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Will I regret buying a "K" CPU?

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#16 remixedcat

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 13:34

Would you rather spend the 30 something now and have peace of mind that your CPU won't roast or would you rather pay 200+ later??? I'd take the first option.


#17 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 15:35

Would you rather spend the 30 something now and have peace of mind that your CPU won't roast or would you rather pay 200+ later??? I'd take the first option.

I've never overclocked, and have never once had an issue with a stock CPU cooler. Intel aren't stupid :o

#18 remixedcat

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 15:39

Still, it's always a good idea to have a better than rated cooler. OCing or not.

#19 Crisp

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 15:44

Get the special K

#20 +sanke1

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 15:44

Stick with non-K

I purposefully bought a non-K because then once my setup is complete and stable, I won't get the urge to over clock and make it run hotter or unstable.

Also I figured that over clocking is not going to make difference in majority of games.

If you are into that 3D Mark e-peni* score game, then only buy "K" version.

#21 +LogicalApex

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 15:53

It all depends on your needs as the K and non K chips aren't 100% identical. For instance, K series chips lack VT-d support. If you're planning on using VMs a lot and not planning on overclocking then a K series chip is worse off than a non-K. Basically, it all depends on your needs and what the chip offers. But a K isn't the same as a non-K with the ability to overclock. Intel doesn't like to make anything that easy :p

Would you rather spend the 30 something now and have peace of mind that your CPU won't roast or would you rather pay 200+ later??? I'd take the first option.


Keep in mind that if your CPU roasted due to a failure of the stock fan when properly installed Intel would be obligated to replace it for you as long as you purchased the retail chip. Intel gives all of their retail chips a three year warranty. As a result, I'm sure the stock cooler is more than enough unless you have needs that extend beyond that (overclocking, quieter operation, etc.).

#22 Sentron

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 15:56

I have a K CPU as well, never needed to overclock it.

#23 remixedcat

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 16:14

It all depends on your needs as the K and non K chips aren't 100% identical. For instance, K series chips lack VT-d support. If you're planning on using VMs a lot and not planning on overclocking then a K series chip is worse off than a non-K. Basically, it all depends on your needs and what the chip offers. But a K isn't the same as a non-K with the ability to overclock. Intel doesn't like to make anything that easy :p



Keep in mind that if your CPU roasted due to a failure of the stock fan when properly installed Intel would be obligated to replace it for you as long as you purchased the retail chip. Intel gives all of their retail chips a three year warranty. As a result, I'm sure the stock cooler is more than enough unless you have needs that extend beyond that (overclocking, quieter operation, etc.).


Wouldn't you rather not go through the RMA stuff though? I had to RMA 2 AMD CPUs and it wasn't that fun. I'd rather buy better stuff I wouldn't have to RMA. Not chance anything.

I have a K and I run VMs fine BTW. Using Hyper-v

#24 sagum

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 16:15

I bought a 3570. The 3570K was £5 more, but it's not as simple as that, because to overclock it, I'd have to buy a new (decent) fan, which would probably be £25 or something.

In the end, I decided to save the £30+, and also save the space in my PC case (such fans tend to be large, and my GPU (7870 "Tahiti LE") is already HUGE).

Will I regret this decision? :D


You'll probably end up replacing the stock Intel CPU cooler within the year anyway. You may as well do it now, rather then arsing about replacing it later on.

#25 sagum

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 16:20

Keep in mind that if your CPU roasted due to a failure of the stock fan when properly installed Intel would be obligated to replace it for you as long as you purchased the retail chip. Intel gives all of their retail chips a three year warranty. As a result, I'm sure the stock cooler is more than enough unless you have needs that extend beyond that (overclocking, quieter operation, etc.).


It's next to impossible to burn an Intel CPU if it's voltages are in range. The thermal-mass of the heat sink is enough for it to run without the fan working. However, the CPU's own thermal cut-out, will speed step the CPU down to protect it. You can, although wouldn't recommend it, remove the heat sink and it'll not burn out. I wouldn't hold out much hope of ever using their warranty on a failed stock cooler, they'll be replacing it because the chip itself failed, and of course, Intel will never know if you used a stock cooler or not... unless you tell them :)

#26 +LogicalApex

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 16:25

Wouldn't you rather not go through the RMA stuff though? I had to RMA 2 AMD CPUs and it wasn't that fun. I'd rather buy better stuff I wouldn't have to RMA. Not chance anything.

I have a K and I run VMs fine BTW. Using Hyper-v


Not saying the RMA would be fun, I've never done it with Intel, but that if Intel is warranting the CPU for 3 years then I'm sure their cooler is designed well enough to handle normal load.

Yes, a K series CPU will support virtualization, as all newer Intel chips do, but it won't support all of Intel virtualization features. Notably Intel VT-d; Virtualized Direct-I/O support. Essentially it speeds up I/O access in VMs and reduces load on the CPU by allowing it to not waste clock cycles virtualizing the I/O subsystem. So it results in a faster VM and the ability to run more VMs/more responsive host.

#27 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 16:36

I don't use VMs but I MIGHT one day overclock.

The CPU is already on its way, so I have two choices: Keep it - or send it back, get a refund, and order the K. The second option could take two weeks :/

#28 remixedcat

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 16:38

I still don't get why you are all saying it's a good idea to cheap out like that and have crappy cooling but, whatevs.

Don't come bawwing on here that you fried your CPU....

#29 OP Elliot B.

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 16:39

I still don't get why you are all saying it's a good idea to cheap out like that and have crappy cooling but, whatevs. Don't expect to be bawwing over it later.

It's not "cheaping out" if someone has no plans to overclock. A stock cooler from Intel will be sufficient for almost the while life of the chip.

#30 Draconian Guppy

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 16:42

I've never overclocked, and have never once had an issue with a stock CPU cooler. Intel aren't stupid :o

Still, it's always a good idea to have a better than rated cooler. OCing or not.


Disagree kitteh, stock Ivy bridge coolers are more than enough if you have an adequate airflow in your case.


The reason I would buy a K cpu, is after reading ( an article here on neowin) that they're are cherry picked and inspected individually, if that adds any peace of mind anyway in case of failure after warranty, less chance of RMA, etc.