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PC To Beat Consoles In Game Sales By 2014

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#46 OP Muhammad Farrukh

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 10:06

Its amazing to see, what a $500 PC can do with Battlefield 3 and the likes, at Ultra 1080p


#47 Tha Bloo Monkee

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 10:26

Of course Nvidia (who makes PC graphics cards) would "predict" that PC game sales would rise. What a biased source.

Sure, PC graphics are better and more up to date, but not everyone wants to buy a new graphics card every year.

And for the most part, controller is superior to keyboards. Like seriously, keyboards were not meant for gaming. It was meant for writing text.

#48 Yusuf M.

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 10:56

:blink: You're kidding right? I lucked into a very good deal on my current video card, but a comparable one at the moment would cost me about 3/4 of what I paid for my PS3. I've looked at quite a few video card upgrades recently and it is far more expensive than I remember... my first self-build had an (at the time) awesome video card that cost "just" £130 and lasted me a good 3 years of "maxed" graphics in games and another 2 of "high" to "medium". And back then the gulf between console and PC graphics was far larger than it is now, IMHO.

No, I'm not kidding. I paid over $1200 for my gaming PC back in 2007. Right now, I could build a decent one for $800. It's a mixture of better prices and better performance. It allows you to settle for less but still have better performance than a year ago. Everything from monitors to CPUs to video cards are cheaper today than say, 2009. I remember paying almost $300 for my 22" Acer monitor. Nowadays, you can get a 24" monitor for as little as $150.

That isn't any different on the PC. Activision still want £40 for Blacks Ops on Steam and £20 for MW, while physical copies seem to roughly match the console prices. The issue is a certain greedy developer.

You're right. The Call of Duty series was a bad example because Activision is known to keep their prices high for years. Fortunately, other PC games are discounted relatively quickly. The various sales on Steam are a good example of this.

Hardware prices are lower? They're roughly the same from what I can tell. 6 years ago, I spent $130 for a graphics card. Before that card, I had spent maybe $90. All that's changed is the advancement of technology really. The prices aren't exactly lower. All of my PCs over the years have done quite well with $450 put into each machine, and they function as full blown computers, not as just a game console or gameconsole+half-baked-pc. Some might consider this pricey compared to a console, but there are obvious reasons for that. And spending $300 on cheap desktop tower probably isn't going to yield the best results. Never really has, from what I've seen...

Modding isn't exactly making a comeback, as that'd imply it died down somehow. It's always been popular, depending on the game and what the developers did to provide them tools for modification or even simply reducing restrictions to game modification. What we're seeing now though is the full embrace as Valve's Steam Workshop comes into play. I'm hoping Rockstar can strike a deal with them too, as I'm sure they could do wonders with GTAV and pushing profits/sales to a greater level.

But yeah, it's really a good time to be a PC gamer right now. I've always been rather curious though, as how a company like Microsoft renown for being THE software company for PCs... fails so hard at getting their games on the PC or even a good distribution system for that matter... (Sorry if anyone's a fan of Games for Windows Live...) I mean, I'm not complaining, I can totally live without Microsoft's involvement, but it always had me curious.

Yes, they're lower. As I stated above, you can buy cheaper hardware that's good enough for gaming. You don't need to buy a high-end CPU and dual video cards. You can settle for something cheaper like the 2nd-gen Core i5s (which have very similar gaming performance to the Core i7s). Also, the launch prices for video cards with similar names haven't gone down (e.g. Radeon HD 6870 to Radeon HD 7870); however, performance has gone up with each new generation. For example, a medium-end video card from last year is this year's new low-end video card. I remember paying $400 + tax for my Radeon HD 2900 XT.

As for modding, "comeback" was the wrong word to use. I think a better word is "booming". The Steam Workshop is a great example of how a developer can embrace modding. Fans of games like Team Fortress 2 and Dota 2 have done a lot to add new hats, weapons, etc.

#49 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 10:57

And for the most part, controller is superior to keyboards. Like seriously, keyboards were not meant for gaming. It was meant for writing text.


Firstly, that's ridiculous. Secondly, PCs support controllers. In fact PC users can use the exact same controllers than consoles use - that includes the PS3, Wii and X360. Whereas console users can't use keyboard and mouse to control games, as it would give such players too much of an advantage. So congratulations on pointing out another limitation of console gaming.

#50 Tha Bloo Monkee

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 11:17

Whereas console users can't use keyboard and mouse to control games, as it would give such players too much of an advantage. So congratulations on pointing out another limitation of console gaming.

Wrong.
Here's one example:
http://www.tweaktown...ouse/index.html

Controller was designed exclusively for gaming; keyboard was not. You can't deny that fact.

#51 Buio

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 11:27

Of course Nvidia (who makes PC graphics cards) would "predict" that PC game sales would rise. What a biased source.

Sure, PC graphics are better and more up to date, but not everyone wants to buy a new graphics card every year.

