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Questions 'bout Linux...

software for linux

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#1 Rockrz

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 05:56

Currently using Win 7 Pro 64bit.... but have entertained the idea of playing with Linux to learn more about it.

My main intention is to explore the possibility of using it as a business computer... so are there alot of
programs out there that work as well as what is available on Windows?

I've always heard Linux didn't have alot of business based progs, but seems like that should be
changing now, right?

Is there a list of business programs available for Linux somewhere that rates each prog
with maybe some user reviews for each. That'd be helpful to help me educate myself on Linux.

Eventually, I'll just throw another hard drive in my box to boot from when going in to Linux
so I can do some testing in real time by actually using it. Is Ubunta the best way to go?

Any thoughts you guys may have to help my Linux education would be appreciated.


#2 redvamp128

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 06:04

Well with Ubuntu- There is the easy option of using WUBI - which is a "true" install running on your hardware. This version does not overwrite the boot record , but runs inside a folder on your drive inside a compressed image.
I would suggest that method - due to the fact that it does not overwrite your boot record.
This also has the removal through the Windows add or remove (programs and features) uninstall method.

You should give it a try first- Then once you are in then you can look at the package manager to see other things that can be installed.

#3 Haggis

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 12:11

what sort of business apps?

database
account
word processing
spreadsheets?

#4 HawkMan

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 12:46

run it in VMWare payer or VirtualBox first.

#5 +Majesticmerc

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 13:06

Like Hawkman said, if you want to try it out, download a copy of Ubuntu, and then Install Virtualbox. Then try playing around with it inside a sandboxed environment. If after a while you find that you're not enjoying using Linux, simply delete the Virtual machine. Saves you having to deal with Dual booting or any of that. :)

With regards to applications, there are a lot of business-style applications available. LibreOffice offers spreadsheet and databasing capabilities. If you need more advanced databasing there are plenty of large-scale database applications that run on Linux (e.g. SQLite, etc). For media there's a wealth of media players out there (VLC, etc).

There's also the possibility of running your Windows applications on Linux using WINE, although in many cases you might not get them to work completely (see the Wine Application Database to know how well applications worked for other people).

#6 Mindovermaster

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 15:26

Why does no one use a Boot-CD anymore? Try it full fledged with your actual hardware, not emulated hardware, before you install it.

#7 HawkMan

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 16:15

Virtual hardware, not emulated. And because a virtual machine allows you to use your computer as you woudl normally, while still testing linux fully as you would with a boot CD,

#8 Mindovermaster

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 16:59

In my thinking, virtual and emulate are the same thing.

I have to disagree, though. To try it, in get used to it, yes it's great, but to use more advanced applications, VM is not your best option.

#9 OP Rockrz

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 17:09

I'd really rather run it on it's own hard drive since I can set things up where my computer will boot up normally (to my current OS) and I'd have to manually make it boot to the drive running Linux. This way, I can work with it hands on... and if it works out, I can eventually use that drive as my main OS and make my computer boot to that first.

If it didn't work out and I didn't want to continue, then that drive can easily be formatted and used as an external so it's no big deal as far as cost is concerned. I'll just have the government subisdize the experiment by writing the drive off my taxes since it is a business expense. :D

I would need to be able to do any and all things I can do with Windows as far as business apps are concerned. I'm just a general user of MS Office, and I know about Open Office which should run on Linux, and I do some graphics work, some audio work, some web design work.

Linux isn't going to be too different from Windows, is it? Is it faster than Win 7 64 bit? Not a deal braker, but quicker response times is always better, although eventually I'm going to get an SSD so that should speed up response times no matter which OS I'm using.

I figured I'd load it, and then start looking for programs to use to imitate all the progs I'm currently using on Win 7.

#10 farmeunit

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 17:15

In my thinking, virtual and emulate are the same thing.

I have to disagree, though. To try it, in get used to it, yes it's great, but to use more advanced applications, VM is not your best option.


You are correct, but it give you better performance than a LiveCD, so you'll get a little better overall picture. As mentioned WUBI would be a good option, but Virtualbox is a good middle ground .

#11 OP Rockrz

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 17:24

Here's another good question... I've used Acronis True Image extensively for about 8 years now to backup my OS.... does anyone know if Acronic works with Linux?

#12 +Majesticmerc

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 18:21

In my thinking, virtual and emulate are the same thing.

I have to disagree, though. To try it, in get used to it, yes it's great, but to use more advanced applications, VM is not your best option.


A couple of reasons why I think a VM is better:
  • You get to go through the install process, which is important if you're looking to install a distro on your disk long-term IMO. It saves you the embarrassment of getting half way through the install and suddenly realising you don't know what you're doing.
  • Persistence between sessions. Unless you're writing to your Windows partition on the live CD, you can't save your files. VM's allow you to do this, with the added benefit that if/when you choose to install proper, any settings you created in the VM can be copied over onto the full install.


#13 +Majesticmerc

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 18:46

Here's another good question... I've used Acronis True Image extensively for about 8 years now to backup my OS.... does anyone know if Acronic works with Linux?


It doesn't, but if you're dual booting you can do images of Linux partitions (EXT, some others). Depending on what distro you download, there are alternatives available that can do it for you in Linux, although I don't know how good they are.

#14 OP Rockrz

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 18:54

OK, at least there are ways to do the same thing.

It's funny, I recently found a free version of Acronis on Western Digital's website at
http://support.wdc.c...il.asp?swid=119

Not sure why Acronis would allow this since there's no need
to actually buy their program now...

Glad I found that because now if I have opportunity to help
someone with their computer, I can turn them on to this
program without them having to buy it.

#15 +Majesticmerc

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Posted 24 November 2012 - 18:58

OK, at least there are ways to do the same thing.

It's funny, I recently found a free version of Acronis on Western Digital's website at
http://support.wdc.c...il.asp?swid=119

Not sure why Acronis would allow this since there's no need
to actually buy their program now...

Glad I found that because now if I have opportunity to help
someone with their computer, I can turn them on to this
program without them having to buy it.


You'll probably find that it's restricted to people who have WD hard disks.