Jump to content



Photo

Gnome 3.8 to get new folder icons

gnome folder icons

  • Please log in to reply
50 replies to this topic

#16 Haggis

Haggis

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 10
  • Joined: 13-June 07
  • Location: Near Stirling, Scotland
  • OS: Debian 7
  • Phone: Samsung Galaxy S3 LTE (i9305)

Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:25

I did a full icon set previously when i used windows and i quite fancy doing it again

but i would need a complete list of the icons needed

can anyone provide this?


#17 OP f0rk_b0mb

f0rk_b0mb

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 3
  • Joined: 02-June 12
  • Location: 'Murica
  • OS: Windows, Linux, OS X
  • Phone: Motorola Moto G

Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:57

I did a full icon set previously when i used windows and i quite fancy doing it again

but i would need a complete list of the icons needed

can anyone provide this?


Is this what you're looking for? :)

https://live.gnome.o...ials/IconThemes

#18 Geoffrey B.

Geoffrey B.

    LittleNeutrino

  • Tech Issues Solved: 7
  • Joined: 25-July 05
  • Location: Ohio
  • OS: Windows 8.1u1
  • Phone: Nokia Lumia 928 WP8.1

Posted 13 March 2013 - 12:59

this is just my opinion however, i think the new icons are horrible.

#19 Haggis

Haggis

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 10
  • Joined: 13-June 07
  • Location: Near Stirling, Scotland
  • OS: Debian 7
  • Phone: Samsung Galaxy S3 LTE (i9305)

Posted 13 March 2013 - 13:08

Is this what you're looking for? :) https://live.gnome.o...ials/IconThemes


cool i will have a look

#20 .Neo

.Neo

    Generic User

  • Joined: 14-September 05
  • Location: Amsterdam, NL
  • OS: OS X Mavericks
  • Phone: iPhone 5s

Posted 13 March 2013 - 13:30

I think the main problem is the usage of SVG files for icons. While vectors offer great scalability the images tend to be lacking in details giving them that fake computer rendered appearance. If you're purely going for simple symbols like the OS X menu bar / toolbar icons or Windows (Phone) 8 Metro that's not an issue. If you're going for a more realistic look it does become a problem.

I'm guessing it will be next to impossible to fully recreate this as a vector:

Attached Images

  • Example.png


#21 HawkMan

HawkMan

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 4
  • Joined: 31-August 04
  • Location: Norway
  • Phone: Noka Lumia 1020

Posted 13 March 2013 - 13:45

Should be fairly simple actually. It's a perfect vector example


#22 zhangm

zhangm

    Just bitter.

  • Tech Issues Solved: 13
  • Joined: 21-August 02

Posted 13 March 2013 - 13:48

Is there something wrong with the color calibration of my screen, or did they seriously design an icon set based on orange symbols on brown?

#23 +Karl L.

Karl L.

    xorangekiller

  • Tech Issues Solved: 15
  • Joined: 24-January 09
  • Location: Virginia, USA
  • OS: Debian Testing

Posted 13 March 2013 - 14:03

Since Apple rewrote Finder in Cocoa I honestly don't have much of an issue with it and never really understood the perpetual hate some feel towards it. Sometimes it's like Finder suffers from the Internet Explorer Syndrome. Since Mac OS X Panther I always liked its clean appearance, as such I think Gnome's file manager looks pretty nice as well.


I don't have as much of a problem with the look or stability of Finder as I do the functionality, or lack thereof. It is not that Finder is inherently terrible. Like you said, it works well for what it does and hasn't constantly crashed since many releases ago. However, I would stop liking Nautilus too if the developers stripped away too much functionality, as they seem intent to do. Nautilus 3.6 allows me to create multiple tabs, rename files and folders (without viewing their properties), cut, always display the navigation bar (instead of the default breadcrum bar), delete files without sending them to the trash, connect to network shares by typing their address (and often my credentials) into the navigation bar, and elevate privileges before launching an executable. If Finder could do all those things I would consider it as capable as Nautilus, or at least a worthy replacement for my use case.

#24 .Neo

.Neo

    Generic User

  • Joined: 14-September 05
  • Location: Amsterdam, NL
  • OS: OS X Mavericks
  • Phone: iPhone 5s

Posted 13 March 2013 - 14:07

Should be fairly simple actually. It's a perfect vector example

From what I've read a few years ago they do the basic image in vector but much of the details are actually added later on rasterized, meaning it's not a full vector. A lot of icons are made that way.

If Finder could do all those things I would consider it as capable as Nautilus, or at least a worthy replacement for my use case.

