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The Copyright Alert System

copyright alert system

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#1 1941

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 02:09

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSJ34E_09Ko

http://www.copyright...t-alert-system/

Today, there are many different ways to access digital entertainment like music, movies, TV shows, games and books. With so many options, it can be unclear what’s legal and what’s not.

Online copyright infringement (also called online piracy) has become a serious and growing problem. The Center for Copyright Information (CCI) was formed to educate consumers about the importance of copyright protection and to offer information about online copyright infringement. Our goal is to alleviate confusion and help Internet users find legal ways to enjoy the digital content they love.

Our members include artists and content creators like the members of the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) and Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) as well as independent filmmakers and record producers represented by the Independent Film and Television Alliance (IFTA) and the American Association of Independent Music (A2IM), and 5 major Internet service providers – AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner Cable, and Verizon. Our leadership also includes an Advisory Board made up of consumer advocates, privacy specialists and technology policy experts.
CCI Leadership

Controversial 6 strike anti-piracy system to roll out to most ISPs next week


Starting next week, most U.S. Internet users will be subject to a new copyright enforcement system that could slow the Internet to a crawl and force violators to take educational courses.

A source with direct knowledge of the Copyright Alert System (CAS), who asked not to be named, has told the Daily Dot that the five participating Internet service providers (ISPs) will start the controversial program Monday.

These include AT&T, Cablevision, Comcast, Time Warner, and Verizon with Comcast expected to be first Monday.

Take note that this is not designed to go after large scale pirates, many who are overseas, but instead goes after the casual user. This means you. It will issue escalating punishments reducing your connection speed after the 5th or 6th offense.

http://www.majorgeek...ry.php?id=37785


#2 Hum

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 02:15

Sounds like ISPs will lose many customers, and the RIAA, MPAA will not see any increase in profits.

#3 OP 1941

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:00

What got me upset over this is that they are not going after the large pirates of Software but "Joe Bag o Donuts" who lives down the street. A normal user of the internet whose friend may be sending him something over one of these IM networks and this guy may get caught while there are people in China and other places making millions. Smart-go after the little guy.

#4 goatsniffer

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:08

It's all about the money, not to ideal. You cannot sue Chinese pirates who sell copied content, but you can sue people in your own country and obtain money from them. Piracy won't stop but estimated losses will be recouped, which is what it's all about.

#5 ensiform

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:14

Right, so rather than adopting with the times and actually fixing your political bullcrap mess that is with legal content distribution methods with really terrible restrictions we have to come to this. (Yes I'm talking about you TV networks and your inability to provide access to on demand/online viewing day after airing)

#6 -Razorfold

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:22

Right, so rather than adopting with the times and actually fixing your political bullcrap mess that is with legal content distribution methods with really terrible restrictions we have to come to this. (Yes I'm talking about you TV networks and your inability to provide access to on demand/online viewing day after airing)

Of course not. Most of them have a monopoly and it's far too easy for them to get money anyways.

Why bother improving your service when most of the American public is happy (or they don't seem to give a crap) with being raped up the ass by their cable networks? And then you have the FCC who refuses to do anything about it thanks to lobbying and corporate interests.

Dish is like the only provider that seems to give a crap about their customers and look at what's happening to them. Cable networks are refusing to put their shows on dish because it cuts into their profits.

#7 ensiform

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:24

Of course not. Most of them have a monopoly and it's far too easy for them to get money anyways.

Why bother improving your service when most of the American public is happy (or they don't seem to give a crap) with being raped up the ass by their cable networks?


Exactly, the whole thing is politics & money but Jill Lesser won't actually admit that though.

#8 trag3dy

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:28

In before people getting sued for watching music videos on youtube.

#9 -Razorfold

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 03:30

Exactly, the whole thing is politics & money but Jill Lesser won't actually admit that though.

The MPAA and RIAA need to go. They're pathetic and all they do is hold back technology while shoving their pockets full of money.

Maybe if they actually learnt the benefits of programs like Netflix, Spotify, Zune and got with the times piracy would actually decrease.

#10 primexx

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 07:34

Is this voluntary for the ISPs?

#11 OP 1941

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 16:02

It's all about the money, not to ideal. You cannot sue Chinese pirates who sell copied content, but you can sue people in your own country and obtain money from them. Piracy won't stop but estimated losses will be recouped, which is what it's all about.


No but all of their IP's can be blocked.

#12 LaP

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 16:17

You know what is also a problem.

I want to have HBO to legally watch Game of Thrones.

You see the problem is to have HBO i need to have TMN instead of Super Écran. Problem is i'm the only one to watch TV in english. So it's not possible to switch Super Écran to TMN unless i want to give up on sex ... so it's impossible for me to get HBO and legally watch Game of Thrones.

So what ******* **** ******* option do i ******* have for *** ****.

****.

Those greedy ****** ******* ********. They want the butter and the money from it.

#13 OP 1941

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 16:25

Is this voluntary for the ISPs?


According to the source this is to "Educate" the consumer and make them aware of Copyright laws. With all of the crap going on in the world, they are doing this BS. My ISP is not on the list, but I feel like calling them and asking.

#14 +FiB3R

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 16:53

Posted Image

#15 +goretsky

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Posted 26 February 2013 - 09:34

Hello,

A slightly different point of view here:

I do not have cable TV (or satellite or fibre or som other paid-for delivery system). I do have broadband connections, but they are only for Internet usage (and, in some cases, telephone).

I do not use peer-to-peer file transfer networks to steal other companies intellectual property. I have a few programs (games) that use P2P mechanisms for updating themselves, but that's internal to the game client and does not involve any kind of copyright infringement.

If I want to watch something and it's not on Hulu, Vimeo or YouTube, I purchase the DVD or Blu-ray discs if I want to see it. For books and magazines, I can go to the bookstore and buy them, an online store like Amazon or Nook, or sometimes even directly to the publisher or author.

Personally, I look forward to having my Internet connection's speed, throughput and latency improve as the people who are abusing it through their criminal actions are kicked off.

Those are all going to improve after the infringers are removed from the equation and the networks are once again used for legitimate, legal activity, aren't they?

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky