Jump to content



Photo

Game publishers need to copy the movie industry


  • Please log in to reply
26 replies to this topic

#1 Zedox

Zedox

    Neowinian

  • 836 posts
  • Joined: 12-August 09

Posted 22 June 2013 - 19:42

TL;DR - Games should be sold digitally first, and then physical copies sold later.

 

We know that the game industry is hurting by used games. I read http://devfodder.blo...-used-game.html in which he named how the movie industry gets most of its money because of the exclusivity of the theaters, and then releasing the physical copy of the movie later on after the sales of the theaters diminish. The people who didn't want to pay to go see the movie but still want a copy (or people who want to watch it again) will buy the retail copy.


What we're moving to...
 

The video game industry is going to move to digital as the majority delivery service. It's only a matter of time. What won't go away anytime soon is the physical copies of games. Just like how vinyls, cds, and blu-rays are still being sold, the same is going to happen to games. Now, having same day digital downloads is a step into making digital a reason for a user to get a digital copy (other than console features). This will handle some of the realities of used games as (for now) digital games can't be traded in. The problem is that it doesn't solve it for majority of first day users. Most users will go and get the physical copy, beat the game, trade it in, and the problem continues.

 

Proposal

 

What I propose is that game publishers will need to copy the movie industry in that they need a "theatre" and that theatre is digital. You make the new release of a game digital only and then over time, you release a physical copy. This guarantees a game publisher that in a certain amount of time, that all the sales of their game are pure profit (just like theaters). Games make most of their profit within the first 2 months of sale. Another thing about the movie industry is that consumers don't know when the physical copy is going to be released. It all depends on when the movie stops doing well in theaters. Publishers can use that information to say after a period of time that the physical copy is being released.

 

Some negatives, some positives...

 

Now I know, as consumers, some will not like that as they like going to the store on release day (or night) to buy their game. This will alienate those users. Yes, that is the major downfall of this proposal. The other is that those users will not know when the physical copy will be released because the digital copy is selling well. The people who want the game (and are able with their online) will download the game.

 

This will ease the people into digital downloads but still have the ability to get a physical copy (after a certain period of time) and still able to trade in games. This will appeal to game publishers because of their new release not being able to be traded and bought used, but still sell to those who want physical and not being a total a-hole about it. It's a trade off. Now Gamestop will still be able to trade and sell used physical copies of games (and bundle them with DLC for more profit) but they will lose out on profit margins (depending on how publishers price the physical copy…) for saying "Hey, this game that just came out, you can buy it used for $5 cheaper).

 

This also helps the industry move towards digital in a way that doesn't necessarily seem horrible to everyone. What do you think? I know I probably forgot to say some things. Sorry for the long read but I wanted to clarify things.




#2 kurupy

kurupy

    Neowinian

  • 199 posts
  • Joined: 06-April 10
  • Location: Liverpool, UK
  • OS: Windows 7
  • Phone: HTC One X (Slimbean 4.3)

Posted 22 June 2013 - 20:16

The system we have now has worked for years, i see no reason to change it to completely digital. OK you could point to the cost of manufacturing the disk/case/booklet etc then the shipping costs etc, etc. but at the end of the day, that £45/$60 game you have just picked up from your local store, is still going to cost that much via PSN/LIVE.

 

I definitely should not have to wait X number of months to buy at retail because its digital exclusive. I buy full priced retail copies of games, i don't trade them in, i keep them gathering dust on my shelf. 

 

The movie industries system is antiquated, that's why the likes of Netflix/HULU/etc are on the rise. I seen Man of Steel here in the UK, cost me £5.60 for the 2D version. how much of that do you think actually goes to the studio? If i could buy the Blu-Ray on day 1 for £20, i would.



#3 thatguyandrew1992

thatguyandrew1992

    Neowinian Senior

  • 2,319 posts
  • Joined: 22-January 09

Posted 22 June 2013 - 20:40

The system we have now has worked for years, i see no reason to change it to completely digital. OK you could point to the cost of manufacturing the disk/case/booklet etc then the shipping costs etc, etc. but at the end of the day, that £45/$60 game you have just picked up from your local store, is still going to cost that much via PSN/LIVE.

