Windows Blue leaked build has hidden "slide to shut down" feature

The leaked 9364 build of Windows Blue that hit the Internet like a freight train on Sunday continues to yield more information about what Microsoft may or may not include when the final version is released, hopefully, later this year. One new feature that is technically hidden in the leaked build has now come to light.

The feature, as revealed on WinBeta.org, shows that the build of Windows Blue has a "slide to shut down" feature that is only accessible via an .exe file that's in the System32 folder. That might indicate that Microsoft is still testing this feature or decided not to fully implement it.

However, we do wish this kind of easy way to shut down a Windows Blue-based PC is indeed put into the final version. There have been many comments from Windows 8 users that the current way to shut down the computer is hard to find and also takes too long from the Start screen. Having a quick and easy way to shut down a PC from the Windows Blue Start screen would likely be welcomed by Windows 8 owners, particularly those who also have a Windows Phone device which has a similar shutdown feature.

Source: WinBeta.org | Image via WinBeta.org

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They're copying Apple, replacing basic staple desktop features with those more suited for tablets. I don't support this.

Even on touch screen devices that have this slide to shutdown feature, I have always wondered what's wrong with a button to shutdown.

thank you John Callaham for finally referring to it as the leaked build and referencing the build number. good job

Does m$ realize that not every one has a touch screen, and really wants to get simple tacks done (on the desktop) instead of trying to be cool like Apple.

Does blade1269 realise that some people actually have a touchscreen and they should have features that take advantage of their touch screens instead of being held back by people who don't?

If you don't have a touch screen, then it doesn't affect you.

don't cell phone manufacturers realize that people just want to make phone calls and send text messages instead of trying to be cool like Apple

testman said,
If you don't have a touch screen, then it doesn't affect you.

Mouse and keyboard users are annoyed because Microsoft is prioritising touch users while putting little to no effort into improving the experience for them. It's a classic case of a company courting new users while ignoring the existing user base and people don't take kindly to being ignored.

theyarecomingforyou said,

Mouse and keyboard users are annoyed because Microsoft is prioritising touch users while putting little to no effort into impjroving the experience for them. It's a classic case of a company courting new users while ignoring the existing user base and people don't take kindly to being ignored.

Wait wait wait... so the myriad of already-existing shut down options isn't ENOUGH for you?

testman said,
Wait wait wait... so the myriad of already-existing shut down options isn't ENOUGH for you?

No, because they're all less practical than the method used in Windows 7. It's great that there are numerous options but they are not right for ME.

theyarecomingforyou said,

No, because they're all less practical than the method used in Windows 7. It's great that there are numerous options but they are not right for ME.

Then by all means, run another OS, but please stop whinging.

sjaak327 said,
Then by all means, run another OS, but please stop whinging.

I like Windows. All the software I use runs on Windows. But I dislike this particular aspect of Windows 8. It's not "whinging" to explain why I don't like a particular implementation in a topic specifically about said implementation.

If you don't mind it then that's fine but you have no business telling me I shouldn't be allowed to express my opinion.

theyarecomingforyou said,

I like Windows. All the software I use runs on Windows. But I dislike this particular aspect of Windows 8. It's not "whinging" to explain why I don't like a particular implementation in a topic specifically about said implementation.

If you don't mind it then that's fine but you have no business telling me I shouldn't be allowed to express my opinion.

I never said you were not allowed to express your opinion, and you know it

However, there are several ways of shutting down a computer and you complain they are not right for you. That constitutes whinging like a little kid. Microsoft does not develop and release Windows just for you, something that you should take into account. If for whatever reason, the shutdown options in Windows 8 are not up to your standards, simply don't use it. The shutdown option has been discussed to death already, deal with it.

theyarecomingforyou said,

Mouse and keyboard users are annoyed because Microsoft is prioritising touch users while putting little to no effort into improving the experience for them. It's a classic case of a company courting new users while ignoring the existing user base and people don't take kindly to being ignored.

In fact, the slide to shutdown feature being discussed here can also be used with a mouse and keyboard, the executable in system32 can be pinned to the startmenu, if clicked, the slide to shutdown screen appears and hitting enter or moving your mouse down will shutdown the computer, no touch screen needed.

theyarecomingforyou said,

Mouse and keyboard users are annoyed because Microsoft is prioritising touch users while putting little to no effort into improving the experience for them. It's a classic case of a company courting new users while ignoring the existing user base and people don't take kindly to being ignored.


Haha you are funny, trolling the whole thread.

The desktop has NOT been ignored and has gotten more mouse/keyboard improvements then Windows 7 did from Vista.
Microsoft additionaly focusses on touch inputs, which they also did on Windows 7 (The power taskbar anyone?).... And suddenly everyone cant stop hating every single thing Microsoft does that is touch related.

