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Overclocking my Eyes


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#1 Crisp

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:00

I read somewhere that the average human has a frame rate of 80 ish FPS. So I'm wondering, is it possible to overclock my eyes to get a higher FPS?

I've tried to focus on something spinning in a washing machine, but as soon as the RPM's get high it just becomes a blur. Being biological maybe there's a way to train the brain / eyes into higher frame rates.

And also, is there some kind of benchmarking tool out there I can use to measure my current FPS?

I would like to OC in the region of around 120+ FPS.


#2 Aheer.R.S.

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:03

80?
I thought it was much lower than that, I'm not sure about increasing fps in a human eyeball, but there are ways to train the eye to see better in the periferal scopes

#3 Xahid

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:16

I guess it depends on diet & giving your eyes proper rest rather then watching the spinning wheel, it can cause eyes pain?
I heard carrot is good for eye sight so eat & drink carrot juice a lot :)

#4 Teebor

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:19

It is much lower, its somewhere around 30 fps iirc (can't remember the exact figure)

that is why when you pump out more FPS on your PC it only makes the game look a little bit smoother and why films are usually shown at around 35fps

And no I don't believe you can "overclock" your eyes, even if you could there are other more pressing design faults with the human eye that you would probably want to address before hand

#5 +jamesyfx

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:22

I'm sure if you take psychedelic or euphoric drugs it will give you the illusion that things are moving at different rates. :rofl:

#6 -Himanshu-

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:27

It is much lower, its somewhere around 30 fps iirc (can't remember the exact figure)

that is why when you pump out more FPS on your PC it only makes the game look a little bit smoother and why films are usually shown at around 35fps

And no I don't believe you can "overclock" your eyes, even if you could there are other more pressing design faults with the human eye that you would probably want to address before hand


Films are 24 FPS, no?

#7 Warboy

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:30

It is much lower, its somewhere around 30 fps iirc (can't remember the exact figure)

that is why when you pump out more FPS on your PC it only makes the game look a little bit smoother and why films are usually shown at around 35fps

And no I don't believe you can "overclock" your eyes, even if you could there are other more pressing design faults with the human eye that you would probably want to address before hand


Thats myth, not fact. Human eyes can view between 80-120fps just fine. Most people can see dips below 60/70 fps and notice it.

Films are only 24fps because they're not moving as fast as games, even in action based heavy hitters. The hobbit was filmed at 48fps.

#8 BGM

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:40

I read somewhere that the average human has a frame rate of 80 ish FPS. So I'm wondering, is it possible to overclock my eyes to get a higher FPS?

I've tried to focus on something spinning in a washing machine, but as soon as the RPM's get high it just becomes a blur. Being biological maybe there's a way to train the brain / eyes into higher frame rates.

And also, is there some kind of benchmarking tool out there I can use to measure my current FPS?

I would like to OC in the region of around 120+ FPS.


can't tell if serious or not...

i think my physics teacher back in secondary school said it was something like 60Htz.. but a brief bit of research on the web suggests 100Htz upper limit on discernible difference.

meh

#9 MarkusDarkus

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 09:49

Thats myth, not fact. Human eyes can view between 80-120fps just fine. Most people can see dips below 60/70 fps and notice it.

Films are only 24fps because they're not moving as fast as games, even in action based heavy hitters. The hobbit was filmed at 48fps.


lool the eyes don't see in FPS. It's a continuous fluid motion as the eye aperture is always open. You could go either way if you wanted a numeric answer though. You could go by how often the average person blinks which averages between 4 - 12 times a minute. Other than that you would look at the brain but the brain has the ability to discern they say up to and around 100FPS but the brain does a lot of extra processing, composing from 2 images and assumption of the data from the eyes because it's too 'lazy' for it to process raw. From about 25FPS the brain goes 'screw this, I'm just going to assume it's one fluid motion'. It puts less strain on the brain I suppose it's like mpeg compression. Information gets lost but you can still see enough to know what you are looking at.

I would say if you wanted to overclock your eyes, you cannot. But you could possibly overclock your brain to be able to reach a higher 'FPS' if I were to use that term.

#10 +Nik L

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 10:07

I read somewhere that the average human has a frame rate of 80 ish FPS

You read wrong, as has everyone else in this thread quoting FPS.

We can only distinguish about 35 FPS, but we don't see in "frames per second". We are not digital. Our eyes don't tun on and off. We see continuously, in a fluid manner!

So if anything, it's your brain that would need "overclocking", as that is what is responsible for detecting the changes.

#11 XerXis

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 10:14

And a lot of people are making the mistake of confusing the necessary fps to see something as a fluid motion (around 24-30) with the ability of the human eye to see flickering which is much higher and depends a lot on the contrast. For example most people would be able to distinguish one white frame if played between a lot of black frames at 250hz

#12 OP Crisp

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 19:17

So robots have frame rate eyes?

Why can't they develop a "fluid" monitor which has no FPS. I wonder if in the future we can get drugs to incread brain pulses to OC eyes.

#13 Draconian Guppy

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 19:23

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#14 Detection

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 19:25

It is much lower, its somewhere around 30 fps iirc (can't remember the exact figure)

that is why when you pump out more FPS on your PC it only makes the game look a little bit smoother and why films are usually shown at around 35fps

And no I don't believe you can "overclock" your eyes, even if you could there are other more pressing design faults with the human eye that you would probably want to address before hand


30 fps is what I heard too, although its easy to see the difference between a game running at 30fps vs 60fps, to be able to see each frame individually I think its 30

#15 n_K

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 19:29

Human eyes don't see in FPS they seen in perception of vision due to how the cones and rods in the back of the eye are triggered.
No you cannot 'overclock' your eyes, they are fired at set speeds like all the body's electrical signals are.