And for the most part, controller is superior to keyboards. Like seriously, keyboards were not meant for gaming. It was meant for writing text.


PC game sales are not "predicted" to rise. They are increasing, and there are facts to prove that. Of course Nvidia likes to embellish, but that doesn't remove the fact that PC gaming is becoming more popular. Digital download services like Steam and others are expanding very fast. For example Gamersgate increased their revenue 50% in 2011.

PC gaming is more expensive and more complicated with potential problems. I have no problem with people that like consoles for easy access to gaming. Diversity is good.

I play a lot of games with other controllers on PC. And mouse+keyboard are really awesome for some type of games too.

#52 LUTZIFER

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 11:30

Well I'll stick to playing XBOX doing multiplayer with DualPlay glasses on, or playing games in 3D.
Personally I doubt PC games will ever beat Console games in sales.

#53 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 11:49

Wrong.
Here's one example:
http://www.tweaktown...ouse/index.html


Wow, you managed to find one game and it was designed by a PC developer. Congratulations.

Controller was designed exclusively for gaming; keyboard was not. You can't deny that fact.


Designed for != Better

If you want to keep pretending that controllers are better then go ahead but PC users are able to choose the control system they want and they overwhelmingly opt for KB&M in most games.

#54 Yusuf M.

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 15:55

It'll be interesting to see if the growth decreases once the next-gen consoles are released. I imagine it would decrease a little bit and slowly makes it way up as the next-gen console hardware ages.

Wrong.
Here's one example:
http://www.tweaktown...ouse/index.html

Controller was designed exclusively for gaming; keyboard was not. You can't deny that fact.

Are you implying that because a controller was designed for gaming, it's better than a keyboard (and mouse)? If so, then you're wrong. A mouse and keyboard is undeniably better than a controller for first-person shooters and real-time strategy games.

#55 theyarecomingforyou

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 16:04

Are you implying that because a controller was designed for gaming, it's better than a keyboard (and mouse)? If so, then you're wrong. A mouse and keyboard is undeniably better than a controller for first-person shooters and real-time strategy games.


And any game that involves messaging, like first-person shooters or MMOs. Typing a message on a controller is so torturous that I've heard it's been approved for use by the CIA.

#56 Yusuf M.

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 16:11

And any game that involves messaging, like first-person shooters or MMOs. Typing a message on a controller is so torturous that I've heard it's been approved for use by the CIA.

That's one thing that annoyed the heck out of me with my Xbox 360. After a short while, I resorted to replying on Xbox.com or with a voice recording.

#57 cropcircles

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 16:18

I think all this chart shows us is 2 things, current gen consoles are old, when it takes a cheaper midrange card to play the PC ports of the console games and have it look better then that plays into it. The 2nd thing is that we're seeing the casuals playing more on their new shinny mobile devices which tend to count as a PC. I think once we get the new consoles in late 2013 or so, with the updated graphics and new abilities to do more outside of gaming that the chart will once gain swing the other way.

As good as the PC is when it comes to performance and overall graphics quality it still tends to be a pain to just enjoy a game with little or no issue. I'd take the ability to just pop-in a disc and start playing a new game right away without much hassle and know that it'll run well without having to tweak settings etc over, in some cases, crazy long install times and often buggy releases that need at least a pair of patches before the game can run fine. Not everyone has the same setup so some don't have the issues as others do but we've all at least once ran into a PC game that's just a mess to try and play. Not to mention when you start talking drivers and the issues those can have.


Good point about tweaking your PC to get the best performance. It does take a little time but I like being able to tweak my PC, unfortunately you can't tweak consoles and you get what you get. Some PC games that come out can be a major pain in the rear with glitches and then waiting for patches.

It'll be interesting to see if the growth decreases once the next-gen consoles are released. I imagine it would decrease a little bit and slowly makes it way up as the next-gen console hardware ages.


Are you implying that because a controller was designed for gaming, it's better than a keyboard (and mouse)? If so, then you're wrong. A mouse and keyboard is undeniably better than a controller for first-person shooters and real-time strategy games.


Agreed with the keyboard and mouse for first-person shooters although I do use my Xbox 360 controller allot when playing PC games especially racing games for sure. I still struggle getting a quick scope reticle on target using the 360 controller but with the mouse I'm on it real quick.

#58 LaP

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 18:07

My personal failure rate with consoles is far higher than with PC hardware. In fact the most recent console I've owned that didn't suffer some form of hardware failure was the Sega Dreamcast.


My personal failure rate with console was 0 before the 360.

My old NES still work.
My old SNES still work.
My old Playstation died but it died long after i bought my XBox.
My GC was still working when i sold it to buy a 360.
My XBox was still working when i sold it to buy a 360
My GBA is still working.

My XBox 360 ... well i got it repaired twice so i'm on my 3rd XBox 360 so far.


