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AMD FX-9590

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#1 alwaysonacoffebreak

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 13:17

So I have a question about the 9590. I've been away from the desktop for a while now and have forgot some things. Now that the 9590 has come down to a reasonable price (€280) I have some questions.

 

To put aside the TDP and electric bills

 

Does the 9590 fit for day to day desktop with a decent cooler (water probably)? Gaming, some soft workloads etc. What I mean is that does the motherboard handle the TDP of the CPU when it will get stressed under gaming loads etc. (I think UD7 and Saber support the CPU)

 

I am not asking for suggestions for other CPU's be it AMD or Intel, I am asking about this specific CPU so please don't start a flamewar.



Best Answer +snaphat (Myles Landwehr) , 14 December 2013 - 19:33

Features like? I actually don't have the feature list infront of me right now.

 

Oh it was just the thermal radar control for the fans and ceramics. Regardless if those are gimmicks or not, I don't think that should negatively reflect upon the board itself as a choice.

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#2 HoochieMamma

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 13:20

Of course it would, why would you think otherwise?



#3 OP alwaysonacoffebreak

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 13:24

Been reading (unfortunately most of the info comes from TMH) and some say it can actually melt the socket on the motherboard while stressing the CPU. Sure, I won't be constantly stressing it and all but just to be safe I thought I'll ask around.



#4 +PeterUK

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 14:27

Been reading (unfortunately most of the info comes from TMH) and some say it can actually melt the socket on the motherboard while stressing the CPU. Sure, I won't be constantly stressing it and all but just to be safe I thought I'll ask around.

 

Their is a CPU Thermal Monitor setting that protects the CPU from overheating by reducing the frequency of the CPU.



#5 Arceles

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 14:46

You need a really good motherboard for that processor, at least the Crosshair Z or the Saber tooth, then after that a good cooler, and msot of the people likes to have a fan blowing the vrms. After that I haven't heard any reports of melting components, you are the first one that I heard that says that :p



#6 OP alwaysonacoffebreak

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 16:42

You need a really good motherboard for that processor, at least the Crosshair Z or the Saber tooth, then after that a good cooler, and msot of the people likes to have a fan blowing the vrms. After that I haven't heard any reports of melting components, you are the first one that I heard that says that :p

 

Thankfully I already have an Saber R2 standing without use at the moment. I guess it can manage without the fan for the vrms tho?



#7 Javik

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 16:46

As long as you have a PSU that can handle the power draw and a decent cooler you should have no problems. I agree with the other posters however, you will want a decent motherboard, any motherboard designed for overclocking should handle the load pretty comfortably.



#8 OP alwaysonacoffebreak

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 16:49

Well since I'm thinking of CF'ing two 290's with the 9590 I think a 1000-1200W PSU should do? Also the Saber R2 should be enough, atleast that's what the ASUS page says.

 

I think I should connect myself directly to the power plant already  :laugh:



#9 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 18:42

I don't understanding this 'get a motherboard designed for overclocking to handle the load/heat' talk.

 

A few things:

  • A motherboard doesn't change the heat generation (W) or dissipation characteristics of the processor. This issue isn't overheating with the motherboards, the issue is whether it was engineered to provide the power that a processor would need to operate.
  • One just needs to check the compatibility lists for a motherboard to see if it supports the particular processor. If it does, you are fine, you don't need to specifically find an OCing motherboard to handle the power draw.


#10 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 18:49

Well since I'm thinking of CF'ing two 290's with the 9590 I think a 1000-1200W PSU should do? Also the Saber R2 should be enough, atleast that's what the ASUS page says.

 

I think I should connect myself directly to the power plant already  :laugh:

 

The thermal radar on that mobo is pretty much a gimmick since your heat generation is only going to really be on your CPU and your GPUs (oops forgot memory -- there also). And that's where you need to dissipate directly to keep temperatures low. I suppose the ceramic coating could provide better heat conduction to the heat sink but I'd need to see real results to believe that it is anything more than a gimmick. That being said, if that motherboard supports your processor it is a good fit for it.

 

EDIT: Also, if I am reading this correctly, the ceramic coating thing is on heat sink that is located elsewhere on the board and not on near the processor. So, I'm a bit more skeptical of it now.



#11 OP alwaysonacoffebreak

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 19:07

The ceramic on the saber is pretty much near the CPU socket. But like I said, I'm pretty much between Saber and UD7 right now, they both say they support the CPU but I trust ASUS more than Gigabyte.

 

There were some benchmarks around the net that on full load the 9590 draws around 280w so indeed a pretty high end cooler is needed.



#12 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 19:12

The ceramic on the saber is pretty much near the CPU socket. But like I said, I'm pretty much between Saber and UD7 right now, they both say they support the CPU but I trust ASUS more than Gigabyte.

 

There were some benchmarks around the net that on full load the 9590 draws around 280w so indeed a pretty high end cooler is needed.

 

Isn't it on the heatsink on the bottom right of the board near the PCI sockets (CPU socket is in the top middle)? IMO, both boards are fine. As for which is more reliable, I'd say he ASUS based off of the military grade caps and things.



#13 OP alwaysonacoffebreak

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 19:19

The CPU socket is pretty much surrounded with ceramics so that shouldn't be a problem. Also yea. ASUS has more reliable caps.



#14 +snaphat (Myles Landwehr)

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 19:21

The CPU socket is pretty much surrounded with ceramics so that shouldn't be a problem. Also yea. ASUS has more reliable caps.

 

Oh I see, I actually followed the line in the picture pinpointing the ceramics to the wrong spot  :whistle:. Those green lines match in pretty well with the board color. I'd personally go for the Saber despite that I feel some of the features are gimmicks.



#15 OP alwaysonacoffebreak

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 19:25

Features like? I actually don't have the feature list infront of me right now.





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