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Would using a desktop PC as wifi repeater slow LAN traffic?


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#31 OP moeburn

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 01:44

Also, it could well be that a JACK is not wired correctly. (This is common with wired Ethernet jacks that are installed by those familiar with telco - not LAN - wiring specs.)

 

RJ-11 (telco), unlike RJ-45 LAN, uses dual twisted-pair, not quad twisted-pair.  Where the two crossover is RJ-11/45 xSDN/xDSL - note that both RJ-11 and RJ-45 cabling and plugs can be used for either.  (RJ-11 is, in fact, used for voice-only hardware plugged into xDSL/xSDN, while RJ-45 is used for data equipment, such xDSL/xSDN "modems".)  There is one RJ-45 jack that I strongly suspect of being incorrectly wired - however, I would need to be able to test the questionable jack in isolation, due to its location.

 

Why I suspect the jack:  both ends of the connection otherwise (router and adapter) support gigabit Ethernet; however, the connection itself between them (wired) is only 100 mbps.  The cables themselves (outside of the jack) are gigabit CAT5e, which leaves the jack itself as suspect.

 

If the jack is miswired, I CAN pull the jack and rewire it myself - all I need is time.  (There is enough slack in the run itself that I won't need more cable - I can buy a new jack from RadioShack or MicroCenter.  The jack is NOT integrated into the baseplate.)

 

Unless you are talking about rewiring the PCB traces that lead into an internal NIC card jack/router jack, there are no ethernet jacks in this house.




#32 helpifIcan

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 21:12

helpifIcan, on 25 Aug 2013 - 12:16, said:snapback.png

You said if you had another cable you would wire the laptop too. Why not just buy an inexpensive 4 port switch, connect the incoming cable to it and than a cable to your DT and one to the LT.

 

Easy peasy and full speed.

 

:D

 

I don't have a switch, but I have a very cheap crappy 4 port hub. (I know its a hub, not a switch/router, because it has no gateway, or configuration web page, or anything like that. There are no settings, you just plug stuff in and hope it works.) Is a hub good enough? Or does a switch enable me to use more of the available speed between two computers better?

 

A hub will work fine just a little slower tahan a switch but still faster than WI-FI.  A hub just throws the data at every port a switch sends data to a specific port, since you only have two connections it would be minimal.



#33 +BudMan

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 21:23

"because it has no gateway, or configuration web page, or anything like that."

What?? That does not mean its a hub.. Just means its not a smart switch or manageable switch.

What is the model number on this thing?

#34 HawkMan

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 22:31

[quote name="moeburn" post="595901877" timestamp="1377466148"
 
I don't have a switch, but I have a very cheap crappy 4 port hub.  (I know its a hub, not a switch/router, because it has no gateway, or configuration web page, or anything like that.  There are no settings, you just plug stuff in and hope it works.)  Is a hub good enough?  Or does a switch enable me to use more of the available speed between two computers better?[/quote]

Unless its 10 or so years old. It's probably a switch, it's a long time since they stopped making and selling hubs.

And switches don't have config pages, advanced smart switches do, but then you're talking business networks in general. Or home wiring of network techs who use their home networks for lab.