WP7 Marketplace hits 25,000 apps

Just 8 months after the platform’s launch, Windows Phone 7 has hit the 25,000 app milestone – and it doesn’t appear to be slowing down at all. WindowsPhoneApplist is currently sporting 25,018 applications in its Marketplace tracker, and is reporting 1,947 new applications just in the last two weeks with 6,979 approved developers.

This is great news for the Windows Phone 7 community, as Marketplace milestones such as this one seem to be coming quite frequently: in April the Marketplace surpassed 15,000 applications and before that in March we saw 12,000 applications. This means that in just two months, the WP7 Marketplace has grown by 10,000 applications, and as WP7applist reports (whose app count is just under 25,000), 262 apps were added to the Marketplace in the last 24 hours with 186 apps getting updated each day on average.

While this number may seem small, we can compare it to other platforms to see just how well the WP7 Marketplace is performing. It took Apple’s App Store the very same 8 months to hit the 25,000 app mark, after which it exponentially increased at around 10,000 apps per month. On the other hand, it took the Android Market over a year to reach the 25,000 app milestone. Currently the App Store and Android Market have over 525,000 and 400,000 apps respectively (including inactive apps).

The Windows Phone Marketplace is definitely growing, so it won’t be too long until we’ll be seeing WP7 hit the 50K, and then 100K apps milestones.

Graph courtesy of WindowsPhoneApplist

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> The Windows Phone Marketplace is definitely growing, so it won't be too long until we'll be seeing WP7 hit the 50K, and then 100K apps milestones.

...and then what? These milestones are absolutely meaningless other than perception, and being a bullet point on a brochure. It's all about the quality of the apps--I wish that's where the comparisons were being made.

I don't agree
Yea, 50k apps are overkill, even 10k is overkill imo

BUT

You need at least a thousand of the SAME app to get a great quality one differentiate itself from the others.

You might occasionally get lucky with a great app on a subject - but the app numbers are what push devs into making that happen no matter what.

So, we need more apps! Also, it's a healthy indication of what the market in general thinks of the phone and operating system.

Azyr said,
I don't agree
Yea, 50k apps are overkill, even 10k is overkill imo

BUT

You need at least a thousand of the SAME app to get a great quality one differentiate itself from the others.

You might occasionally get lucky with a great app on a subject - but the app numbers are what push devs into making that happen no matter what.

So, we need more apps! Also, it's a healthy indication of what the market in general thinks of the phone and operating system.


Where in the history of software development has there been evidence of your theory?

There weren't thousands of office suites around when Lotus took the business world by storm, and there weren't thousands more when Microsoft Word did the same thing later. There were dozens, rather than thousands, of shareware email clients floating around in the 16-bit era for users to choose from when people started swearing by Eudora (or whatever was big back then), and there were dozens, rather than thousands, of legitimate malware prevention suites available when ESET barely differentiated itself by just learning from the successes and failures of the status quo.

Doom changed the face of computer gaming not because it rose from the ashes of thousands, or even hundreds, or even dozens of other 3D shooter games, but because id software was an innovative (closed source) development group that took what hardware was newly capable of and made it happen.

It isn't thousands of software lookalikes that spur innovation and quality. It's advances in platform capabilities and new ways of thinking that do. Sometimes one or two inspired initial successes will lead to a 'next generation' advancement that learns from them, but it's just as likely that a single company will pave the way with something great (the Myst franchise, for example), just to see a bunch of later crappy copy cats and ultimately the complete death of the genre itself.

But no game, no genre, no platform in the 25 years of computing that I've experienced has exhibited some sort of mutation-esque software 'evolution' rising from nothing more than pre-existing software on the same hardware. Every dramatic change has been a result of hardware advancements (accelerometers, force feedback, 3D, etc), unrelated backend software developments (libraries, database progress, etc), or new background capabilities (see: cloud).

The only conceivable exception to this might be the open source community, where users are just so USED to thousands of useless, feature incomplete, poorly designed programs floating around the murky depths of their repositories that quality software appearing at the exact same frequency as in the proprietary development world feels like it can be accredited to the existence of subpar software somehow acting as a motivator. But that argument can't even be seriously made unless you qualify it by believing those quality developers had been exposed to enough of that crappy software to be inspired in the first place, and you're willing to insult them by suggesting they aren't innovative enough to develop it on their own, rather than out of a reactionary desire to 'improve' where other, lesser developers failed.

If anything, the best thing for making WP7 a unique, high quality platform is for Microsoft to keep making it more capable, and NOT encourage a flood of crappy, search-engine numbing fluffware.

Edited by Joshie, Jul 1 2011, 4:51pm :

Joshie said,

Where in the history of software development has there been evidence of your theory?
[...]
If anything, the best thing for making WP7 a unique, high quality platform is for Microsoft to keep making it more capable, and NOT encourage a flood of crappy, search-engine numbing fluffware.

This guy gets it.

