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Debian static IP in router log

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#1 cork1958

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 14:14

I installed wicd so I could add static IP's to my network configuration on a couple desktops. Yes, I'm totally illiterate with the command line!   :(

 

How come when I check router log under devices (using Tomato firmware) it still shows an IP for Debian AND my static IP address for said computer? 

 

I know this isn't specific to Debian as every Linux distro I've used does this.

 

I have 7 other computers here that are all Windows 7 that don't do anything like that and Windows never has!

 

What I'm asking is how come there's always that "extra" IP address in there for a Linux distro and is it possible to get rid of it? Does that originate from the headers in the host file, or some place else, as I know you have to leave that part in the host file, when editing it?

 

Thank you

 

Edit:

When running the check my dns test from here, https://www.dns-oarc...ices/dnsentropy I get nothing but Google dns servers showing up! I have NOTHING Google related under any part of my network config!

 

When running the spoofabilty test here, https://www.grc.com/dns/dns.htm at least 2 out of 3 dns servers I have implemented show up, then there's a bunch of Google one's also.

 

Hmm? Just noticed the results are different between Opera and Iceweasel on my 2 primary dns servers on Gibsons site!



Best Answer cork1958 , 28 October 2013 - 14:33

"disconnecting network using wicd, then connecting back up in wicd, and then rebooting router."

 

So why would you reboot the router?  And why are you disconnecting and reconnecting?

 

You mentioned "I installed wicd so I could add static IP's to my network configuration on a couple desktops"

 

So when your box boot it grabs a dhcp address I hae to assume - then you use some gui to setup a static on the box.

 

Why don't you just edit your /etc/network/interfaces file?

 

Let us see that file

 

example - here is mine

 

budman@ubuntu:~$ cat /etc/network/interfaces
# This file describes the network interfaces available on your system
# and how to activate them. For more information, see interfaces(5).

# The loopback network interface
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

# The primary network interface
auto eth0
iface eth0 inet static
address 192.168.1.7
netmask 255.255.255.0
gateway 192.168.1.253
 

 

You notice mine is static..  And where exactly is that on your router - dhcp leases?  Arp Table?  Connected devices?  Where?

 

Hey!

 

There is my problem! I didn't know how to edit the interfaces using command line, and in fact didn't think it would/should be necessary, after entering stuff in the default network connections under Applications/Settings/Network Connections and then in wicd also, whether as the only setting or combined with other setting. If that makes any sense!!

 

What's the sense of even having those 2 tools, if they basically do nothing?

 

Definitely all fixed now!! :)

Learn something new everyday, which is ALWAYS cool.

 

Thanks Budman and others!!

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#2 remixedcat

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 15:21

Got any hypervisors installed? (vmware,vbox,etc)

 

These will create a virtual network adapter, hence the extra.



#3 OP cork1958

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 10:53

No,

I do not.

 

As I said,

I know this isn't specific to Debian as every Linux distro I've used does this.



#4 OP cork1958

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 14:08

I think I figured it out.

 

Don't know what the sense of entering any configuration under network connections is when that doesn't do a darn thing for setting a static IP, but since I entered the exact same info there as I have in wicd, and then rebooted router, I no longer am seeing the static IP labeled Debian with that extra IP address! :)

 

Still get nothing but Google IP addresses showing up when testing at that first link I posted above though. Why is that?

 

Gibsons spoofability test shows a couple Google IP's, is all. Still, another why?

 

Sheesh!

This networking stuff is weird in Linux compared to Windows. Used to think I was pretty good at networking crap! :(



#5 +BudMan

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 15:09

"This networking stuff is weird in Linux compared to Windows."

 

What??  Sorry but tcp/ip is tcp/ip be it on windows, linux, bsd, os x, etc.

 

How you configure it might be in different locations, or the syntax of the configuration file might be slightly different - but in the big picture there is nothing different between them when it comes to actually networking.  They have an IP or multiple, be it ipv4 or ipv6.  They have a mask that puts that IP on a network..  And then they have a gateway or an IP they are suppose to send traffic to when they want to go to an IP that is on a different network which they can tell via their mask.

 

This is exactly the same no matter what OS your using.

 

As to you thinking you were good at networking??  Yeah lots of users that click a button or run some wizard in one OS like to think wow this stuff is so easy - I could work in IT ;)  This is akin to thinking because they noticed the button that turns on the light in the frig that was crusted over and cleaned it and now the light works again that they can design freezers and understand the theory of heat engines.

 

heatengine.jpg

 

As to your dns issues - are you pointing to your router for dns?  Where does it point - most likely it got dns from its isp.  As to your networking questions - if you actually ask one, be more than happy to help you answer it.. But I could not actually ascertain a question in you post.

 

If you give us some actual info on how your configured, or think your configured and we an work out why your seeing googledns - other than the obvious for sure answer that if your seeing google in that first link is your client is somewhere in its path asking googledns.



#6 OP cork1958

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 02:10

Hey Budman,

I know you're one of the best around here for network issues and I know the way I was wording that sounded ridiculous, but couldn't think of a more intelligent way to word it!!

 

Originally, I had set up network configuration just under settings/network connections on my Debian 7 network card. I knew that wasn't really setting a static ip per se according to those test sites I posted.

 

After installing wicd, a wired/wireless network manager, I was truly able to set it to a static ip that showed up accordingly according to those sites.

 

 

It wasn't until I matched the settings under both places and my router, that I was able to get BOTH of those sites to show up the DNS servers I was using.

