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Overclocking my Eyes

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Posted

I read somewhere that the average human has a frame rate of 80 ish FPS. So I'm wondering, is it possible to overclock my eyes to get a higher FPS?

I've tried to focus on something spinning in a washing machine, but as soon as the RPM's get high it just becomes a blur. Being biological maybe there's a way to train the brain / eyes into higher frame rates.

And also, is there some kind of benchmarking tool out there I can use to measure my current FPS?

I would like to OC in the region of around 120+ FPS.

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Posted

80?
I thought it was much lower than that, I'm not sure about increasing fps in a human eyeball, but there are ways to train the eye to see better in the periferal scopes

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Posted

I guess it depends on diet & giving your eyes proper rest rather then watching the spinning wheel, it can cause eyes pain?
I heard carrot is good for eye sight so eat & drink carrot juice a lot :)

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Posted

It is much lower, its somewhere around 30 fps iirc (can't remember the exact figure)

that is why when you pump out more FPS on your PC it only makes the game look a little bit smoother and why films are usually shown at around 35fps

And no I don't believe you can "overclock" your eyes, even if you could there are other more pressing design faults with the human eye that you would probably want to address before hand

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Posted

I'm sure if you take psychedelic or euphoric drugs it will give you the illusion that things are moving at different rates. :rofl:
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Posted

[quote name='Teebor' timestamp='1355822359' post='595400344']
It is much lower, its somewhere around 30 fps iirc (can't remember the exact figure)

that is why when you pump out more FPS on your PC it only makes the game look a little bit smoother and why films are usually shown at around 35fps

And no I don't believe you can "overclock" your eyes, even if you could there are other more pressing design faults with the human eye that you would probably want to address before hand
[/quote]

Films are 24 FPS, no?

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Posted

[quote name='Teebor' timestamp='1355822359' post='595400344']
It is much lower, its somewhere around 30 fps iirc (can't remember the exact figure)

that is why when you pump out more FPS on your PC it only makes the game look a little bit smoother and why films are usually shown at around 35fps

And no I don't believe you can "overclock" your eyes, even if you could there are other more pressing design faults with the human eye that you would probably want to address before hand
[/quote]

Thats myth, not fact. Human eyes can view between 80-120fps just fine. Most people can see dips below 60/70 fps and notice it.

Films are only 24fps because they're not moving as fast as games, even in action based heavy hitters. The hobbit was filmed at 48fps.
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Posted

[quote name='Crisp' timestamp='1355821229' post='595400328']
I read somewhere that the average human has a frame rate of 80 ish FPS. So I'm wondering, is it possible to overclock my eyes to get a higher FPS?

I've tried to focus on something spinning in a washing machine, but as soon as the RPM's get high it just becomes a blur. Being biological maybe there's a way to train the brain / eyes into higher frame rates.

And also, is there some kind of benchmarking tool out there I can use to measure my current FPS?

I would like to OC in the region of around 120+ FPS.
[/quote]

can't tell if serious or not...

i think my physics teacher back in secondary school said it was something like 60Htz.. but a brief bit of research on the web suggests 100Htz upper limit on discernible difference.

meh
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Posted

[quote name='Warboy' timestamp='1355823028' post='595400352']
Thats myth, not fact. Human eyes can view between 80-120fps just fine. Most people can see dips below 60/70 fps and notice it.

Films are only 24fps because they're not moving as fast as games, even in action based heavy hitters. The hobbit was filmed at 48fps.
[/quote]

lool the eyes don't see in FPS. It's a continuous fluid motion as the eye aperture is always open. You could go either way if you wanted a numeric answer though. You could go by how often the average person blinks which averages between 4 - 12 times a minute. Other than that you would look at the brain but the brain has the ability to discern they say up to and around 100FPS but the brain does a lot of extra processing, composing from 2 images and assumption of the data from the eyes because it's too 'lazy' for it to process raw. From about 25FPS the brain goes 'screw this, I'm just going to assume it's one fluid motion'. It puts less strain on the brain I suppose it's like mpeg compression. Information gets lost but you can still see enough to know what you are looking at.

I would say if you wanted to overclock your eyes, you cannot. But you could possibly overclock your brain to be able to reach a higher 'FPS' if I were to use that term.

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Posted

[quote]
I read somewhere that the average human has a frame rate of 80 ish FPS
[/quote]
You read wrong, as has everyone else in this thread quoting FPS.

We can only distinguish about 35 FPS, but we don't see in "frames per second". We are not digital. Our eyes don't tun on and off. We see continuously, in a fluid manner!

So if anything, it's your brain that would need "overclocking", as that is what is responsible for detecting the changes.
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Posted

And a lot of people are making the mistake of confusing the necessary fps to see something as a fluid motion (around 24-30) with the ability of the human eye to see flickering which is much higher and depends a lot on the contrast. For example most people would be able to distinguish one white frame if played between a lot of black frames at 250hz

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Posted

So robots have frame rate eyes?

Why can't they develop a "fluid" monitor which has no FPS. I wonder if in the future we can get drugs to incread brain pulses to OC eyes.