I believe the Finder can finally "cut" since OS X Lion. It's called "Move Item Here" instead of cut though and uses cmd + option + V instead of cmd + X. We've always been able to rename files and folders in Finder without bringing up the Info window. Simply click the label or hit Enter. No idea who told you otherwise. Always having to send files to the Trash seems to fit Apple's way of doing things. You should be able to type in the address of network shares through the Go dialogue window, although granted it isn't always visible. It's kinda puzzling why Finder still doesn't have tab support though. I would like that as well without having to resort to third-party hacks I don't trust.

#25 threetonesun

threetonesun

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 26-February 02

Posted 13 March 2013 - 14:11

Wow, I didn't realise how much the Gnome file browser looks like the OS X finder these days, that's not really that good an inspiration to copy from (The Finder is a horrible app)

What's next, are they going to remove the ability to merge folders or "cut" files? because the Finder can't do that either.


IIRC Gnome had the side panel before Finder did, I'm sure some Tuxxer here could prove me wrong though (or right).

#26 .Neo

.Neo

    Generic User

  • Joined: 14-September 05
  • Location: Amsterdam, NL
  • OS: OS X Mavericks
  • Phone: iPhone 5s

Posted 13 March 2013 - 14:38

IIRC Gnome had the side panel before Finder did, I'm sure some Tuxxer here could prove me wrong though (or right).

Nautilus as it shipped with GNOME 2.6 in 2004 doesn't seem to have a sidebar, at least not by default. Apple introduced the Finder sidebar in 2003 as part of Mac OS X 10.3 Panther.

https://help.gnome.o...ease-notes/2.6/

#27 threetonesun

threetonesun

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 26-February 02

Posted 13 March 2013 - 14:45

Nautilus as it shipped with GNOME 2.6 in 2004 doesn't seem to have a sidebar, at least not by default. Apple introduced the Finder sidebar in 2003 as part of Mac OS X 10.3 Panther.

https://help.gnome.o...ease-notes/2.6/


it shows up in some form here in 2.24 (with tab support too), also released in 2003.

Anyway, it never struck me that Gnome was aping OSX, they both just seem like a logical way to make a non-Windows file manager.

#28 .Neo

.Neo

    Generic User

  • Joined: 14-September 05
  • Location: Amsterdam, NL
  • OS: OS X Mavericks
  • Phone: iPhone 5s

Posted 13 March 2013 - 14:57

Having a way to store frequently accessed locations seems logical to begin with and something I would want in any OS. Although with recent GNOME iterations it does become extremely obvious they're going after the Finder's design. :p

Attached Images

  • 5.png


#29 The_Decryptor

The_Decryptor

    STEAL THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

  • Tech Issues Solved: 4
  • Joined: 28-September 02
  • Location: Sol System
  • OS: iSymbian 9.2 SP24.8 Mars Bar

Posted 14 March 2013 - 05:05

I think the main problem is the usage of SVG files for icons. While vectors offer great scalability the images tend to be lacking in details giving them that fake computer rendered appearance. If you're purely going for simple symbols like the OS X menu bar / toolbar icons or Windows (Phone) 8 Metro that's not an issue. If you're going for a more realistic look it does become a problem.

I'm guessing it will be next to impossible to fully recreate this as a vector:


That is mostly vector anyway, the only thing that wouldn't be is the "recylcled paper" texture (And that would be because it's simply easier to handle that as a raster, doing it as a procedural texture is harder to create + more computationally complex)

You don't want icons using SVG filters basically, they're slow and if you end up rasterising icons on the GPU you're doing something wrong.

Edit: Everybody is using vector icons, the difference is that KDE/Gnome support them natively, you don't have to rasterise them first like on OS X or Windows.

#30 .Neo

.Neo

    Generic User

  • Joined: 14-September 05
  • Location: Amsterdam, NL
  • OS: OS X Mavericks
  • Phone: iPhone 5s

Posted 14 March 2013 - 09:51

That is mostly vector anyway, the only thing that wouldn't be is the "recylcled paper" texture (And that would be because it's simply easier to handle that as a raster, doing it as a procedural texture is harder to create + more computationally complex)

Yes, and it were those exact details I was referring to... Without the recycled paper texture you would end up with a highly computer generated appearance like the folders in the original post.

Edit: Everybody is using vector icons, the difference is that KDE/Gnome support them natively, you don't have to rasterise them first like on OS X or Windows.

Like I already said "everybody using vector icons" is correct to a certain degree: With OS X icons the base is done in vector but a lot of details are then later added rasterized, meaning you don't have a fully vectorized icon. On Linux it's pure vector which explains why all icons lack detail.