For mouse/keyboard users, the touch stuff is ADDITIONAL.
It does not forcefully replace anything BUT the start screen (which IMO works better then the start menu regardless of keyboard, mouse or touch.)
So there isn't really anything to constantly cry about. Move on dude, get OSX or Linux and be done with the hating, can't be good for your heart.

theyarecomingforyou said,

Mouse and keyboard users are annoyed .....


Speak for yourself not the community troll.
I am an avid keyboard/mouse user, and a power user at that. Right clicking the start hot corner almost made me wet myself with delight to see that everything I want is RIGHT THERE.... no hunting through trying to find out if the feature I want is an accessory or a control panel item.

theyarecomingforyou said,

No, because they're all less practical than the method used in Windows 7. It's great that there are numerous options but they are not right for ME.
Funny that... cos the myriad of already-existing options in Windows 8 are EXACTLY THE SAME in Windows 7. So you're already talking nonsense.

testman said,
Funny that... cos the myriad of already-existing options in Windows 8 are EXACTLY THE SAME in Windows 7. So you're already talking nonsense.

The easiest mouse-based one is gone. And I have to question why some here are so determined to mock those that criticize this issue? It's not like it would affect you if MS made it easier and added another option. So what's the deal here?

dr_crabman said,

The easiest mouse-based one is gone. And I have to question why some here are so determined to mock those that criticize this issue? It's not like it would affect you if MS made it easier and added another option. So what's the deal here?
They may be in the process of doing it. Who knows? Considering that the update isn't even finished yet, complaining about touch users getting another way to shut down with a feature that Microsoft themselves haven't even mentioned while lamenting one single alternative way of shutting down (when the multiuple ways of shutting down are still there) is a really stupid way of getting the non-point across.

In other words, calm down and wait.

Um... it clearly says in the image "Slide to Shut Down" hence the reason they're calling it the 'slide to shut down feature'

So, you start at the desktop (or any app), and slide your finger/mouse from the top of the screen to the bottom? The same gesture as closing an app in Windows 8?

Doubtful Microsoft will implement the feature that way. It could be triggered way too easily. My guess is on tablets it will pop up when pressing and holding the lock button (like it does on Windows Phone).

basically you press your power button. then this comes up saying to swipe the image down to shut off. Its alike a "are you sure you want to power off the computer" .

This is how it works on windows phone 8

I think more than likely you have to tap something to half-bring down the shut down shutter, then you complete the process to shut down.

Josh the Nerd said,
....

Currently the function is a stand alone executable.
if the .exe is signed (so it can run on Windows RT), then I can see them implementing as .Neo and majortom1981 have indicated.

tomcoleman said,
people actually shut down these days ?? LOL!!!

Or is that only tree earth saving hugging hippies.

Uh yes. My home PC I do when I go to sleep.

majortom1981 said,
I do. I live on long island where we have some of the highest rates for electricity in the US/
chAos972 said,

Uh yes. My home PC I do when I go to sleep.


I think the OP was inferring that there's no real need to shut down when there's been the option to Hibernate for yeeeeears, which also turns off the PC but unlike the shut down process brings you back to the exact same point before you activated the feature.

I'm on the same boat as majortom... electricity costs are nuts. With Windows 8 taking less than 10 seconds to boot up or shutdown, time is never an issue.

I press my power button, take my morning whiz/bathroom run and everything's ready by the time I'm back... it's as if I never shutdown.

Uptime e-penis measurement is so 1999...

tomcoleman said,
people actually shut down these days ?? LOL!!!

Or is that only tree earth saving hugging hippies.

Since my job is "in the field" I can never guarantee a power source so saving every little bit of juice possible requires shutting down when i know i'm not going to be using my laptop for a while.

tomcoleman said,
people actually shut down these days ?? LOL!!!

Or is that only tree earth saving hugging hippies.

i use the sleep function. Problem is, not laptops and desktop have active NIC's that prevent the PC from staying sleep. As soon as the modem polls the connection, the PC wakes back up. Many dont know how to change the setting. So instead of waking up and the PC be already on, they fine it better to just shut it down.

Also consider some people have more than one PC, imagine the cost of leaving them all running?

TechieXP said,
i use the sleep function. Problem is, not laptops and desktop have active NIC's that prevent the PC from staying sleep. As soon as the modem polls the connection, the PC wakes back up. Many dont know how to change the setting. So instead of waking up and the PC be already on, they fine it better to just shut it down.

Also consider some people have more than one PC, imagine the cost of leaving them all running?

Then just use Hibernate?

majortom1981 said,
yes but you would still use the Shutdown button .
Shut down and every other option (Standby, Hibernate) has been a separate option since Vista. In other words, there isn't a specific shut down button where you get all the options listed.

tomcoleman said,
people actually shut down these days ?? LOL!!!