 

I definitely should not have to wait X number of months to buy at retail because its digital exclusive. I buy full priced retail copies of games, i don't trade them in, i keep them gathering dust on my shelf. 

 

The movie industries system is antiquated, that's why the likes of Netflix/HULU/etc are on the rise. I seen Man of Steel here in the UK, cost me £5.60 for the 2D version. how much of that do you think actually goes to the studio? If i could buy the Blu-Ray on day 1 for £20, i would.

Most of the money from ticket prices goes to the studio. The theater itself gets a larger portion as time goes on. When a movie first comes out, the theater gets little.



#4 BobSlob

BobSlob

    Neowinian

  • 177 posts
  • Joined: 07-May 07

Posted 22 June 2013 - 20:48

I think a move to 100% digital is fine... but ISPs (at least in North America) are getting more and more restrictive with bandwidth to the point of killing innovation. There's also that "digital distribution is cost savings for the consumer" which... by the prices on Origin/Steam/PSO/Xbox Live is a lie.



#5 n_K

n_K

    Neowinian Senior

  • 5,386 posts
  • Joined: 19-March 06
  • Location: here.
  • OS: FreeDOS
  • Phone: Nokia 3315

Posted 22 June 2013 - 20:51

Erm sorry what, day 1 downloadable only? Why would that make things 'better'? You already have downloadable games with retail too atm, I don't see how stopping retails would improve anything at all.

 

And as for digital only without retail releases and not allowing trading in, if that was to happen I'd prompty stop buying games and go with piracy.



#6 trag3dy

trag3dy

    Neowinian Senior

  • 6,833 posts
  • Joined: 03-March 05
  • Location: USA

Posted 22 June 2013 - 20:56

I suspect the theory is that it would help combat piracy. But if anything digital download only helps with that.



#7 Luc2k

Luc2k

    Neowinian

  • 1,293 posts
  • Joined: 16-May 09

Posted 22 June 2013 - 21:10

So.. how would this benefit the consumer exactly?



#8 Doli

Doli

    Goo ball

  • 7,477 posts
  • Joined: 28-October 04
  • Location: Tower of Goo Memorial Park and Recreation Center

Posted 22 June 2013 - 21:11

If they do that (and i hope they dont) then they better have a preload for the games so its ready on release day. It took me a week just to down load Max Payne 3's 30 GB on steam. I cant leave my computer on downloading all day so I only download overnight. I just finsihed downloading Uncharted 3 on PSN and that was about a week also. Im glad Uncharted 3 was broken up into parts so I didnt have to download the 3D movies because that would have made the game a 40 GB download.



#9 McKay

McKay

    Neowinian Stallion

  • 6,011 posts
  • Joined: 29-August 10
  • Location: 308 Negra Arroyo Lane
  • OS: Windows 8.1
  • Phone: LG G3

Posted 22 June 2013 - 21:22

I would prefer digital and physical to be available at the same time. For consoles I'd also like ALL games to be available for download too. The digital download game selection for 360 was pitiful. Maybe offer it at a cheaper price too since I can't trade digital downloads in etc. 



#10 OP Zedox

Zedox

    Neowinian

  • 836 posts
  • Joined: 12-August 09

Posted 22 June 2013 - 22:48

So.. how would this benefit the consumer exactly?

 

It doesn't. (unless the prices change for the better) I was speaking for publishers.



#11 goatsniffer

goatsniffer

    Supercalifragilisticexpialidosh

  • 1,091 posts
  • Joined: 11-January 04
  • Location: New York, USA

Posted 22 June 2013 - 23:04

I'm no astronaught doctor, but last I lifted up the back of consumerism and checked consumers still drive consumerism, which feeds businesses. If you screw your consumers, especially the diehard ones that wait around on sidewalks to get their 'hands' on their game on launch day, then you screw your business. The same diehard fans that proudly display their physical game collections and buy multiple editions of the same game.

