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I want one!!!

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The LED has a 25 year life span, the electronics in the bulb certainly don't.

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The LED has a 25 year life span, the electronics in the bulb certainly don't.

Depends on what's used in them, they very well could work for that long. Heck the NES was made in the 80s and there's still some of those kicking around.

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Depends on what's used in them, they very well could work for that long. Heck the NES was made in the 80s and there's still some of those kicking around.

True, I'd be more surprised to see whatever wireless networking 25 years from now still being compatible with this. In 2037 the kids then probably won't even know what WiFi or radio even are. Pretty slick though.

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I'm in your bulbs changing your colors!

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Will it work with WI-FI in 25 years? Will it update itself from N to AC to...

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Pity you cant order one or pledge, as the option to do so has been removed :(

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True, I'd be more surprised to see whatever wireless networking 25 years from now still being compatible with this. In 2037 the kids then probably won't even know what WiFi or radio even are.

I fully expect that the WiFi aspect of the device to either loose relevance or discontinue to work. With networking and cell phone technology advancing so fast, the antennas in the device may no longer be compatible with access points before the end of it's life span and the supported mobile platforms may no longer exist.

Now, the two greatest factors to consider in the lifespan of the device are corrosion due to the elements (mainly moisture) and tin whiskers. Tin whiskers are crystalline structures that grow out of tin that can be found in the metal hardware as well as solder itself. Considering the electronics in the device have to be insanely small (most likely TSSOP and QFN) packages. These have incredibly small distances between the leads on the devices and could fall victim to whiskering. The issue can be mitigated extremely well but the main failure point is the hardware itself.

With correct component selection, isolated hardware (screws, brackets) and perhaps potting compound covering the boards, the device could potentially make it to the end of the desired life span.

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Only one? I want a pack of ten.

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Interesting. It'd be cool if it takes off.

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I'm not sure that I can afford that.

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