It's not just shutting down, as many drivers require you to restart your computer. The point is that using the mouse for shutting down with Windows 8 requires more accuracy and more mouse clicks than it did in Windows 7.

theyarecomingforyou said,

It's not just shutting down, as many drivers require you to restart your computer. The point is that using the mouse for shutting down with Windows 8 requires more accuracy and more mouse clicks than it did in Windows 7.

True. Which is why I use a shutdown shortcut that has worked since Windows 2000.

CTRL+ALT+R - job done without having to click several times.

testman said,
Then just use Hibernate?

u don't shut down ur pc, good for you!
others do shut down & contrary to your thinking everybody know about other options (Hibernate, Sleep etc etc). so how abt u just stfu now & let others do what they want!!

Make a shortcut to "C:\Windows\System32\shutdown.exe -s -f -t 0"

Pin it to your start screen.

Boom. You got yourself a Shutdown button.

testman said,
True. Which is why I use a shutdown shortcut that has worked since Windows 2000.

CTRL+ALT+R - job done without having to click several times.

I've always found using the mouse preferable to using the keyboard, so for me that's less practical. There's also the issue of less experienced users who simply aren't aware of all the hidden keyboard shortcuts, nor do they have the motivation or inclination to memorise and utilise them.

tomcoleman said,
people actually shut down these days ?? LOL!!!

Or is that only tree earth saving hugging hippies.

why is everyone who wants to save electric a tree hugger hippie? I cut 200 watts per hour out of my system, to save the earth? no...... to save me money in electric bills? yessssssss

testman said,
Then just use Hibernate?

Wasn't it never recommended to use Hibernate or is that discussion over with? I seem to recall people griping about Hibernate and the fact it had issues with cleaning out old states way back when. I realize it probably has gotten better but when you stay away from recommendations you don't always come back to them later unless you hear there's nothing wrong anymore. lol

theyarecomingforyou said,
I've always found using the mouse preferable to using the keyboard......

Why would you prefer an input technology where you are clearly not proficient enough?

Donny J said,

u don't shut down ur pc, good for you!
others do shut down & contrary to your thinking everybody know about other options (Hibernate, Sleep etc etc). so how abt u just stfu now & let others do what they want!!

How about you just STFU yourself and stop whining?

majortom1981 said,
Maybe this is just leftover from windows phone? Don't they share the same kernel ?

dude,they didn't port windows phone to windows 8. Windows 8 uses the NT kernel,you know the one that's been used in windows forever,from 7 to vista to xp. WP8 also uses the NT kernel ,which happened recently. WP7 used the CE kernel. The shell is just a user mode application,basically an app. WP8 uses a subset of the WinRT API,Windows 8 uses the full API. Windows phone apps will not run on windows 8,therefore this shutdown thing was written for windows 8. Just because something shares the same kernel,doesnt mean the API is the same.

It's a subset on the same API, theoretical, it should work. However, it's ment to happen with Blue that it does work, Windows and Windows Phone will share the same apps.

forgot to clarify, windows phone doesn't just use the subset of winrt, it also has specific libraries for phone only. the executable loader also works differently. yeah correct,blue is supposed to unify things.

I don't dismiss anyone's complaints because we all work differently and achieve productivity differently. But I just could never buy into "shutting down" is buried too deep. smh. Still can't. But at least this will satisfy those who do feel that way.

As a multi-monitor user I find triggering the Charm Bar unreliable, as the mouse will often move onto the second display and cause it to disappear. Shutting down your computer with a mouse requires more mouse accuracy and more mouse clicks than Windows 7 - that's objectively true and the larger your display the MORE this is an issue.

Is it a major issue? Of course not. Is it an inconvenience? Absolutely.

I buy that. The Charm bar never cause me a problem though. It's the app switch bar with multi-monitors that is just atrocious.

theyarecomingforyou said,
As a multi-monitor user I find triggering the Charm Bar unreliable, as the mouse will often move onto the second display and cause it to disappear. Shutting down your computer with a mouse requires more mouse accuracy and more mouse clicks than Windows 7 - that's objectively true and the larger your display the MORE this is an issue.

Is it a major issue? Of course not. Is it an inconvenience? Absolutely.

WIN+C. There, no problem.

It's always best to use all the input methods available appropriately, instead of relying heavily with one.

I'm aware of the keyboard shortcuts - like clicking the desktop and pressing Alt-F4 to shut down - but I've always found it more convenient to use the mouse, usually because I always have it in my hand. Usually I use my left hand for writing, drinking tea, etc.

As I said, it's not a major issue but the Windows 8 shut-down implementation is rather inelegant and poorly thought through. It's not progress.

theyarecomingforyou said,
As a multi-monitor user I find triggering the Charm Bar unreliable, as the mouse will often move onto the second display and cause it to disappear. Shutting down your computer with a mouse requires more mouse accuracy and more mouse clicks than Windows 7 - that's objectively true and the larger your display the MORE this is an issue.

