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SuperJediMedia

Wifi Signal Strength Software

24 posts in this topic

I looked and couldn't find any.

I just want a small software that displays signal strength in number %... what software is good?

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Not that one.

It doesn't even show signal % at all!

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No, just for Windows. Not cellphones.

Wait RSSI is the signal strength?

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Not that one.

It doesn't even show signal % at all!

you can config it to

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Ugh No Inssider is too complicated, I NEED find another software. Show signal %. Nothing more. nothing else.

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RSSI = received signal strength indication. All you have to do is look at the RSSI. Don't know of anything that shows it in just %.

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OK, I am sitting right next to my router, the signal strength should be around 100%, but the RSSI show like 40-50. WTF? So obviously it is NOT what I am looking for, I am looking for a software that show me 90-100% signal strength.

Where is a good software, simple and easy to look at just the % withOUT all that complication?

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The higher the RSSI number, the stronger the signal. The closer you get to NOT being in the negatives, the better the signal strength. -90 is terrible, -20 - 35 seems to be normal full strength. But if you're still wanting %, wait for some other suggestions I guess. I don't know of anything.

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Do you have to be so rude, people are trying to help you!

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I am not trying to be rude, I am just shocked and annoyed a software like this doesn't seem to exist :/

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doesn't mean you need to take it out on us....

also -32 RSSI is what I get 3 feet away from my NETGEAR WGR614. -30 is 100% pretty much,,,,

I got a printer and my purse in the way of it right now LOL... I get -40 2 rooms away and -45 to -55 downstairs

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doesn't mean you need to take it out on us....

also -32 RSSI is what I get 3 feet away from my NETGEAR WGR614. -30 is 100% pretty much,,,,

I got a printer and my purse in the way of it right now LOL... I get -40 2 rooms away and -45 to -55 downstairs

Well, I am sorry but I am not trying to be a network genius by understanding these #s in relation to the exact % that I am looking for.

Windows come with only bars, no signals %. ALL I am looking for is something show %, without getting TOO complicated like inSSIDer.

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well did you see if you can configure inSSIDer to your preferance....?

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Try these: http://www.ambitwire.com/wifisniffers.html

Netstumbler is one I'd recommend beside inSSIDer, which was already mentioned.

As for you being annoyed, most people are annoyed by rude people, so try doing a little homework yourself, and understand people are trying to help you. Give it some time and appreciate the fact you're getting any help. Also, being right next to your router doesn't mean much. I hardly ever see 100% on any wireless connection.

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I can't make inSSIDer to show %, and I downloaded Yahoo widget's WIFI sigal, it always show 100% even if i go very far from the router.

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Try out Wifi Meter if you want a "percentage" shown.

How does that work ? There is no Install proggy.

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How does that work ? There is no Install proggy.

I believe you add it to your Windows Gadget platform.

Edit: No, it's a Yahoo Widget

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Its a bit dated, but I don't think anything has really changed in what the topic is.

There specific paragraph about reporting wireless strength in % - which I doubt the OP will ever read. But for those that are interested in the different forms of representing wireless signal strength its a good read.

There are four units of measurement that are all used to represent RF signal strength. These are: mW (milliwatts), dBm (?db?-milliwatts), RSSI (Receive Signal Strength Indicator), and a percentage measurement. All of these measurements are related to each other, some more closely than others. It is possible to convert from one unit to another, albeit with varying degrees of accuracy, and not always in the extremes of the measurement range.

-- bit about % -- for those too lazy to read the full document

To circumvent the complexities (and potential inaccuracies) of using RSSI as a basis for reporting dBm signal strength, it is common to see signal strength represented as a percentage. The percentage represents the RSSI for a particular packet divided by the RSSI_Max value (multiplied by 100 to derive a percentage). Hence, a 50% signal strength with a Symbol card would convert to an RSSI of 16 (because their RSSI_Max = 31). Atheros, with RSSI_Max=60, would have RSSI=30 at 50% signal strength.

Cisco ends up making life easy with an RSSI_Max =100, so 50% is RSSI=50. It can be seen that use of a percentage for signal strength provides a reasonable metric for use in network analysis and site survey work. If signal strength is 100%, that?s great! When signal strength falls to roughly 20%, you?re going to reach the Roaming Threshold. Ultimately, when signal strength is down somewhere below 10% (and probably closer to 1%), the channel is going to be assumed to be clear.

This conceptualization obviates the need to consider dBm, the RSSI_Max, or the ?knee? in the logarithmic curve of mW to dBm conversion. It allows a reasonable comparison between environments even though different vendor?s NICs were used to make the measurements. Ultimately, the generalized nature of a percentage measurement allows the integer nature of the RSSI to be overlooked.

---

Enjoy

Converting_Signal_Strength.pdf

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