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Was playing with XrandR, now can't login :(

profile messed up

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5 replies to this topic

#1 javagreen

javagreen

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 16-July 04

Posted 13 August 2012 - 04:42

Long story short, I was messing around with XrandR and creating a few custom screen resolutions - a couple well beyond the native res of my monitor (was testing something). I had read that all these changes would be lost on next reboot, and would only stick around if I edited the LightDM/X.org config files and added it myself there.

That's why I thought it was safe - but no such thing :(

What happens now is, Ubuntu 12.04 just throws me back to the login screen regardless of the DE I choose (Gnome 3, Gnome classic, Classic with no effects, Unity) none of them work - which means my profile, or rather stuff related to display in my profile, is buggered.

Luckily, I had created another User a while ago, and I'm able to log-in using that account. Which means I should be able to recover my profile somehow - and I need help. I tried this fix here, but it didn't work : http://ubuntuforums....06#post12036406

Please help me recover my main user profile :(


#2 +Karl L.

Karl L.

    xorangekiller

  • Tech Issues Solved: 15
  • Joined: 24-January 09
  • Location: Virginia, USA
  • OS: Debian Testing

Posted 13 August 2012 - 05:01

I believe that the following should work (but I have not tested it):

rm -rf /home/your_user_profile/.gconf/apps/gnome_settings_daemon/xrandr


#3 OP javagreen

javagreen

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 16-July 04

Posted 13 August 2012 - 05:08

I believe that the following should work (but I have not tested it):

rm -rf /home/your_user_profile/.gconf/apps/gnome_settings_daemon/xrandr


Cheers, let me test this :)

#4 OP javagreen

javagreen

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 16-July 04

Posted 13 August 2012 - 05:24

I believe that the following should work (but I have not tested it):

rm -rf /home/your_user_profile/.gconf/apps/gnome_settings_daemon/xrandr


I could kiss you right now :D

I didn't have a folder called gnome_settings_daemon or xrandr for that matter over there, BUT I found a few files from my earlier XrandR messings in that location (.rez files with custom resolutions) and deleted them. I'm able to log back in to my original profile flawlessly now.. no issues, ****'s back to normal :p

Thanks again!

#5 +Karl L.

Karl L.

    xorangekiller

  • Tech Issues Solved: 15
  • Joined: 24-January 09
  • Location: Virginia, USA
  • OS: Debian Testing

Posted 14 August 2012 - 23:08

I'm glad to hear that you solved your problem. For future reference, a good way to find your configuration settings for a particular program (assuming you know its name and it names its configuration files logically) is as follows:

find ~ | grep -i 'xrandr'

Also note that '~' in the above command denotes your home directory. It may be replaced with any path you want to search. For example, if I was logged in as root and wanted to search for the xrandr settings in my profile, I could replace '~' with '/home/xorangekiller' in the above command.

Before anyone points this out: yes, I could have used find's '-iname' switch instead of piping to 'grep -i'. However, I find that '-iname' will sometimes fail to find things that grep will not. I don't really want to debate it (unless anyone can give me a good technical answer as to why that is; I'm somewhat curious).

#6 OP javagreen

javagreen

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 16-July 04

Posted 15 August 2012 - 16:47

I'm glad to hear that you solved your problem. For future reference, a good way to find your configuration settings for a particular program (assuming you know its name and it names its configuration files logically) is as follows:

find ~ | grep -i 'xrandr'

Also note that '~' in the above command denotes your home directory. It may be replaced with any path you want to search. For example, if I was logged in as root and wanted to search for the xrandr settings in my profile, I could replace '~' with '/home/xorangekiller' in the above command.

Before anyone points this out: yes, I could have used find's '-iname' switch instead of piping to 'grep -i'. However, I find that '-iname' will sometimes fail to find things that grep will not. I don't really want to debate it (unless anyone can give me a good technical answer as to why that is; I'm somewhat curious).


Cheers, that's quite useful mate :)



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