Nobody wants to sift through thousands of crappy entries before finding something decent--that's about the worse thing you can do for first impressions. The platform would have a stigma associated with it, in that it can only attract hooligans trying to pass off for developers.

Inb4 the app quality sucks.

I've had a iOS and Android phone, and i've found the WP7 marketplace quality is alot better than both of them. The price's are a little high, but your paying for a game. And the develpers deserve more than 99p. I'm sure the prices will go down when the maretshare starts to increase .

+1 wp7 (beta testing mango, it's amazing too )

Xerax said,
I'm sure the prices will go down when the maretshare starts to increase

Don't be so sure. It's not like early Android market software cost significantly more. If anything, back when Android was a geeky little joke of a platform, apps were even cheaper than they are now. Hobbyist devs (the ones who got started on Android) wanted to sell on volume rather than margin, and the dollar-app model really took off.

Nowadays games are between $5-10 rather than $1-5, and it's less and less unusual to see $15+ software dinking around (SPB Shell, I'm looking at you).

DukeEsquire said,
I really want to like WP7, but there isn't a single WP7 phone that I want.

Everyone has their own likes, I enjoy my LG Optimus 7, but with that said I think we could get some nice mango phones later this year. At least Nokia will bring it's A game, hope the others do as well.

DukeEsquire said,
I really want to like WP7, but there isn't a single WP7 phone that I want.

Omnia 7 has the best screen in the market. Super Amoled baby. I have just bought it. Happy ever since!!!

DukeEsquire said,
I really want to like WP7, but there isn't a single WP7 phone that I want.

Don't like the Dell Venue Pro?

I can't wait for the new phones to be released. There will probably be at least 35,000 apps by the time the Nokia comes out.

GP007 said,
Mango and all it's juicy APIs will bring a huge influx of new apps later this year, I can't wait.

Agree, especially the socket API, I think many applications can benefit from it.

GraphiteCube said,

Agree, especially the socket API, I think many applications can benefit from it.

Two MS internet bots talking to each other! Whahaha

Ok there are a number of things to take into account here;

1- The marketplace is 8 months old (closer to 7 actually)
2- The phone sales are low : the audience isn't what you generally get if you went to iOS or droid
3- There are 5k or so apps with "trial" mode, to compare you would need to convert them to "lite" apps.

So, you have a phone (that doesnt sell so well), and in only 8 months time you manage to hit 30.000 apps! (added lite apps too).

That is truly good work imo.

As a user of the platform, i can vouch that the app quality is quite good as of now. Most of the main triple-A titles got updates last week and are a whole lot better. I've yet to regret a single app I've bought so far.

So that means that you have a tremendous success in my book. Kudos to MS.

Sacha said,
I thought that trial apps are included in the 25,000.

See: http://wp7applist.com/en-US/stats/
18% of the 25,000 are trial apps.

Trial & Full apps are the same, so they get counted only once whereas on other platforms you have a "full" and "lite" version of the same app.

For example, i use Skywallet as a password manager, i first DL'ed it and selected "trial" instead of "buy". After a few days i decided i liked it and selected the "buy full version" option from inside the app. The app was converted to full - all my settings and DB entries were kept intact and the amount was deducted from my bank account.

Azyr said,

Trial & Full apps are the same, so they get counted only once whereas on other platforms you have a "full" and "lite" version of the same app.

For example, i use Skywallet as a password manager, i first DL'ed it and selected "trial" instead of "buy". After a few days i decided i liked it and selected the "buy full version" option from inside the app. The app was converted to full - all my settings and DB entries were kept intact and the amount was deducted from my bank account.


This is totally accurate. Anyone who's ever browsed the Android Market for even a few seconds is aware that an enormous number of applications are either posted twice (full version and lite/free/trial version) or posted once, but have a second paid 'unlocker' application you can buy.

This, as well as fluff apps like sound boards, plug-in packs, app themes listed as stand-alone apps, and other offenders are why numbers vs. numbers comparisons of app stores are for fanboys, and not for serious/mature discussions about the health of platform ecosystems.

WP7 is no doubt still behind iOS and Android in terms of unique app quantities, but the question of whether or not the same variety of quality software is available for users to have an equally enjoyable experience is a lot more difficult to judge without sitting down and using both platforms, and certainly no frito munching tech douche posting to web forums with a fossboner or half-eaten apple fetish is in any position to have a valid opinion.

KingCrimson said,
Who says all 475K are useful? So many iFarts...

You saying that all of these 25K apps on WP7 are useful? Don't make me laugh; obviously you haven't visited the Marketplace in a while.

KingCrimson said,

Who says all 475K are useful? So many iFarts...

Apples full of junk apps. Whenever i want an app of feature i have on droid on my friend iOS devices, they arent there. Id say the 25k apps on WP7 are probably a refinement of the junk that made it to iOS when it was fresh n new. Sometimes less is more..at least thats what ive found with the Android market