The movie industry is the way it is because it's a monopoly, like music used to be. Once someone found a way to give the music consumer a better way to get their music people stopped listening to radio all day hoping to hear their favorite song once, or going to stores to browse for music.

In line with your proposal, I would like to make a proposal to help the oil industry. Determine the hours surfing the day when the majority of people purchase gas and raise the price during that time.

#12 +Majesticmerc

Majesticmerc

    Resident Idealist

  • 6,170 posts
  • Joined: 24-August 05
  • Location: United Kingdom
  • OS: Arch Linux / Win 7
  • Phone: HTC One X

Posted 22 June 2013 - 23:09

Remind me again why we're taking pity on the publishers? There's no reason that they're somehow entitled to a share of the aftermarket profits. If they lose money on a game because they don't get any money from second hand sales they (a) didn't charge enough money for the original sale and/or (b) it cost too much to publish the game.

 

Piracy, of course, is and for the foreseeable future will continue to be a problem, but when they hit that point where the DRM becomes an obstacle for me, the legitimate buyer, I'm going to go elsewhere. Last time I checked, gaming was still a buyers market.

 

Getting a share of second hand sales is double-dipping (online passes are another matter, since there are costs associated with online play that do warrant further purchase) and they can go suck it if they feel like they're entitled to a second income. Game companies aren't entitled to their existence, so if they're not making enough money, they're not doing it right.



#13 Athernar

Athernar

    ?

  • 3,023 posts
  • Joined: 15-December 04

Posted 22 June 2013 - 23:13

The best solution by far is to just support digital distribution to the best of everyone's ability, consumer, publisher and vendor alike.

 

Some people will prefer to buy discs out of habit, or a desire to sniff fresh game manuals. Others will buy and download digitally the very first second possible. Eventually DD will become dominant and discs will be phased out.

 

Piracy, of course, is and for the foreseeable future will continue to be a problem, but when they hit that point where the DRM becomes an obstacle for me, the legitimate buyer, I'm going to go elsewhere. Last time I checked, gaming was still a buyers market.

 

Piracy isn't a problem, or at the very least it's far less of a problem than used games. Used games are a guaranteed lost sale whereas piracy is not.



#14 trag3dy

trag3dy

    Neowinian Senior

  • 6,833 posts
  • Joined: 03-March 05
  • Location: USA

Posted 23 June 2013 - 01:20

The best solution by far is to just support digital distribution to the best of everyone's ability, consumer, publisher and vendor alike.

 

Some people will prefer to buy discs out of habit, or a desire to sniff fresh game manuals. Others will buy and download digitally the very first second possible. Eventually DD will become dominant and discs will be phased out.

 

 

Piracy isn't a problem, or at the very least it's far less of a problem than used games. Used games are a guaranteed lost sale whereas piracy is not.

 

Maybe game developers should make games that people don't want to get rid of after playing through their 6 hour game with day 1 dlc and pre order bonuses from half a dozen different locations.

 

At the end of the day the "problem" is that 90% of games that come out today are crap. If game devs maybe put a little more effort into making their games people might feel less inclined to sell them to feel like they're actually getting something out of their $60 purchase.



#15 Athernar

Athernar

    ?

  • 3,023 posts
  • Joined: 15-December 04

Posted 23 June 2013 - 01:45

Maybe game developers should make games that people don't want to get rid of after playing through their 6 hour game with day 1 dlc and pre order bonuses from half a dozen different locations.

 

At the end of the day the "problem" is that 90% of games that come out today are crap. If game devs maybe put a little more effort into making their games people might feel less inclined to sell them to feel like they're actually getting something out of their $60 purchase.

 

Sorry, but that's such a cop-out answer. While I am someone that keeps the games I buy, I do also acknowledge that there are people who aren't interested in keeping a game after they've completed it.

 

Your argument is also circular, day 1 DLC and pre-order bonuses exist because of used games in the first place.

 

Let's not pretend the "issues" facing the industry are so simple or one-dimensional, all we can say at this point is that said industry is broken, and it needs fixing.