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Posted

[img]http://www.lnt.com/photos/product/standard/6156980S7991/humor/what-are-you-smoking-funny-tin-sign.jpg[/img]
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Posted

[quote name='Teebor' timestamp='1355822359' post='595400344']
It is much lower, its somewhere around 30 fps iirc (can't remember the exact figure)

that is why when you pump out more FPS on your PC it only makes the game look a little bit smoother and why films are usually shown at around 35fps

And no I don't believe you can "overclock" your eyes, even if you could there are other more pressing design faults with the human eye that you would probably want to address before hand
[/quote]

30 fps is what I heard too, although its easy to see the difference between a game running at 30fps vs 60fps, to be able to see each frame individually I think its 30

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Posted

Human eyes don't see in FPS they seen in perception of vision due to how the cones and rods in the back of the eye are triggered.
No you cannot 'overclock' your eyes, they are fired at set speeds like all the body's electrical signals are.
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Posted

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_frames_per_second_can_your_eyes_see

____

LOL! I wish you could overclock your self!

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Posted

[quote name='n_K' timestamp='1355858969' post='595401386']
Human eyes don't see in FPS they seen in perception of vision due to how the cones and rods in the back of the eye are triggered.
No you cannot 'overclock' your eyes, they are fired at set speeds like all the body's electrical signals are.
[/quote]

Fire them more often! Done!

FWIW, biologically, yes, there are definitely people out there whose brains do less "visual smoothing", such as a baseball player who can pick up the stitches on a thrown ball. I don't know about washing machine fast, but maybe spinning record fast.

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Posted

[quote name='Tyler R.' timestamp='1355859572' post='595401406']
[url="http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_frames_per_second_can_your_eyes_see"]http://wiki.answers....n_your_eyes_see[/url]

____

LOL! I wish you could overclock your self!
[/quote]

You can!

[url="http://flowstateengaged.com/"]http://flowstateengaged.com/[/url]


I'm buying one once they are released, in-fact was thinking about building one using the schematics
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Posted

Cybernetic implants might help. :p
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Posted

I was expecting this.

[url="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uef17zOCDb8"]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uef17zOCDb8[/url]

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Posted

If you can shorten your optic nerve and recalibrate your rods and cones to reset more quickly, then sure.

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Posted

[quote name='Warboy' timestamp='1355823028' post='595400352']
Thats myth, not fact. Human eyes can view between 80-120fps just fine. Most people can see dips below 60/70 fps and notice it.

Films are only 24fps because they're not moving as fast as games, even in action based heavy hitters. The hobbit was filmed at 48fps.
[/quote]

No eyes are around 24-30 ish.

HOWEVER, you will be able to see a difference between 30 and 60 fps. though it's not so much seeing it as it's perceiving it. this is simple due to the fact that ayes don't have a "shutter" perfectly defining a frame, and you will therefore desync with the frames on the TV, and because of motion blur. though, what you actually see as a difference between a 30 and 60FPS movie picture is that the 60 FPS one is sharper due to the shutter being twice as fast. When it comes to games the difference is easier to see since games don't have a shutter, but they perfectly capture the instance of movement 30 times a second, with not blur, this makes the pictures jump inside your eyes to since there's no movement in between the naturally motion blur the picture in your brain. Even in games with motion blur, the motion blur used in games is vector based cheating, and is easily detected by your brain and eyes even if you don't truly "see" it.

[quote name='Crisp' timestamp='1355858276' post='595401364']
So robots have frame rate eyes?

Why can't they develop a "fluid" monitor which has no FPS. I wonder if in the future we can get drugs to incread brain pulses to OC eyes.
[/quote]

a camera sensor is essentially operating in "fluid" motion, the shutter is applied either mechanically or electronically by flushing the buffer or taking a snapshot of the buffer. it's more of a software issue. however it's easier in the digital world to operate in frames.
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Posted

[quote name='Detection' timestamp='1355859705' post='595401410']
You can!

[url="http://flowstateengaged.com/"]http://flowstateengaged.com/[/url]


I'm buying one once they are released, in-fact was thinking about building one using the schematics
[/quote]

"...2.5x increase in learning rate..." That's really interesting. LOL! I want one, now! I signed up for their news letter and bookmarked their site. How much do you think they would go for? Your standard $19.99 or more than that?

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Posted

[quote name='n_K' timestamp='1355858969' post='595401386']
Human eyes don't see in FPS they seen in perception of vision due to how the cones and rods in the back of the eye are triggered.
No you cannot 'overclock' your eyes, they are fired at set speeds like all the body's electrical signals are.
[/quote]

But what if I could increase the voltage of these electical signals? If it worked, would I have to wear a heatsink to cool my brain?

[img]http://www.bbspot.com/Images/News_Features/2005/12/kid_cooler.jpg[/img] [url="http://www.bbspot.com/News/2005/12/cooling_your_kids.html"]Source[/url]

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Posted

I need new eyes i thought my GFX card was going bad as i was seeing the odd black spot on screen every 3 or 4 hours but then i saw one in the sky and on a piece of paper...
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