 

The only real question I was asking was why does an IP address show up in my router named Debian along with my static ip address of that particular computer? Did make it look like I had some hypervisor installed as remixedcat mentioned.

 

I never implied I was some network guru either but usually have no problems setting up anything, in Windows that is, and definitely not a Linux guru, for sure! I hope I've made myself at least a little clearer after this whole reply of mumbo jumbo now?! :)



#7 remixedcat

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:25

Please tell us the first six of the Mac address and if it matches actual hardware. You can tell the mfr of the interface by looking up the first six of the Mac address.

http://aruljohn.com/mac.pl

#8 The_Decryptor

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:47

Are you still running a DHCP client on the system? Having 2 apps trying to set 2 config on the same interface isn't going to end well.

As for the DNS issue, what IP are you actually setting in the static config and what IP are you setting via DHCP? If your router has a DNS caching server on it when the static and dynamic info should point at that server, or at least agree on what server to use.

Edit: Depending on how it's configured you could have 2 different (virtual) interfaces on the same network, one with the static config and one with DHCP settings, it'd work ok, but data would switch randomly over the interfaces, which could explain why one test shows different DNS info to another.

#9 remixedcat

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 09:58

Virtual interfaces also could be there as a result of any connection sharing or remote access software. Please, also check for those in addition to doing the MAC address lookup above.



#10 OP cork1958

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 11:19

@the_decryptor:

No, not running a DHCP server or DHCP anything on the system.

 

@remixedcat:

No virtual anything.

 

The first 6 of mac address are 001A4B and it matches the hardware.

 

As I said though. From the messing around I've done, that second IP marked Debian is gone, so that non issue isn't there anymore!

 

I am marking this topic as solved before I screw my head anymore!! Nothing was wrong with anything really as far as my connection, it was just that oddball Debian IP address in router, which I've noticed a second IP no matter what Linux distro I've used before.

 

Thanks folks :)



#11 +BudMan

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 13:33

"which I've noticed a second IP no matter what Linux distro I've used before."

 

You mean like 127.0.0.1 ;)

 

Or was it the ipv6 local link - like fe80::20c:29ff:fedd:2ba

 

Sorry but I play with a lot of linux distros, I play with a lot of OSes period -- and have never seen a second IP, and yet again nothing to work with in your statements.

 

How about you post up your ifconfig and point out what IP addresses your talking about.

 

if you do a dig or nslookup on your linux box - what does it say it used for dns?

 

;; Query time: 22 msec
;; SERVER: 192.168.1.253#53(192.168.1.253)
;; WHEN: Mon Oct  7 08:35:05 2013
;; MSG SIZE  rcvd: 699
 

 

budman@ubuntu:~$ nslookup
>
> www.google.com
Server:         192.168.1.253
Address:        192.168.1.253#53

 

How about what is in your resolv.conf?

 

budman@ubuntu:~$ cat /etc/resolv.conf
# Dynamic resolv.conf(5) file for glibc resolver(3) generated by resolvconf(8)
#     DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE BY HAND -- YOUR CHANGES WILL BE OVERWRITTEN
domain local.lan
search local.lan
nameserver 192.168.1.253


 



#12 OP cork1958

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 14:09

No,

The second ip was 192.168.1.120 and named Debian. This computer in question has a static ip of 192.168.1.109 and no name.

 

As I said, that second ip is gone now, in router.

 

Playing around some more with the settings under applications/settings/network connections, I have found I don't even need those and stuff is running as good as ever and even get the expected results from those 2 sites I posted above.

 

Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 00:1a:4d:1c:a0:f0
inet addr:192.168.1.109 Bcast:192.168.1.255 Mask:255.255.255.0
inet6 addr: fe80::21a:4dff:fe1c:a0f0/64 Scope:Link
UP BROADCAST RUNNING MULTICAST MTU:1500 Metric:1
RX packets:465381 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 frame:0
TX packets:201069 errors:0 dropped:0 overruns:0 carrier:0
collisions:0 txqueuelen:1000
RX bytes:669061413 (638.0 MiB) TX bytes:42945569 (40.9 MiB)
Interrupt:18 Base address:0x9c00

 

 

 

cork@debian:~$ cat /etc/resolv.conf
nameserver 64.81.159.2
nameserver 69.54.70.15
nameserver 4.2.2.2

 

 

 

www.google.com
Server: 64.81.159.2
Address: 64.81.159.2#53
Server: 64.81.159.2
Address: 64.81.159.2#53
 



#13 +BudMan

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 18:44

So you sure this "The second ip was 192.168.1.120 and named Debian." Wasn't just a old lease? That lease would still be in your dhcp server even if you changed your box to static.

So if your box was dhcp before - where did point to for dns? Your router?

#14 OP cork1958

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 10:35

Positive it wasn't just an old lease as I have always had static IP's on my Windows machines and the highest one is 192.168.1.112. Being as they are static, as soon as I shut the machine off, that IP disappears from router.

 

Even if it was an old lease from my slightly newer Debian installs, I was rebooting the router inbetween doing anything, so it would've disappeared then also.

 

Yes,

Pointed to router.

 

As marked, this topic is now officially closed, IMO, and this is my last reply.

 

Thanks



#15 +BudMan

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 13:11

How is it closed when you have stated

 

"I know this isn't specific to Debian as every Linux distro I've used does this."

 

And then give some gibberish that your second IP went away -- thought you said every linux distro does this??  And sorry but yes setting up the IP and the mask and the gateway using a network manager is setting a static, etc..

 

I think your just completely clueless what your even talking about and don't want to admit it.