Jump to content



Photo
google fiber

  • Please log in to reply
19 replies to this topic

#1 thomastmc

thomastmc

    Unofficial Attorney of Neowin

  • Joined: 18-July 12
  • Location: Kansas City
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
  • Phone: Lumia 928

Posted 09 September 2012 - 22:23

Time Warner Cable increased it's Wideband speed from 50/5 Mbps to 60/6 Mbps in Kansas City just days before Google Fiber starts to hook up customers to their 1/1 Gbps fiber network.

Google's fiber service in Kansas City will cost $70 a month for 1/1 Gbps internet, and $120 a month for 1/1 Gbps internet, HDTV with a 2TB 8 tuner DVR, a 1TB Google Drive, and a Nexus 7 tablet remote control.

Time Warner's Wideband service costs $109 a month (or a $99 promotional rate) for 50/5 Mbps internet.

http://fiber.google.com/about/

http://www.timewarne...eband-internet/


Posted Image


#2 xbamaris

xbamaris

    Neowinian

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 27-October 09

Posted 09 September 2012 - 22:27

Im so jealous of those who get Google Fiber! Its soooo not fair :(

#3 OP thomastmc

thomastmc

    Unofficial Attorney of Neowin

  • Joined: 18-July 12
  • Location: Kansas City
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
  • Phone: Lumia 928

Posted 09 September 2012 - 23:24

Im so jealous of those who get Google Fiber! Its soooo not fair :(


I saw someone local tweet the other day, "Finally there is a perk to living in Kansas City".

#4 deactivated_

deactivated_

    Deactivated_

  • Joined: 05-August 08

Posted 10 September 2012 - 00:18

I'd love 6Mbit up.

TWC here just finally bumped it up from 384kbit up to 1.5Mbit up. Seems infinitely faster in comparison, but 6Mbit would be amazing.

#5 I am Reid

I am Reid

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 03-November 05
  • Location: Columbus, Ohio

Posted 10 September 2012 - 00:37

if google wants to force ISP to up improve their networks and provide better speeds they need to advertise the UPLOAD speeds. I am completely fine with 50Mbps, that's more than enough for most people, but when they have a 1-5Mbps upload on the other side that is completely unacceptable. Most consumers are not aware of the upload speed and don't pay much attention to it, so ISP have no reason to increase it.

#6 Xilo

Xilo

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 28-May 04
  • Location: Austin, TX

Posted 10 September 2012 - 00:53

if google wants to force ISP to up improve their networks and provide better speeds they need to advertise the UPLOAD speeds. I am completely fine with 50Mbps, that's more than enough for most people, but when they have a 1-5Mbps upload on the other side that is completely unacceptable. Most consumers are not aware of the upload speed and don't pay much attention to it, so ISP have no reason to increase it.

Most consumers (except people that use private bittorrent sites) aren't really too concerned with upload speeds.

#7 OP thomastmc

thomastmc

    Unofficial Attorney of Neowin

  • Joined: 18-July 12
  • Location: Kansas City
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
  • Phone: Lumia 928

Posted 10 September 2012 - 01:07

if google wants to force ISP to up improve their networks and provide better speeds they need to advertise the UPLOAD speeds. I am completely fine with 50Mbps, that's more than enough for most people, but when they have a 1-5Mbps upload on the other side that is completely unacceptable. Most consumers are not aware of the upload speed and don't pay much attention to it, so ISP have no reason to increase it.


The Google Fiber connection is 1/1 Gbps. They simply refer to it as the Gigabit network. Gigabit refers to both upload and download speed.

Admittedly, some might find that confusing, and it is only fully detailed in the fine print at the bottom of the page linked below.

"...Google Fiber offers up to 1000 Mb/sec download and upload".
http://fiber.google.com/about/

Oops, it's also found at the top of this page under the graphic:

"Up to one gigabit upload & download speed"
http://fiber.google....ns/residential/

#8 OP thomastmc

thomastmc

    Unofficial Attorney of Neowin

  • Joined: 18-July 12
  • Location: Kansas City
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
  • Phone: Lumia 928

Posted 10 September 2012 - 01:31

Most consumers (except people that use private bittorrent sites) aren't really too concerned with upload speeds.


Hey my friend, students are consumers too.



#9 Xilo

Xilo

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 28-May 04
  • Location: Austin, TX

Posted 10 September 2012 - 01:40

Hey my friend, students are consumers too.

I said most consumers. Animation and other media students that actually require sending large files back and forth like that aren't exactly common.

#10 OP thomastmc

thomastmc

    Unofficial Attorney of Neowin

  • Joined: 18-July 12
  • Location: Kansas City
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
  • Phone: Lumia 928

Posted 10 September 2012 - 01:52

I said most consumers. Animation and other media students that actually require sending large files back and forth like that aren't exactly common.


You're right. The average consumer isn't aware of what faster upload speeds will mean for them. There are projects being developed right now that will change that though.

Consider this, each consumer will have the ability to host and serve their own content on a connection that can handle streaming HD @5Mbps to many users concurrently.

#11 I am Reid

I am Reid

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 03-November 05
  • Location: Columbus, Ohio

Posted 10 September 2012 - 06:00

The Google Fiber connection is 1/1 Gbps. They simply refer to it as the Gigabit network. Gigabit refers to both upload and download speed.

Admittedly, some might find that confusing, and it is only fully detailed in the fine print at the bottom of the page linked below.

