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#16 mwc

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 21:50

Asus RT-N66U

Has DDWRT.


#17 Mindovermaster

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Posted 23 May 2013 - 21:52

Isn't DDWRT and Tomato interchangeable?

#18 PGHammer

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 02:15

The RT-N66U is an excellent choice. Load it up with Tomato firmware and you've got a rock solid really fast router.


The same can be said about the NETGEAR WNDR3700v4, even with the factory firmware.

I got mine two months back (replaced a WNR3500v1) and it's a dual-band N all-gigabit (LAN and WAN) router that does everything I ask of it - and then some.

It even supports DHCP6-PD in the stock firmware; number of other routers (at any price) that do so - one. (Apple's horrendously pricey AirPort Extreme.) It supports DLNA as well - not exactly commonplace for a $100USD router.

I'm actually thinking of doing gigabit teaming with this router - because both OSes I run on my desktop (Windows 8 and Server 2012) explicitly support it.

Post setup, what I did was turn off the (isolated) guest network, and lock down both low and high bands (WPA2-TKIP+AES), which have complete isolation from each other (different IDs *and* passphrases).

Hack-resistant, bulletproof, and a bargain - and on stock firmware no less. What is wrong with that?

#19 +BudMan

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Posted 27 May 2013 - 12:48

"I'm actually thinking of doing gigabit teaming with this router"

To what? Your internet connection of over 1gbps? Other machines on your network, do the hdd support moving files over the speed of 1gbps? Good gig nics you should see in the 900Mbps plus range, so /8 your looking at over 100MBps in a file transfer - do you disks support more than that for a sustained xfer? Are you moving files between SSD across your network?

In a home or smb setup with only a few users, the need for over 1 gig connections or even a backbone is highly unlikely to be of use. But sure if you want to do it so you can say you did it and brag about your iperf speeds - have fun ;)

"lock down both low and high bands (WPA2-TKIP+AES), which have complete isolation from each other (different IDs *and* passphrases)."

And are they on the same lan segment? if so then I am fairly sure they are connected.. Since you stated you disabled the guest wireless which is normally limited to only internet access. Creating multiple SSID, with different psk does not isolate them. Are you running multiple vlans with acls between them? If not they are on the same network segment I would guess with no isolation other than connecting via a different ssid and psk.

#20 PGHammer

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 20:10

"I'm actually thinking of doing gigabit teaming with this router"

To what? Your internet connection of over 1gbps? Other machines on your network, do the hdd support moving files over the speed of 1gbps? Good gig nics you should see in the 900Mbps plus range, so /8 your looking at over 100MBps in a file transfer - do you disks support more than that for a sustained xfer? Are you moving files between SSD across your network?

In a home or smb setup with only a few users, the need for over 1 gig connections or even a backbone is highly unlikely to be of use. But sure if you want to do it so you can say you did it and brag about your iperf speeds - have fun ;)

"lock down both low and high bands (WPA2-TKIP+AES), which have complete isolation from each other (different IDs *and* passphrases)."

And are they on the same lan segment? if so then I am fairly sure they are connected.. Since you stated you disabled the guest wireless which is normally limited to only internet access. Creating multiple SSID, with different psk does not isolate them. Are you running multiple vlans with acls between them? If not they are on the same network segment I would guess with no isolation other than connecting via a different ssid and psk.


The reason for the teaming is to increase bandwidth/reduce lag *because* I multitask - I'm not one of those that shut down every application while gaming, or do the same while doing background P2P - that should normally not be necessary. The reason for the isolation is so high-band-capable devices don't impact low-band ones, or vice-versa. The 5 GHz N band is much better for video streaming than the 2.4 GHz band - hence the only occupant OF that band is mom's smart TV two floors up. Other than that TV, there is typically only one other wireless connection running at any one time. The teaming is for this specific PC - not the network as a whole, and it will be WIRED, not wireless.



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