I RMAed 2 video card ever. A 8800gts and a 1800XL. But i change my video card every 2 years so ...

Historically i think PC are more prone to failure than consoles are. But this gen is different. The 360 is definately at the least as much prone to failure than a PC if not more. Everyone i know got their XBox 360 repaired at least once.

The driver problem on PC is definately not as bad as people say it is. I update my drivers usually once every 6 or 8 months. Basically if it's not broken don't fix it. If the game is working and it's smooth i'm not updating. The last time i had a serious drivers problem was a long time ago. Some people really live in the past when it comes to PC gaming. These days if you use Steam games are automatically updated silently by steam. Steam can even update AMD drivers. Did not test it since i own a nVidia card curently. Not sure but as far as i know nVidia drivers automatically and silently update games profile too. So basically you don't need to update the drivers themselves every month.

PC gaming has come a long way to make it easier for casual. Steam is a great platform.

#59 dead.cell

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Posted 09 December 2012 - 19:11

No, I'm not kidding. I paid over $1200 for my gaming PC back in 2007. Right now, I could build a decent one for $800. It's a mixture of better prices and better performance. It allows you to settle for less but still have better performance than a year ago. Everything from monitors to CPUs to video cards are cheaper today than say, 2009. I remember paying almost $300 for my 22" Acer monitor. Nowadays, you can get a 24" monitor for as little as $150.

Yes, they're lower. As I stated above, you can buy cheaper hardware that's good enough for gaming. You don't need to buy a high-end CPU and dual video cards. You can settle for something cheaper like the 2nd-gen Core i5s (which have very similar gaming performance to the Core i7s). Also, the launch prices for video cards with similar names haven't gone down (e.g. Radeon HD 6870 to Radeon HD 7870); however, performance has gone up with each new generation. For example, a medium-end video card from last year is this year's new low-end video card. I remember paying $400 + tax for my Radeon HD 2900 XT.

As for modding, "comeback" was the wrong word to use. I think a better word is "booming". The Steam Workshop is a great example of how a developer can embrace modding. Fans of games like Team Fortress 2 and Dota 2 have done a lot to add new hats, weapons, etc.


Perhaps our definition of gaming rigs are different. I've never spent more than $500 on a gaming machine. Back then, when I first switched from nVidia to ATi, I had myself a Radeon 9600 playing Halo and Morrowind. I never felt behind in gaming, and that stuff I built back around 2004ish I believe. Then I discovered World of Warcraft. I guess it's all a matter on how well you want to run the games, but I've never had issues with framerate...

Hell, around 2008-2009, I bought this computer with an AMD Athlon 64 x2 processor. The only game I ever had issue playing was GTAIV, which was due to the fact that it was processor heavy. Still, I managed 20-25fps or so and beat the hell out of the game. Upgraded to an AMD Phenom II x4 just for Guild Wars 2 since it wasn't optimized well enough for the GPU, being CPU heavy too. Between that and an nVidia 9800GT, I'm very capable of even running Battlefield 3 smoothly, zero hiccups. Sure, I don't have everything maxed out, but I do have things like AA on and such. It also looks many times better than what you'd see on a game console too, with a butter-smooth framerate.

I've always been the "bang-for-the-buck" kind of guy though. No one has to spend $800 on a computer. That's utterly ridiculous, unless you work full time with a decent job. I'm just a broke college student right now, working part time. I guess my point here is I've never felt "left out" in the gaming world, nor that my rig was ever crappy. Every game I run is on a 1680x1050 resolution too. :)

#60 vetFourjays

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Posted 10 December 2012 - 10:27

No, I'm not kidding. I paid over $1200 for my gaming PC back in 2007. Right now, I could build a decent one for $800. It's a mixture of better prices and better performance. It allows you to settle for less but still have better performance than a year ago. Everything from monitors to CPUs to video cards are cheaper today than say, 2009. I remember paying almost $300 for my 22" Acer monitor. Nowadays, you can get a 24" monitor for as little as $150.

Must be fortunate with pricing over there, because here an entry-level Core i5 is still £150, an entry-level full-ATX motherboard is still around £80-£100 and video cards start at £80 unless you want something barely any better than integrated graphics (these are of course the newer versions now, with the older ones no longer available). To go further back, a Pentium Dual Core from 2008/9 cost me £80-£90 at the time and the newest one available costs £75 now, while the entry-level Core i3 (that I'd presume is supposed to replace the Pentium DCs now) is at £90. You could say that you get more bang for your buck (when hasn't this been the case?), but the prices aren't really any lower here.

The biggest thing holding PC gaming back though IMO has been, and will probably continue to be, the elitist attitude. I know it doesn't apply to all PC gamers, but my impression (even when I was one myself) has always been that they don't appreciate the amount of effort it takes to develop a game and instead moan about "problems" that are largely created by themselves. Theyarecomingforyou alluded to this kind of issue in the Far Cry 3 thread.