34 posts in this topic

Posted

[b][size=5]Ubuntu considers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Haven't been a fan of the distro on the desktop side for a few years now... but it's about f'ing time, the six month thing was a turnoff.
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Yeah, great thing imo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

It doesn't really bother me either way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

All Linux distros should do this,imo.
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='Syanide' timestamp='1358950611' post='595473106']
Why bother? Canonical kernel team manager Leann Ogasawara explained in a Google hangout today that this proposal is on the table because Canonical thinks it can deliver both stability and cutting-edge features with rolling releases.
[/quote]
Oh cahoot, does that mean thorough testing and coding of any changes they make before actually implementing them and forcing them on users, if so; microsoft, arch linux team, nokia, et al. please [b]take note[/b].

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

This could be a good idea, the 6 month release cycle has become pretty outdated IMO. The non-lts releases have always been glorified betas, so they might as well just go rolling release between the LTS releases. I really like the sound of this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I do not use Ubuntu so not the biggest concern but I enjoyed Arch when I tried it but went back to Gentoo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I really like this idea. I think it would totally work for them, and us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Could it ever truly be rolling if debian is not rolling?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='tim_s' timestamp='1358994160' post='595474760']Could it ever truly be rolling if debian is not rolling?[/quote]
Debian has (or at least had last time I messed with it) a rolling branch, unstable (Sid).
http://wiki.debian.org/DebianUnstable#Introduction

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

My apologies, I thought unstable was not rolling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Several distros like Bodhi Linux do a semi-rolling release where they update the software but only update the system when they get system updates from Ubuntu. They are based on 12.04.1 currently. I would be happy with something like that, with only security updates coming down the line.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Seems people are positive about the move - for a desktop this is awesome. Probably not enough to make me switch to Ubuntu but I like to see change.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='Growled' timestamp='1358994667' post='595474778']Several distros like Bodhi Linux do a semi-rolling release where they update the software but only update the system when they get system updates from Ubuntu. [/quote]
Yea Chakra's doing this too (via Arch).. the core system is released in 'stages' or however you want to word it, the applications themselves (stuff that won't kersplode your system) is rolling. Actually a pretty good setup I think.. system's stable yet you're constantly up to date with the "regular" software.. in theory the worst that'll happen is the one application will crash, no more "holy god what did I do" moments with an update. Arch had a few major doozies if you weren't paying attention to their news feeds and what the updater is doing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='tim_s' timestamp='1358994323' post='595474770']
My apologies, I thought unstable was not rolling.
[/quote]

You are actually correct. Sid is not rolling. It is never technically put into freeze like Testing before release, but since Unstable's main purpose is to act as a staging area for Testing, it is effectively frozen at the same time as Testing. Unstable may have slightly newer versions of some packages during a freeze, or even packages that were removed from Testing because they were deemed too unstable or buggy for release, but no major new software versions are introduced. (For example, GNOME 3.4 is in both Sid and Wheezy even though GNOME 3.6 is considered stable upstream.) Once Wheezy is released, Sid will be forked to become the basis for Jesse, then it will effectively be unfrozen.

There are actually several proposals to create a truly rolling branch of Debian that are often brought up around release time. The consensus, at the moment at least, seems to be that creating a rolling release would distract developers from fixing release-critical bugs - thus preventing Testing from being released in a timely manner - and generally reduce the quality of Debian as a whole.

Canonical might be able to pull off a rolling release of Ubuntu with some software that they maintain internally, such as Unity or the Linux kernel, but they don't have the resources to independently maintain every package in the Debian archive. I think that their "rolling release" will focus mainly on a few key packages that Canonical themselves maintain, and the remainder will be maintained by regular imports from Sid. Effectively, Ubuntu's rolling release will semi-freeze the same way Sid does, though possibly to a lesser extent, when Debian freezes Testing. The only practical way around that limitation would be for Debian to create a true rolling-release branch, which isn't likely to happen, or Canonical to re-base on another distribution, which is even less likely to happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Debian in my opinion has a slighty different Market to Ubuntu, "rolling release" and "stable" does not always go well hand in hand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='tim_s' timestamp='1358997204' post='595474842']
Debian in my opinion has a slighty different Market to Ubuntu, "rolling release" and "stable" does not always go well hand in hand.
[/quote]

I completely agree. I'm definitely against Debian adding a rolling-release repository. Fortunately, it seems that the vast majority of Debian Developers agree with me.

Canonical, on the other hand, might be able to pull it off. My last post might have made it sound a little like I'm against Ubuntu becoming a rolling distribution: I'm not. I merely pointed out some of the challenges they will face making that happen. That said, I'm sure they've thought it through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

I've seen some nods from the Fedora camp that they may move into rolling releases, or at least offer both stable releases and a rolling release. They currently have something like that (rawhide) but it's not an official rolling release.
Based on my experience with Arch on a pogoplug, rolling releases need to be improved a bit but there is a lot of promise there as long as they roll smoother than a square tire.

And I'd greatly like a more frequently updated DE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Now I based my information on distrowatch and I understand the time between today and the rolling release but it is my opinion that the stability / cutting edge mixture they have currently adopted (and usability) is what brought Ubuntu to the fore-front of popularity.

The Ubuntu distro losing popularity and I am sure many have opinions why - changing the release strategy might not be the move to reverse the path they are on.

Perhaps current adopters might have a fluctuation but the "windows" converts will be further distanced and for those who are looking for a "light" distro may leave.

This is a wild statement but I have always felt that Ubuntu provided the strengths of Linux without the feel and complexity.

This is not to say Ubuntu is limiting - clearly it can be used by hardcore / new comers a like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

To back step a little I missed the fact LTS releases will sexist but I would still expect on some level windows converts will be entangled with this concept of "most recent release" and the expectation of everything being close to perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

good idea imho. and in the meantime i just use fuduntu, as it is a rolling release plus combines the best of ubuntu and fedora.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='tim_s' timestamp='1358998815' post='595474870']
Now I based my information on distrowatch and I understand the time between today and the rolling release but it is my opinion that the stability / cutting edge mixture they have currently adopted (and usability) is what brought Ubuntu to the fore-front of popularity.

The Ubuntu distro losing popularity and I am sure many have opinions why - changing the release strategy might not be the move to reverse the path they are on.
[/quote]

I don't think Ubuntu cares about the desktop anymore. They are more focused on mobile now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Well, ever since the Ubuntu phones, yeah... :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

[quote name='Growled' timestamp='1359083520' post='595477780']
I don't think Ubuntu cares about the desktop anymore. They are more focused on mobile now.
[/quote]

To be fair Ubuntu has been looking to spread itself around in all sorts of already heavily dominated markets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.