"...Google Fiber offers up to 1000 Mb/sec download and upload".
http://fiber.google.com/about/

Oops, it's also found at the top of this page under the graphic:

"Up to one gigabit upload & download speed"
http://fiber.google....ns/residential/


yes, i understand that the google connection speeds go both ways, but all the press doesnt come from the upload speeds, its the downloads. When you see an article they give layman type facts like how fast you can download an mp3, album, movie, ect... Now if they were to start to compare the upload connection for something people would use but they dont realize its dependent on the upload speed, like if they gave facts of how fast you could backup your computer to a web based storage solution, upload a video to youtube, or backup your entire photo album to the web. If they did that and compared how long it would take to backup 1gb of data on a 5Mbps connection people would really start to take note and it would put pressure on ISP's to stop cheaping out on the upload speeds. Upload speeds are not only important to bittorent users, it comes into play everytime you do anything on the internet, it just doesnt get all the glory like downloading does.

#12 OP thomastmc

thomastmc

    Unofficial Attorney of Neowin

  • Joined: 18-July 12
  • Location: Kansas City
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
  • Phone: Lumia 928

Posted 10 September 2012 - 06:22

yes, i understand that the google connection speeds go both ways, but all the press doesnt come from the upload speeds, its the downloads. When you see an article they give layman type facts like how fast you can download an mp3, album, movie, ect... Now if they were to start to compare the upload connection for something people would use but they dont realize its dependent on the upload speed, like if they gave facts of how fast you could backup your computer to a web based storage solution, upload a video to youtube, or backup your entire photo album to the web. If they did that and compared how long it would take to backup 1gb of data on a 5Mbps connection people would really start to take note and it would put pressure on ISP's to stop cheaping out on the upload speeds. Upload speeds are not only important to bittorent users, it comes into play everytime you do anything on the internet, it just doesnt get all the glory like downloading does.


I couldn't agree more.

Just one simple example of a typical everyday family use of a gigabit upload stream would be to copy a 1080p video of their kid's school play onto the computer, and then distribute it to the rest of the family (grandparents, aunts, uncles) via an email with a link that streams the video from their own computer. Quick, easy, private.

The family doesn't need to upload it someplace, saving time. Several family members could stream the video at one time, just by clicking a link in an email. And, it's truly private. You keep absolute control of the video without uploading it to Facebook or YouTube, and the link is only available to people you give it to through email. No passwords, no circles, no opt ins or opt outs, etc.

I've been thinking about this for years. There are so many ways to take advantage of upstream, and there will be a slew of products to fill the current void.

Another thing that I haven't heard talked about much is that Google is setting up 400 Wi-Fi hotspots around Kansas City. Users will have more access to their data while mobile than has been previously possible.

#13 Adam Taylor

Adam Taylor

    Resident One Post Wonder

  • Joined: 30-September 12

Posted 30 September 2012 - 21:17

Anyone who is naysaying this service is out of their mind. I'm going to give you an example. I live in Overland Park Kansas. Just a tad outside of the cities that are receiving this service. It literally stopped 5 miles north of me. Grrr. I have two choices for internet and basically one for tv (tv's not too important to me though). ATT and Time Warner. ATT has provided me with consistent service for years. I appreciate that. I rarely have a problem....but, Ive become used to their speeds. When I want to upload a project I've been working on, music/multimedia, I wait and wait and wait and wait...it is what it is. I could go with Time Warner....but when you look at their pricing and fees their advertised prices are nowhere near what they claim them to be. Charge for the dvr, have to charge for running line here and there...oh wait the kids want tv in their playroom....well there's a charge for that. Pfft. I'm sick of the "choices" in this city and am so happy Google has come to town. Now if Overland Park could get its Yippy, or is that Huppy, ass out of a bind and stop regulating so heavily on instillation of utilities I might have somewhere to go with this. Anyone know how to build a wifi receiver that will reach 5+ miles? lol

#14 SuperKid

SuperKid

    Im no superman

  • Joined: 21-April 08
  • OS: Windows 8.1, OS X 10.10, iOS 8
  • Phone: iPhone 6 Plus

Posted 01 October 2012 - 16:51

I couldn't agree more.

Just one simple example of a typical everyday family use of a gigabit upload stream would be to copy a 1080p video of their kid's school play onto the computer, and then distribute it to the rest of the family (grandparents, aunts, uncles) via an email with a link that streams the video from their own computer. Quick, easy, private.

The family doesn't need to upload it someplace, saving time. Several family members could stream the video at one time, just by clicking a link in an email. And, it's truly private. You keep absolute control of the video without uploading it to Facebook or YouTube, and the link is only available to people you give it to through email. No passwords, no circles, no opt ins or opt outs, etc.

I've been thinking about this for years. There are so many ways to take advantage of upstream, and there will be a slew of products to fill the current void.

Another thing that I haven't heard talked about much is that Google is setting up 400 Wi-Fi hotspots around Kansas City. Users will have more access to their data while mobile than has been previously possible.


NAS drives allow sharing over the internet, Gigabit Upstream would be a massive improvement for stuff like this :) I wish in the UK we was on at least 20Mbps upload now. Upstream is also important for games and when there are a lot of users on a network, it would benefit too.

#15 OP thomastmc

thomastmc

    Unofficial Attorney of Neowin

  • Joined: 18-July 12
  • Location: Kansas City
  • OS: Windows 8.1 Pro
  • Phone: Lumia 928

Posted 01 October 2012 - 17:21

NAS drives allow sharing over the internet, Gigabit Upstream would be a massive improvement for stuff like this :) I wish in the UK we was on at least 20Mbps upload now. Upstream is also important for games and when there are a lot of users on a network, it would benefit too.


That's very true.

Where dialup and broadband were one and two dimensional, upload streams of hundreds of Mbps add a whole new dimension to grasp. It will definitely turn the current "broadband paradigm", of simply serving content to consumers, on it's head.