Is it a major issue? Of course not. Is it an inconvenience? Absolutely.


In fact it requires exactly the same number of clicks.

Win7: move to start and click the button, select shutdown and click it, press enter or click ok.
Win8 move to charms, click power, select and click shutdown.

Call me crazy but there isn't any more effort required, it is just different.

You've got to be kidding. I'm not sure if that qualifies as some sort of mutated circular reasoning or not. I personally think the Charms bar is fine, and it's good they are adding a bit more to the tombstone formerly known as Devices Charm, but what you just said ... no, just no.

You basically said, learn or use keyboard shortcuts because the touch UI sucks. Or learn keyboard shortcuts because in many instances the touch UI sucks.

testman said,
WIN+C. There, no problem.

It's always best to use all the input methods available appropriately, instead of relying heavily with one.

sjaak327 said,
In fact it requires exactly the same number of clicks.

Win7: move to start and click the button, select shutdown and click it, press enter or click ok.
Win8 move to charms, click power, select and click shutdown.

Call me crazy but there isn't any more effort required, it is just different.

Win8: (perform gesture to bring up Settings button, then) Click 1-Settings 2-Power 3-Shut Down

Win7: Click 1-Start button 2-Shut Down

sjaak327 said,
In fact it requires exactly the same number of clicks.

Win7: move to start and click the button, select shutdown and click it, press enter or click ok.
Win8 move to charms, click power, select and click shutdown.

Call me crazy but there isn't any more effort required, it is just different.

Wrong.

Win 7: Click Start > Click Shutdown
Win 8: Trigger Charm Bar > Click Settings > Click Power > Click Shutdown

Also, most steps in Windows 8 take longer, particularly on larger displays. That's because the Settings button is relative to the centre of your screen, while the Power button is relative to the bottom of your screen. Each step also requires more accuracy.

@comingforyou @Csharp

OK, if shutdown is what you want, there is one less click. If it's restart, or sleep, or hibernate, it's the same. And yes, there is much less travel and everything is in closer proximity on Windows 7. It is quicker and technically more efficient, just activating the charms bar and then hovering over it to actually activate the Charms does take about as much time as just shutting down on Windows 7. But given what the task is, and how infrequently it is used, I call it a draw. Technically, and with a stopwatch, and if it was a repetitive action, Windows 7 would win easily. I just don't think it's that big of a deal especially in light of Modern UI Search and other usability issues, lol. Charms bar is OK, and advanced restart by holding down the shift is pretty cool. Unfortunately mine is broken, but that doesn't change the fact that it is cool.

theyarecomingforyou said,

Wrong.

Win 7: Click Start > Click Shutdown
Win 8: Trigger Charm Bar > Click Settings > Click Power > Click Shutdown

Also, most steps in Windows 8 take longer, particularly on larger displays. That's because the Settings button is relative to the centre of your screen, while the Power button is relative to the bottom of your screen. Each step also requires more accuracy.

theyarecomingforyou said,

Wrong.

Win 7: Click Start > Click Shutdown
Win 8: Trigger Charm Bar > Click Settings > Click Power > Click Shutdown

Also, most steps in Windows 8 take longer, particularly on larger displays. That's because the Settings button is relative to the centre of your screen, while the Power button is relative to the bottom of your screen. Each step also requires more accuracy.

This is getting childish. I perform the exact same number of actions when I'm done using my laptop regardless of OS:

Windows 7 -> Close lid.
Windows 8 -> Close lid.

It isn't 1997 anymore. That feeling of freshness you get from shutting down, like your laptop just stepped out of the shower and put on some deodorant, is all in your head. Reboot when the need arises; suspend otherwise.

Joshie said,
This is getting childish. I perform the exact same number of actions when I'm done using my laptop regardless of OS:

Windows 7 -> Close lid.
Windows 8 -> Close lid.

This discussion is about desktop users. Way to miss the point!

theyarecomingforyou said,

Wrong.

Win 7: Click Start > Click Shutdown
Win 8: Trigger Charm Bar > Click Settings > Click Power > Click Shutdown

Also, most steps in Windows 8 take longer, particularly on larger displays. That's because the Settings button is relative to the centre of your screen, while the Power button is relative to the bottom of your screen. Each step also requires more accuracy.

How does an interface that is optimized for touch require more accuracy, it is the opposite, the bigger targets are easier to hit. Just the reason why the old startup method isn't viable anymore, try hitting the shutdown option in Win7 with your fingers and you know exactly why it has been removed.

I admit I was wrong with Win7 shutdown, as a server guy, I described the shutdown procedure of Server 2008 R2 Windows 7's big brother. Allthough the fact remains that it only takes a whopping two clicks more on something that is done once a day normally, which probably equals a grand total of 0.5 seconds if that, hardly a matter to discuss.

