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1TB SSDs?

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#1 Fahim S.

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 23:37

Where are the 1TB SSDs. In the UK you can now pick up a decent 512GB SSD for around £300-£350, so I would have thought that 1TB SSDs would have started to become more common...

But besides the OCZ Octane (at circa £2000) and Kingmax (apparently sub £1000 in Japan but not available in the UK), there doesn't seem to be any...

Any ideas as to why this might be?


#2 srbeen

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 23:48

Its likely because 1000GB of solid state memory in a 2.5" form is hard to achieve reliability with current technology...
you would essentially have to half the size of all your components to double the storage, so you would need to print the chips twice as fine as currently printed. This technology exists but the ROI isn't as great as doing a ton of smaller, cheaper, higher profit margin reliable drives. Obviously if something is half the size its twice as fragile, and with electronics its likely to have heat dissipation issues.

#3 Javik

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 23:49

At the moment most SSD's are much thinner than mechanical hard disks, it's a wonder they simply haven't started adding more PCB's to them.

#4 OP Fahim S.

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 23:51

Really - I wouldn't have thought 16 64GB chips would be too much of a stretch to engineer into an SSD?

#5 +Phouchg

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 00:00

Revodrive X2 960 GB goes around £1K. Being PCI-e it has certain compatibility issues and issues in general, though.
Discard this. That's one weird Amazon offer that has spread across all those stupid aggregator sites.

#6 ITOps

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 00:32

If you really do want a 1GB SSD, they are available from Newegg.

One reason for the cost is probably due to the low demand for the storage amount, once demand gets higher, the manufacturing process gets more streamlined and the technology evolves more then the price per GB will decrease.

#7 +Majesticmerc

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 00:36

If you really do want a 1GB SSD, they are available from Newegg.

One reason for the cost is probably due to the low demand for the storage amount, once demand gets higher, the manufacturing process gets more streamlined and the technology evolves more then the price per GB will decrease.


$2700US?!?! 2 x 512GB it is then :rofl:

#8 ITOps

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 01:24

Oppps forgot 1TB :). I've been waiting for larger storage capacities at a lower price for SSDs too. My guess is the price will be around $100 to $200 for 1TB SSD drives with hard drive disks being in capacities of 10TB to 50TB or possibly more by that time since we are already at 4TB or higher now. We might get lucky and the transfer speed may also double by then too.

#9 Descartes

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 01:32

Are they reliable enough to be used as data storage, compared to traiditional hard disks?

For what I know, they used to have a very limited lifetime... not sure about now, thus the question.

#10 +LogicalApex

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 01:33

Are they reliable enough to be used as data storage, compared to traiditional hard disks?

For what I know, they used to have a very limited lifetime... not sure about now, thus the question.


I'm not sure they are there yet in a storage and archival sense, but they are fine for transient data. Either way, backups are always in order.

#11 sagum

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 01:52

Are they reliable enough to be used as data storage, compared to traiditional hard disks?

For what I know, they used to have a very limited lifetime... not sure about now, thus the question.


Unless you need and know why you need to use them as a storage, the chances are you don't.
As for reliability, unless you're writing across the drive continually current spec SSD drives have a very good life.

http://www.ocztechno...ii-2-5-ssd.html offers 2 million hours run time before it fails.

#12 OP Fahim S.

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:36

$2700US?!?! 2 x 512GB it is then :rofl:


Well - that was kind of my point. I'd understand if they carried a 10% premium over 2x512GB, but 400% is a little too much for my liking.


Unless you need and know why you need to use them as a storage, the chances are you don't.
As for reliability, unless you're writing across the drive continually current spec SSD drives have a very good life.

http://www.ocztechno...ii-2-5-ssd.html offers 2 million hours run time before it fails.


2 million hours mean time before failure - this is a marketing expression and a meaningless number. I can guarantee you, OCZ have not had one of these running for 2 million hours (as it's 228 years)

#13 Azusa

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:40

At the moment most SSD's are much thinner than mechanical hard disks, it's a wonder they simply haven't started adding more PCB's to them.


Yeah I'm also kinda shocked no one has made some sort of adaptor that fits two drives.

#14 OP Fahim S.

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:43

Yeah I'm also kinda shocked no one has made some sort of adaptor that fits two drives.


These do exist...
http://www.scan.co.u...-raid-converter

#15 ShadowPHP

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:45

Where are the 1TB SSDs. In the UK you can now pick up a decent 512GB SSD for around £300-£350, so I would have thought that 1TB SSDs would have started to become more common...

But besides the OCZ Octane (at circa £2000) and Kingmax (apparently sub £1000 in Japan but not available in the UK), there doesn't seem to be any...

Any ideas as to why this might be?


Take a read of this to explain the current absense (mostly) of 1TB SSD's:
http://www.anandtech...side-25-chassis