51 said,
Um, the icons are actually from vista, therefore they are really 7 years old. They look absolutely fine!

No.

In Windows 8 theres icons from XP, Vista, 7 (which introduced a few new ones, in a slightly different style from Vista). And theres maybe even a few icons hidden away that are from Windows 95 or 98.

The whole thing is a mess, as each OS had different style icons. And if you think Vista's shiny glossy icons go with Windows 8 flat modern design style, then you need your eyes checked or something.

W32.Backdoor.KillAV.E said,

No.

In Windows 8 theres icons from XP, Vista, 7 (which introduced a few new ones, in a slightly different style from Vista). And theres maybe even a few icons hidden away that are from Windows 95 or 98.

The whole thing is a mess, as each OS had different style icons. And if you think Vista's shiny glossy icons go with Windows 8 flat modern design style, then you need your eyes checked or something.

You explicitly said "desktop icons"...

This is why Microsoft is failing in practically everything they do, always doing things half-assed. How is that clown Ballmer still CEO?

Damn, the reg edit shortcut being Windows 95 style really affects my productivity. HOW DARE YOU MICROSOFT!

All sarcasm aside, i do find it quite strange that they did miss the installation window styles.

W32.Backdoor.KillAV.E said,

Which obviously includes everything within the desktop.

Umm... we're discussing the screenshots. The desktop screenshot shows all of 6 icons. None of which are from old versions. Your comment makes no sense in that context...

Windows 8.1 is a service pack because Microsoft is servicing and adding enhancements to Windows 8. The 1 in 8.1 means service pack 1. Imagine the backlash if Microsoft really did charge for the the 8.1 update!

The version number is actually going to be 6.3... 8.1 is just part of the name. The build number is all that usually gets bumped with Service Packs. For example, Win8RTM was build 9200, it would be bumped to 9201.

So in other words, not a service pack...

statm1 said,
The version number is actually going to be 6.3... 8.1 is just part of the name. The build number is all that usually gets bumped with Service Packs. For example, Win8RTM was build 9200, it would be bumped to 9201.

So in other words, not a service pack...

Semantics. Windows Sustained Engineering (WSE) is delivering this update - the same group responsible for Windows 7 SP1 and service packs for prior windows. The main Windows group is already working in Windows 9. Only reason they're bumping build now is to break out of the legacy support cycle where companies could keep the o/s around for a decade because service packs extended supported-until date. Obviously they got annoyed they created a system that allowed people and companies not to have to upgrade. Each time they bump build# now it resets their support commitment, so expect a lot more of it, at least annually.

So in other words, a service pack.

Edited by MVD, Apr 16 2013, 9:00pm :

MVD said,

Semantics. Windows Sustained Engineering (WSE) is delivering this update - the same group responsible for Windows 7 SP1 and service packs for prior windows. The main Windows group is already working in Windows 9.

So in other words, a service pack.


So 8.1 will only be a rollup of updates/security patches released in the last year? No. More than semantics MVD..

statm1 said,

So 8.1 will only be a rollup of updates/security patches released in the last year? No. More than semantics MVD..

8.1 is nothing more then the actual kernel name.

statm1 said,

So 8.1 will only be a rollup of updates/security patches released in the last year? No. More than semantics MVD..
It's more of OSR, though SP2 for WinXP did introduce some real changes as well.

Windows 8.1 is closer to Windows 98SE like how it was an improved over the original Windows 98.

This won't be a service pack.

Service packs are meant to be a pack of Windows updates that companies can easily push out. There have been service packs (Windows XP SP2) that added features like improved Wireless networking and Security center but that's it.

And if Apple can get away with selling point releases then so can Microsoft. They will probably sell this for like £30 or something like that which is worth it in my opinion.

Also, 8.1 is not the 'kernel' number, I believe the kernel number will be 6.3 from previous leaks.

Shadowzz said,

8.1 is nothing more then the actual kernel name.
mychaelo said,
It's more of OSR, though SP2 for WinXP did introduce some real changes as well.

Did you not read above and sense the sarcasm? I know it isn't a SP.

And no the kernel name has never had a version in it. Like tony said. Its called the NT kernel.