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Is it easy to install new software on Linux yet?


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#1 moeburn

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:04

I haven't tried Linux since RedHat vSomething.0, but what I do recall was that if it came pre-installed with all the software you needed, it was great.  But if you needed to download a small piece of software, it was a pain.  Suddenly I had to learn what tarballs are and tar.gz and how to compile things in a command line and make binaries and what all of that means... I missed my good old EXE!  

 

So lately I noticed Android was loosely based around Linux, and it has an "APK" package management system - no more compiling for me!  Do any of the linux distro's have a similar system?  Or an automatic way of figuring out what to do with the tar.gz I downloaded when I just want to install a program?




#2 threetonesun

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:09

Linux has had, for the longest time, the easiest software installation system out of all of the major operating systems. In fact OSX and Windows (8, anyway), are just now getting around to similar systems. It just wasn't available on RedHat (or it might have been, depending on when you used Redhat, it was called RPM). Package management, back in the day, anyway, was the domain of Debian-based systems.

 

You're looking for apt-get  (synaptic being the GUI frontend) or a similar package manager. Ubuntu and all of it's derivatives have the Software Center built in.



#3 OP moeburn

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:12

Linux has had, for the longest time, the easiest software installation system out of all of the major operating systems. In fact OSX and Windows (8, anyway), are just now getting around to similar systems. It just wasn't available on RedHat (back in the day, anyway).

 

You're looking for apt-get  (synaptic being the GUI frontend) or a similar package manager. Ubuntu and all of it's derivatives have something similar built in.

 

Are you farking kidding me?!  RedHat was the ONLY one that didn't have it?  I'm talking like 10 years ago, btw.  Damn, and ever since then I've been going around telling everyone how linux is great except for how difficult installing new software is...  

 

TO THE LINUX!!!!



#4 Geoffrey B.

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:13

suppose it depends on which distribution you are using and who you ask. I have never thought installing Software on linux was difficult, its just different than installing on Windows. as threetonesun said apt-get has made our lives much simpler for years now but as far as easy goes. thats up to your level of comfort with the OS.



#5 threetonesun

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:22

Are you farking kidding me?!  RedHat was the ONLY one that didn't have it?  I'm talking like 10 years ago, btw.  Damn, and ever since then I've been going around telling everyone how linux is great except for how difficult installing new software is...  

 

TO THE LINUX!!!!

 

Well, it's stupidly simple on something like Ubuntu or Linux Mint. Certainly compared to the old days. Installing something on Redhat pre-RPM was a PITA, but RPMs (if you could find them), did make the whole process relatively simple. Didn't always work the way you might have expected it to though.

 

Don't feel too bad though, Red hat was by far the easiest distro to install back in the day. Debian, thought it might have had a better package manager, usually came with a million headaches to get through the installation.



#6 ViperAFK

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:23

Its incredibly easy to install software on pretty much any modern distro, and has been for years.... Especially ubuntu and derivatives with its software center and ppa's. Linux has come a long way compared to a decade old version or red hat....



#7 Mindovermaster

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:24

It's gotten even simplier with the software centre. Synaptics, as well. As long as you don't have to compile it, it is easy as pie.



#8 threetonesun

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:28

Also, it's worth mentioning that there's Steam for Linux now, which a) comes as a package for Ubuntu, and b) installs games itself. So yeah, it's been making some pretty impressive strides in the last few years.

 

If you want to see how it works these days, run Linux Mint in a VM. I think you'll be impressed how much it can do, and how fast it will run, even in a VM.



#9 OP moeburn

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:29

Welp, I'm looking for a super-easy-to-use GUI to replace the disaster that is Windows 8, and so far I'm looking at either ubuntu or mint.   I'd be using it for watching movies, browsing internet, some pic/vid editing.  I'd probably leave a dual boot Windows OS for gaming support.  I'm leaning to ubuntu at the moment, as it looks more professional and I'm liking the software store, but any advice would be greatly appreciated!



#10 guitmz

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:33

Elementary OS ;)

 

Or Fedora



#11 threetonesun

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:37

Welp, I'm looking for a super-easy-to-use GUI to replace the disaster that is Windows 8, and so far I'm looking at either ubuntu or mint.   I'd be using it for watching movies, browsing internet, some pic/vid editing.  I'd probably leave a dual boot Windows OS for gaming support.  I'm leaning to ubuntu at the moment, as it looks more professional and I'm liking the software store, but any advice would be greatly appreciated!

 

Mint is based on Ubuntu (or Debian, but most people use the Ubuntu version). It really just comes down to which GUI you prefer, although at the moment I believe Mint is more popular.



#12 Ned

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:37

Go with linux mint.  If your looking to play games on steam, your biggest hurdle will be installing graphics drivers.  I had to install the latest beta drivers to get steam to work properly.



#13 ViperAFK

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:38

Mint is based on Ubuntu (or Debian, but most people use the Ubuntu version). It really just comes down to which GUI you prefer, although at the moment I believe Mint is more popular.

I highly doubt mint has more users than ubuntu. All distrowatch counts is page hits on its own website...

 

Personally I'm not a big fan of mint. IMO its interface is clunky and unpolished. (although it is more customizable than ubuntu's unity).



#14 f0rk_b0mb

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:39

Linux was the first OS with an "App Store" like system. I like Suse because it has a cool "one click install" feature--and it has a great KDE experience. I think suse also has a software center--I think it's called Apper or something like that....



#15 OP moeburn

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Posted 15 July 2013 - 20:39

Mint is based on Ubuntu (or Debian, but most people use the Ubuntu version). It really just comes down to which GUI you prefer, although at the moment I believe Mint is more popular.

 

Well, now I'm leaning more to Mint.  According to this article, which pretty much went through every question I had about the two, Mint is better for the "tech-savvy linux beginner", as it offers more customization and tweaks, which I love :D .  However, apparently people said that once they had learned the interfaces of both, they preferred the Ubuntu interface.  Looking at them, it seems Ubuntu is more MacOS-based, and Mint is more Windows-based.  I think I'd prefer a Windows-based GUI, clunkiness and all. I'll also be installing it on an slow netbook to replace the chugging Windows 7, and apparently Mint handles slow machines better.