Joshie said,

This is getting childish. I perform the exact same number of actions when I'm done using my laptop regardless of OS:

Windows 7 -> Close lid.
Windows 8 -> Close lid.

It isn't 1997 anymore. That feeling of freshness you get from shutting down, like your laptop just stepped out of the shower and put on some deodorant, is all in your head. Reboot when the need arises; suspend otherwise.

I'd love to see you try that on my triple screen setup on my stand...

http://www.neowin.net/forum/up...3-0-78199000-1328413240.jpg

I'm sure my screens will be dead when you're done though so I'll probably attack you...

sjaak327 said,
How does an interface that is optimized for touch require more accuracy, it is the opposite, the bigger targets are easier to hit.

The discussion is about DESKTOP users. Using the MOUSE to shut-down the computer requires more accuracy.

sjaak327 said,
I admit I was wrong with Win7 shutdown, as a server guy, I described the shutdown procedure of Server 2008 R2 Windows 7's big brother. Allthough the fact remains that it only takes a whopping two clicks more on something that is done once a day normally, which probably equals a grand total of 0.5 seconds if that, hardly a matter to discuss.

I've already made my point. It is more difficult and time consuming to shut-down a computer with a mouse in Windows 8 than it is in Windows 7. It's NOT a big deal but it IS an inconvenience.

theyarecomingforyou said,

This discussion is about desktop users. Way to miss the point!

If using a desktop, you could even do it faster, hit the power button, which is the equivalent of closing the lid.

theyarecomingforyou said,

The discussion is about DESKTOP users. Using the MOUSE to shut-down the computer requires more accuracy.

I've already made my point. It is more difficult and time consuming to shut-down a computer with a mouse in Windows 8 than it is in Windows 7. It's NOT a big deal but it IS an inconvenience.

But why waste 10+ post on something that isn't a big deal ?

That doesn't change the fact that what he said was pretty cool, and funny.

theyarecomingforyou said,

This discussion is about desktop users. Way to miss the point!

Very nice setup but he's right. It's not 1997 anymore. Stop throwing away good money. Time to step up from the neandrethal CUCM and enter the Lync Age! j/k, we have deployed both and due to the big proprietary iron investment most, including us, made in Cisco VOIP, they will coexist for some time. Unified Messaging easily destroyed Unity though. That's one riddance.

LogicalApex said,

I'd love to see you try that on my triple screen setup on my stand...

http://www.neowin.net/forum/up...3-0-78199000-1328413240.jpg

I'm sure my screens will be dead when you're done though so I'll probably attack you...

sjaak327 said,

But why waste 10+ post on something that isn't a big deal ?


In all fairness, we rage the most about the littlest things. Crazy stuff happens in the world and you have to drag opinions out of us, but if your office building changes a door from push to pull unexpectedly, it will infuriate you every time you come and go. Then to address complaints they replace it with a revolving door and you start vandalizing things. Two weeks later, it's an automatic sliding door and you still can't stop telling stories to temps about the golden age of pushing it open. That's the day you're giving a presentation with your laptop to the executive team, and when you go to move the mouse with the touchpad, accidentally slide in from a little too far left, switching applications to your browser displaying hamster porn GIFs. You'd think you'd be fired on the spot, but no, you're sent back to your cube with no word from anyone, sweating it off, wondering how many people have heard about what happened by now, every whispered conversation a dagger to your sense of self-worth. Might as well flush that LinkedIn profile now--not like it'd help you hide from your shame. And Facebook--no, you leave that alone for now. No point advertising to the world that you're just an unemployable bum now, doomed to a miserable sub-human existence of bagging groceries, delivering pizza, or--god help you--retail. Screw it. You grab your bag and head for the stairs--who needs an awkward elevator ride. Taking your last deep breath in the lobby of the building you've spent six years building a career in, you step out, the quiet whoosh of the sliding door punctuating the end of yet another failed chapter of your life.

Joshie said,

Screw it. You grab your bag and head for the stairs

Now we're talking about Modern UI Search and Context Menus if you can even call them that. Those two abominations will never be OK on the desktop pc (I guess based on Microsoft's Research, we should call them high end workstations) without major overhaul. ;>

MorganX said,

Now we're talking about Modern UI Search and Context Menus if you can even call them that. Those two abominations will never be OK on the desktop pc (I guess based on Microsoft's Research, we should call them high end workstations) without major overhaul. ;>

Psh. If we're getting into design, the obvious way to unify the desktop and modern UI is through unifying the start screen with the taskbar. Pinned icons should be analogous to pinned tiles, and the positioning of said icons and tiles should be defined in some intuitive way. Functionally, the taskbar becomes the start screen 'minimized', and you could arguably have a 'start' button that is functionally a 'maximize' command. With this unification, awkward modern UI functionality wouldn't feel out of place from the desktop, since some of it could still be activated from a minimized or partially-minimized 'task bar' view of start search.

