Jump to content



Photo

my first ssd, OMG, it cost me to much pain!


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#16 Nick H.

Nick H.

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 14
  • Joined: 28-June 04
  • Location: Switzerland

Posted 03 November 2013 - 12:14

I removed a couple of comments in the replies. There's no need to attack one another.


#17 Radium

Radium

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 08-April 04

Posted 03 November 2013 - 17:00

I don't think you need AHCI enabled, but I do think it notably improves performance. I don't know why you used 3rd party software to partition it instead of just using what is built into Windows, especially if you are going to install/have installed Windows on it since the installer will automatically partition it. Your speeds look "ok," but around half of what the specs indicate on Newegg. I have an 830 model, but I am not home so can't bench and see how my specs compare to yours. Hypothetically your speeds should be faster than mine. Does your motherboard have SATA II or SATA III?

AHCI is vital! The alternative to AHCI is IDE which emulates parallel ATA which is inferior to AHCI.
AHCI is required for TRIM (mandatory for SSD) and NCQ (ideal for drives that support NCQ, great for slow HDD).
Running an SSD without AHCI (in return, TRIM) will make the drive age much faster.
Modern RAID controllers actually run AHCI under the hood.
AHCI is vital, I'm stunned by how many still walk around and say that it's not required.
Of course, the drives are backwards compatible but ignoring AHCI will cause problems. It isn't required to get the drive up and running but AHCI is vital, especially for SSDs!
Sure, SSDs and controllers have improved but native AHCI support is vital to make the SSD last as long as possible and have persistent performance.

#18 Darrian

Darrian

    The Apathetic

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 22-October 01

Posted 04 November 2013 - 00:23

Blah blah blah blah. I never said don't use it, nor did I say that I didn't use it myself.  And he already said that he had it enabled.  However, obviously the drive is still going to function if it's turned off.  I've never heard any such thing about AHCI being necessary for trim, so I did some checking around and found that trim is not dependent on AHCI.  I was able to find many places that stated that but the entry regarding Windows from this page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRIM) sums it up pretty well:

 

"Windows 7 only supports trim for ordinary (SATA) drives and does not support this command for PCI-Express SSDs that are different type of device, even if the device itself would accept the command.[35] It is confirmed that with native Microsoft drivers the Trim command works in AHCI and legacy IDE / ATA Mode.[36]"

 

Don't misunderstand, obviously AHCI is a better option if your controller supports it, but it's probably not going to kill his drive if it's not on.  Also, I seem to recall that my first SSD was required to be in legacy IDE mode in order to flash firmware updates.



#19 Javik

Javik

    Beware the tyrrany of those that wield power

  • Tech Issues Solved: 2
  • Joined: 21-May 12

Posted 04 November 2013 - 00:43

I have an OCZ Agility 3 in an old Dell Optiplex 745 and SATA 2 doesn't have as noticeable an impact on the performance of an SSD as you might imagine if you are using it as a boot / OS drive, the main advantage of the SSD is it's far superior small random IO performance, and as there aren't any SSD's that can bottleneck a SATA2 port in random IO yet, you still essentially get the full benefit of using one as an OS drive, it's only if you use them for gaming, and video / photoshop manipulation that you'd be held back by the interface.

 

Still, I would recommend a board upgrade, no geek likes to leave performance on the table :p



#20 Torolol

Torolol

  • Joined: 24-November 12

Posted 04 November 2013 - 01:05

I usually use the SSD to stores cd/dvd/blu-ray images, as those files are less likely modified, and will need to be reads repeatedly when i mount 'em on virtual drive.

The optimal scenario for SSD usages, which is: write once - read often.

 

And of course I set the OS to NOT write the last access time on that SSD volumes.



#21 +goretsky

goretsky

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 3
  • Joined: 12-March 04
  • Location: Southern California

Posted 04 November 2013 - 04:48

Hello,

I have always found it best to do a clean install when working with SSDs. Microsoft Windows 7's installer (and later OS versions) do a very good job of configuring the operating system to run from a SSD. Utilities like those provided by Intel and Samsung can help reconfigure an operating system migrated from a hard disk drive, but I always look at a hardware upgrade like this as an opportunity to get a fresh start on the installation.

Regards,

Aryeh Goretsky

#22 MillionVoltss

MillionVoltss

    Neowinian Senior

  • Tech Issues Solved: 1
  • Joined: 21-May 04

Posted 04 November 2013 - 14:45

Install Samsung Magician, then optimize and see if you get better results. As said above, you should consider a reinstall.

#23 Radium

Radium

    Neowinian

  • Joined: 08-April 04

Posted 04 November 2013 - 19:05

Blah blah blah blah. I never said don't use it, nor did I say that I didn't use it myself.  And he already said that he had it enabled.  However, obviously the drive is still going to function if it's turned off.  I've never heard any such thing about AHCI being necessary for trim, so I did some checking around and found that trim is not dependent on AHCI.  I was able to find many places that stated that but the entry regarding Windows from this page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TRIM) sums it up pretty well:

 

"Windows 7 only supports trim for ordinary (SATA) drives and does not support this command for PCI-Express SSDs that are different type of device, even if the device itself would accept the command.[35] It is confirmed that with native Microsoft drivers the Trim command works in AHCI and legacy IDE / ATA Mode.[36]"

 

Don't misunderstand, obviously AHCI is a better option if your controller supports it, but it's probably not going to kill his drive if it's not on.  Also, I seem to recall that my first SSD was required to be in legacy IDE mode in order to flash firmware updates.

My mistake!

 

TRIM is an ATA command but AHCI is still vital in my opinion. Buying an SSD and not use AHCI is like buying a Ferrari och only use the first two gears.



#24 ShadowMajestic

ShadowMajestic

    Neowinian Senior

  • Joined: 16-April 10
  • Location: Netherlands
  • OS: Windows 8 Pro 64bit
  • Phone: Nokia Lumia 920

Posted 04 November 2013 - 19:21

My mistake!

 

TRIM is an ATA command but AHCI is still vital in my opinion. Buying an SSD and not use AHCI is like buying a Ferrari och only use the first two gears.

you can't use the other ones within a city though.



#25 Torolol

Torolol

  • Joined: 24-November 12

Posted 04 November 2013 - 19:25

just in case, for whomever using win 8.x with SSD: http://social.techne...m=W8ITProPreRel
 
 

Thanks to this post I decided to re-enable the defrag tool, however because of your answer it made it seem like the tool will automatically recognize SSD's and only send the TRIM hint instead of an actual traditional defrag. This is NOT true until you at least do one initial WEI run. I just ran the defrag tool in my eval of Windows 8 and it took over 5 minutes with 9 or 10 optimization/consolidation passes. I then realized that Windows was treating my Vertex 2 SSD just like a spinning hard drive. Not very happy about that...

To EVERYONE who finds this thread, please if you just installed Windows 8 fresh, make sure your system has run at least one WEI assessment as soon as you can, otherwise the default defrag setting is to optimize/defrag your SSD just like it does to a spinning drive.


overdosage (because of faulty task scheduler + defrag) of this might be dangerous for your SSD health:2je2xig.jpg