Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Manage future SSD (C:) Partition

6 posts in this topic

Posted

Hy. I plan to get a new SSD (120GB) but I'm a bit worried about C partition that will be created on it and will get in conflict with actual one named C on HDD. Which is the best way to manage such situation?

1. Install O.S in SSD which will create one single partition (NTFS).

2. Attach HDD with it's own O.S and C partiton..

3. Both C partitions will react wierd or..? I'll edit later C from HDD but..

 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Windows will only assign the "C" to the drive its running from, so you don't have to worry about conflicts, as Windows will not assign the letter "C" to two drives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Although the letters Windows assigns to your disks are somewhat arbitrary, the operating system will make sure they never conflict. However, while I haven't dual-booted two versions of Windows since mid last decade, I distinctly remember Windows XP assigning the boot partition the letter "D" on one installation (dual-booting Windows XP SP1 with the pre-existing Windows 98 SE installation). Up until that point I thought that Windows always automatically assigned "C" to the boot disk regardless. Since I haven't tested this in a very long time, SharpGreen might be correct that modern versions of Windows will always assign the partition they are running from the letter "C".

 

If you want to assign a different letter to any of your partitions, it is fairly easy to do using the Windows Disk Management utility. Just right-click on the partition you wish to reassign, click "Change drive letter and paths...", and use the resulting dialog to "Add...", "Change...", or "Remove" drive letters from the selected partition. Since drive letters cannot conflict, you will need to remove a drive letter that is in use before assigning it to another partition. Older versions of Windows did not allow you to reassign "C", although all other partitions could be reassigned. It looks like that might have changed sometime between Windows 2000 and Windows 8.1 based on the "Change Drive Letters and Paths" dialog I based this reply on, but I have no intention of potentially screwing up my only Windows VM to find out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

So..it will automatically change C:/ from HDD if I select SSD as first boot device and install O.S. on it. Further..I'll be able to format C:/ from HDD and merge it to D:/ from Windows Disk Management.

Any tips & tricks for fist SSD install on my current system? I've never interact with SSD's until now & I want to know the main rules..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

So..it will automatically change C:/ from HDD if I select SSD as first boot device and install O.S. on it. Further..I'll be able to format C:/ from HDD and merge it to D:/ from Windows Disk Management.

Any tips & tricks for fist SSD install on my current system? I've never interact with SSD's until now & I want to know the main rules..

Yea if you install windows to your SSD, then your SSD becomes the "C" drive and your old windows partition/drive will become whatever the next free letter is, either "D" or "E"

 

As far as tips: a) Don't EVER defrag it, b) make sure your SATA ports are set to AHCI mode in your BIOS/UEFI setup BEFORE you install Windows again, as this allows some nifty features like TRIM that aim to improve performance. c) ???, d) Profit

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

whatever the next free letter is, either "D" or "E"

 

Probably F cause D & E are already set on actual HDD as you can see..thanks anyway!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.