This would require some redesign of both the start screen and the task bar, but a unification of the two would be the clearest, cleanest, and most intuitive way to unify both paradigms.

However, if they intend to instead evolve modern UI functionality to a point where the desktop UI is no longer necessary, this unification could never be part of the road map since it necessitates keeping the desktop UI around. I don't know the long-term vision for metro, nor do any of us, so I won't waste any time becoming emotionally invested in my ideas. That would be stupid.

theyarecomingforyou said,
I'm aware of the keyboard shortcuts - like clicking the desktop and pressing Alt-F4 to shut down - but I've always found it more convenient to use the mouse, usually because I always have it in my hand. Usually I use my left hand for writing, drinking tea, etc.

As I said, it's not a major issue but the Windows 8 shut-down implementation is rather inelegant and poorly thought through. It's not progress.

I really wonder what you use to type, or are you using voice guidance, in which case you could simpy say shutdown, I am sure that could be done

theyarecomingforyou said,
As a multi-monitor user I find triggering the Charm Bar unreliable, as the mouse will often move onto the second display and cause it to disappear. Shutting down your computer with a mouse requires more mouse accuracy and more mouse clicks than Windows 7 - that's objectively true and the larger your display the MORE this is an issue.

Is it a major issue? Of course not. Is it an inconvenience? Absolutely.

While aiming for the triggerpoint of the charms bar, move your mouse not only to the right.. also move it up or down!

MorganX said,
You've got to be kidding. I'm not sure if that qualifies as some sort of mutated circular reasoning or not. I personally think the Charms bar is fine, and it's good they are adding a bit more to the tombstone formerly known as Devices Charm, but what you just said ... no, just no.

You basically said, learn or use keyboard shortcuts because the touch UI sucks. Or learn keyboard shortcuts because in many instances the touch UI sucks.

No, I'm saying you use the appropriate input for the action you're trying to do. Using mouse exclusively, or touch screen exclusively or keyboar exclusively is not the best or the fastest way of working. What you do is use them ALL - this has ALWAYS been the case.

Not really. Few ordinary computer users ever use keyboard shortcuts, even most advanced users use them sparingly as they are rarely more efficient than the GUI. If they are repetitive, perhaps. I have always used a keyboard shortcut for "Run" because I never put it on the Start Menu, and you have to type what you want to run anyway so it is efficient to start focusing on typing.

Windows 8 is somewhat unique in that the Modern UI is so clumsy on a desktop, it has become more efficient to use keyboard shortcuts. That is a step backwards for the evolution of the GUI.

testman said,
No, I'm saying you use the appropriate input for the action you're trying to do. Using mouse exclusively, or touch screen exclusively or keyboar exclusively is not the best or the fastest way of working. What you do is use them ALL - this has ALWAYS been the case.

theyarecomingforyou said,

Win 7: Click Start > Click Shutdown
Win 8: Trigger Charm Bar > Click Settings > Click Power > Click Shutdown

In W7 you actually only need one click. Click on Start, hold the button and release it over Shutdown. I like W8, I really do but there's no defending this aspect. It's a step back for desktop users.

dr_crabman said,

In W7 you actually only need one click. Click on Start, hold the button and release it over Shutdown. I like W8, I really do but there's no defending this aspect. It's a step back for desktop users.

I look at it from all angles. It *is* true that people are shutting down less than they used to. It just isn't as important as it was in the past. As UIs are experimented with, less frequently used functions become less of a priority to keep at the 1-2 click level. Some people feel that shutting down hasn't hit a low enough priority yet, others feel the opposite. That's why this is an argument in the first place.

If the argument is that people should have a choice to make Shutting down more accessible, they of course do. A moderate amount of effort can add a shortcut to the Shutdown menu from the Win-X pop-up, accessible at any time. It's no more effort than the extraordinary amount of customization efforts people put into their smartphones, or--god help you--Linux.

airedwin said,
windows phone already has this as a confirmation to turn off phone after you've held the power button down

and we all know the default behavior on a x86/64 machine is for that action.
I would expect them to shoehorn this shutdown application into the press and hold action.

littleneutrino said,
not sure if that feature is going to be very useful for say, desktop or non touch screen laptops.

I never click shutdown. All my windows are configed to shutdown by pressing the power button. One press, PC off. Easier that slide to shutdown and clicking several times.

littleneutrino said,
not sure if that feature is going to be very useful for say, desktop or non touch screen laptops.
Then either get a touch screen or continue to use the already-existing myriad of ways to shut down.

techbeck said,

I never click shutdown. All my windows are configed to shutdown by pressing the power button. One press, PC off. Easier that slide to shutdown and clicking several times.
Same here, except I never use Shut Down ever, button configured to Hibernate instead.

Wait, someone is complaning about this new feature after the fact that some people complained on how "HARD" it is to shutdown a machine on Win8. WOW!!!

Microsoft just cannot get a break! LOL

Shadowzz said,
Then don't use it.

The issue is that it's DESKTOP users complaining about how inconvenient it is to shut down your computer in Windows 8 and yet this functionality is targeted at TABLET users. Mouse / touchpad is still the dominant input device, so it's understandable that those users are concerned about being neglected.

littleneutrino said,
not sure if that feature is going to be very useful for say, desktop or non touch screen laptops.

Then just hit the power button. That will shut down your computer.

hagjohn said,
Then just hit the power button. That will shut down your computer.

Some people have their computer tucked away under their desk.
Some people have their computer connected to a TV across the room and use a wireless mouse and keyboard.
Some people have health issues that make pressing the power button more difficult than using a mouse.
Some people prefer to use a mouse to shut down.

Nobody disputes that there are other ways to shut down your computer. The issue is that Microsoft made the primary method of shutting down your computer more difficult in order to prioritise touch users. The implementation is poor and illogical. I mean, how is shutting down your computer a "setting"?

theyarecomingforyou said,

Some people have their computer tucked away under their desk.
Some people have their computer connected to a TV across the room and use a wireless mouse and keyboard.
Some people have health issues that make pressing the power button more difficult than using a mouse.
Some people prefer to use a mouse to shut down.

Nobody disputes that there are other ways to shut down your computer. The issue is that Microsoft made the primary method of shutting down your computer more difficult in order to prioritise touch users. The implementation is poor and illogical. I mean, how is shutting down your computer a "setting"?


But your argument does not hold water, it isn't more difficult to shutdown a computer, they just moved it to a place where it does make more sense, the effort remains exactly the same. And of course, this does not discuss alt+f4 on the desktop, which has been the shutdown option that was there for over 20 years, including the non NT versions of Windows...

The fun thing is that people seem to have real trouble with changes, not too bright imho.

sjaak327 said,
But your argument does not hold water, it isn't more difficult to shutdown a computer, they just moved it to a place where it does make more sense, the effort remains exactly the same.

No, because as a multi-monitor user sometimes I'll overshoot the hot-corner; sometimes I'll trigger the Charm Bar but then moving to clicking 'Settings' I'll go off the screen and the Charm Bar will close; and each step takes longer than the Windows 7 method. It's more difficult to quickly shut down your computer.

I really couldn't care less whether other people like the new method. I don't.

theyarecomingforyou said,

No, because as a multi-monitor user sometimes I'll overshoot the hot-corner; sometimes I'll trigger the Charm Bar but then moving to clicking 'Settings' I'll go off the screen and the Charm Bar will close; and each step takes longer than the Windows 7 method. It's more difficult to quickly shut down your computer.

I really couldn't care less whether other people like the new method. I don't.

And somehow your opinion is worth more than others, your inability to activate charms on a multi monitor setup is somehow more relevant than mine, where on a multi monitor setup, I have no problems whatsoever to activate the charms bar. Maybe you should try and activate the charms bar on the right most monitor, no way you are overshooting it there. But I guess common sense is a bridge to far..

Really folks, we are debating for two additional clicks to shutdown a system? LOL

Here is the thing, the majority, and I say THE MAJORITY, don't shutdown their system that much anymore. It is only 2 clicks, it is not worth debating it, or to psychonalyze why 8 has additional 2 clicks to shutdown a machine.

Let's just hope that this new shutdown method is mouse friendly, and as long you don't have to bump the cursor TWICE on top of the screen for you to initiate the slide to shutdown feature, i think everything will be just fine.

littleneutrino said,
not sure if that feature is going to be very useful for say, desktop or non touch screen laptops.


It is, as you can pin the executable to the start menu, click on the tile and hit enter (or move your mouse down). I just tried it on the leaked build.

RommelS said,
Really folks, we are debating for two additional clicks to shutdown a system? LOL

What perverse logic you have. I don't see why it's acceptable to praise Microsoft for improving the boot-up time but unacceptable to criticise the slower shut-down process.

I rarely shut down my computer but I STILL find it annoying to do so in Windows 8. At the end of the day it makes for a poor user experience.

RommelS said,
Really folks, we are debating for two additional clicks to shutdown a system? LOL

This is the new standard by which we judge operating systems. Forget security, stability, performance, resource consumption, device compatibility, software compatibility... all of which Windows 8 excels in compared to previous versions and other competing operating systems.

No. Forget all that. It doesn't matter. All that matters now is how many clicks it takes to shut down the operating system.

theyarecomingforyou said,

What perverse logic you have. I don't see why it's acceptable to praise Microsoft for improving the boot-up time but unacceptable to criticise the slower shut-down process.


Do you know the meaning of the word "perverse"? It means headstrong, and from what I am seeing, you are the one that keeps fighting for that 2 clicks.

I rarely shut down my computer but I STILL find it annoying to do so in Windows 8. At the end of the day it makes for a poor user experience.

Now tell me if that logic works out. So basically, you hardly shutdown your machine, and you get annoyed by two clicks when you have to shutdown your machine, and you are already considering that a poor user experience - two clicks that you would hardly use?

That two clicks that everyone hardly use, is not enough to cause RSI.

My, my, that is pretty pathetic.

ModernMech said,

This is the new standard by which we judge operating systems. Forget security, stability, performance, resource consumption, device compatibility, software compatibility... all of which Windows 8 excels in compared to previous versions and other competing operating systems.

No. Forget all that. It doesn't matter. All that matters now is how many clicks it takes to shut down the operating system.

It's just the tip of the iceberg for poor user interface design. After that comes the 3 or 4 different control panels, the mostly useless charms bar (offering options that you can click but that then tell you they do nothing since you weren't in the right app or in Metro etc), the downright idiotic splitscreen mode for Metro apps (hell, even in Blue it apparently only allows you to resize to 50/50 rather than freely determine how much space you want an app to take on the screen)...

Shutting down is not perceived as a setting either so just finding it will cause confusion.

RommelS said,
Do you know the meaning of the word "perverse"?

It means "obstinate in opposing what is right, reasonable, or accepted", which was exactly what I intended given the succeeding sentence.

RommelS said,
Now tell me if that logic works out. So basically, you hardly shutdown your machine, and you get annoyed by two clicks when you have to shutdown your machine, and you are already considering that a poor user experience - two clicks that you would hardly use?

I get annoyed when I go to trigger the Charm Bar and I overshoot or it disappears when my mouse moves on my secondary display. That was never an issue with Windows 7.

RommelS said,
That two clicks that everyone hardly use, is not enough to cause RSI.

My, my, that is pretty pathetic.

I'm disappointed that you felt the need to respond with such a childish insult. We're done here.

I guess RSI and using the word pretty pathetic is now childish. I just think that you don't have a good enough rebottle with this conversation. In addition, you are the first one that actually pulled a personal attack on our lively conversation. Childish, I don't think so, but have a very nice day Sir.

theyarecomingforyou said,

It means "obstinate in opposing what is right, reasonable, or accepted", which was exactly what I intended given the succeeding sentence.

Oh yeah, and I forgot, 2 clicks and you still get annoyed. Move the charm bar to the very far right, so that you will not over shoot it.

RommelS said,

Oh yeah, and I forgot, 2 clicks and you still get annoyed. Move the charm bar to the very far right, so that you will not over shoot it.

My secondary display - a 42" HDTV - is located at a 90 degree angle to my primary monitor and is used for media consumption. It would be impractical to trigger the Charm Bar on it.

theyarecomingforyou said,

My secondary display - a 42" HDTV - is located at a 90 degree angle to my primary monitor and is used for media consumption. It would be impractical to trigger the Charm Bar on it.

Short from swapping the two, you could try and not overshoot the charms bar. I personally have no issues to activate it, on both monitors.

sjaak327 said,
Short from swapping the two, you could try and not overshoot the charms bar. I personally have no issues to activate it, on both monitors.

It's usually because I try to trigger it quickly. I appreciate that that's my own fault but that's a result of the bad UI design. I'm far from the only person annoyed by it.

theyarecomingforyou said,

It's usually because I try to trigger it quickly. I appreciate that that's my own fault but that's a result of the bad UI design. I'm far from the only person annoyed by it.


You are aware every monitor has a charms bar and app switcher right?
So if you have issues getting your mouse pointer stuck at the 5pixel high corner.
Pick the corner in your other monitor..

Shadowzz said,

You are aware every monitor has a charms bar and app switcher right?
So if you have issues getting your mouse pointer stuck at the 5pixel high corner.
Pick the corner in your other monitor..

I responded to that earlier.

theyarecomingforyou said,
......

Holy F you're being deliberately obtuse.
How about you walk over to your breaker box and pull that big switch, it will shut down everything since you can't seem to use a mouse effectively

theyarecomingforyou said,

No, because as a multi-monitor user sometimes I'll overshoot the hot-corner; sometimes I'll trigger the Charm Bar but then moving to clicking 'Settings' I'll go off the screen and the Charm Bar will close; and each step takes longer than the Windows 7 method. It's more difficult to quickly shut down your computer.

I really couldn't care less whether other people like the new method. I don't.

Or you could use the same method that has been in place since Windows 2000: create a shortcut with a key combination CTRL+ALT+S and pointing to "shutdown.exe -t 01"